ADVERTISEMENT

Knowledge Shelf

Keys for Agile Co-Evolution of the WBS and Schedule Network: The "Schedule Network 100 Percent" Rule and the "Add and Prune Dependencies" Algorithm

by David Pratten, PMP

The pressure for greater agility in project management approaches increases the challenge of achieving coherence between the WBS and the schedule network. This article elaborates on best practices where the goal of full coherence between the WBS and schedule network can be taken for granted and maintained without effort by the project planner.

What the Stakeholders Really Need

by Pedro Giovani Zanetti, PMP

Active and honest communication targeted to relevant stakeholders will foster alignment and help meet expectations to achieve project objectives. This article outlines key steps for strengthening the relationship between the project manager and the project participants.

recent blog postings


recent questions

featured webinar

Strategic & Agile Portfolio Management

PREMIUM on-demand webinar
by Sara Nunez, Ali Forouzesh

This webinar will provide a roadmap to show you how to transform the portfolio management discipline in your PMO function to rapidly react to changes in the marketplace.

Voices on Project Management

The Critical Path

Spotlight On: Sustainability

12 Tips for Making Your Project Environmentally Friendly

by Anna Keavney

Global powers, government and business alike are taking climate change seriously like never before. What can we do as project managers to help the environment? Here are 12 practical ways that we can embed green practices into projects.

Spotlight On: Career Development

From Trust to Delegation

by Stacy King

All project managers have physical, mental and emotional limitations. Yet not everyone recognizes that. The net effect is a collective belief system that project managers have no known physical, mental or emotional limitations. This belief can, when not corrected, lead to the self-fulfilling prophecy called burnout. How can we combat this?

Topic Teasers

Topic Teasers Vol. 71: Better Estimates

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP

Question: I have a person on my team who is constantly late with his activities. We’ve spoken, with me using my best managerial techniques, to try to help him understand the impact to the project when he does not finish work as planned. Where do I go from here?
A. When a person consistently does not finish as planned, there is a problem with team estimates. Hold a full team meeting to see what can be done to create more realistic estimates in the future by all team members.
B. You have an employee who obviously has no regard for the other members of the team. Put him on report, and if he misses even one additional deadline, either fire him or ask to have him removed from your team, depending on your power.
C. This person must be doing an acceptable job when he finishes; the issue is just with his estimating skills. Track his work and find a multiplying factor to use when adding his activities to the Work Breakdown Structure.
D. This employee seems to have a communication issue. He cannot clearly state how long it will take him to finish an activity he estimated himself, and he is not communicating to you when he will be late. See if Human Resources has a training class to help him become more articulate.
Pick your answer then Test Your Knowledge!


Badge of the Week
Rocket Surgeon
You can earn this badge when you answer 250 PMchallenge questions correctly.
ADVERTISEMENTS

"I only hope that we never lose sight of one thing - that it was all started by a mouse."

- Walt Disney

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsors