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Agile Portfolios: A 3-D Approach

by Lourdes Medina, PMP, PfMP, ITIL, CSM

Portfolio management is responsible for translating strategy, changes, innovation and dynamism into value for an organization. To achieve portfolio agility requires synergy in all aspects of the enterprise: in the strategic environment, in the portfolio tactical environment and in that of the projects.

Project Failure as a Scapegoat for Organizational Failure (Part 2)

by Majeed Hosseiney

Organizations often talk of project management failure and put us in a vicious cycle of cause/effect analysis loops. The problem is that we look for the cause of project management failure where the light is--and not in the dark spot where the true issue is. This three-part series helps to uncover some key underlying and recurring sources of confusion within organizations. Part 1 looked at decision-making dilution; we now turn our attention to methodological and structural confusion.

The 8 Change Mindsets

by Braden Kelley

There are many different reasons why people will do the right thing to help you build and maintain the momentum for your change initiative and to help you achieve sustained, collective momentum. The key to building and maintaining momentum is to understand and harness the different mindsets that cause people to choose change.

What It Takes to Manage Hybrid Projects

by John Reiling

These days, it takes more than project management skills to succeed. It takes a person with agility—flexibility in understanding and applying the ins and outs of any method. Let’s investigate what "hybrid PM" is all about!

The Hybrid PM: Time to Learn a New Language

by Andy Jordan

As more and more projects blend waterfall and agile elements, the role of the project manager—and to some degree the ScrumMaster—changes, but in what ways?

The Morphing Project Manager

by Laura Burford

Hybrid project manager roles might be the way of the future. Do you need to revisit your skills? This article provides guidelines to assist you with becoming a hybrid PM, and starts by defining their characteristics.

Case Study: Project Agility in a Strict Waterfall Organization

by Eric Frisvold, PMP

When a project requires an agile delivery model but the organization is tied to strict waterfall methodology, the team needs to be creative in order to meet its goals using all of the tools in the project management tool bag. Read the story of a team that learned that agile and waterfall can (and, indeed, should) co-exist to provide outstanding results.

What the Heck is Hybrid, Anyway?

by Andy Jordan

Hybrid project management is getting a lot of press recently, but what does that mean? And is it really what we should be striving for?

Hybrid Methods for High-Tech Spaces

by Carleton Chinner

New technology projects carry a high degree of uncertainty. Agile promises to manage uncertainty. Does this make for a natural match? Or are there more factors that influence the project manager’s chosen approach to a new project?

Planning and Managing Development Projects: The Hybrid Way

by Michael Wood

The risk we take in swearing allegiance to a specific approach is that following the approach often becomes more important than achieving the goal of the project. Let’s explore the merits of using the best of different approaches—and how marrying them into a hybrid model impacts the way projects are planned and managed.

The Best of Both Worlds

by Kevin Coleman

If you have not run a hybrid project leveraging agile and waterfall methodologies, you are in for a great learning experience. Let’s put the two distinctively different approaches into a broad and high-level context…

Does Hybrid Project Management Mean a Hybrid Team?

by Andy Jordan

As hybrid projects become more common, what has to change among team members, and how do we manage that change? Do we have to minimize these disruption scenarios, or can we create an environment where teams are more comfortable with the shifts?

How to Demonstrate Trustworthiness: A Key Success Factor for Distributed Agile Teams

by Mark Kilby

The best agile software teams communicate well, push hard to meet deadlines, support each other when struggling with issues, and go above and beyond to maintain quality. The key element is trustworthiness. In this article, the writer provides a self-assessment tool that will allow you and your team members to assess and demonstrate trustworthiness over time.

Topic Teasers Vol. 77: Agile Non-Functional Requirements

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP

Question: We have switched to agile practices and, if I do say so myself, I think we are doing an awesome job. However, even though we are carefully creating backlog lists and writing user stories, more often than not our end product or service still does not meet the expectations of our internal and external customers. Has something been left out of what we were taught?
A. Agile does provide a way to use non-functional requirements in its methodology, but often it is overlooked or not stressed when new teams are preparing their first few projects. Make a point to add them into your new process.
B. The reason agile projects are completed so much faster and provide so much more value is that with the Scrum practice methodology, it is no longer necessary to consider vague things like non-functional requirements. If they aren’t going to function anyway, why bother with them.
C. User stories are only written if there is a need for outside personas to be created to represent users. Non-functional requirements are the ones assigned to those personas who would not be interested in your product or service, and therefore can be excluded from consideration.
D. Many projects have both functional and non-functional requirements that impact the outcome of the project. That is why only traditional processes should be used. Agile processes work only on software projects, and then only when there is an absence of non-functional requirements to be considered.
Pick your answer then Test Your Knowledge!

Moving from Traditional to Agile DevOps

by Kevin Aguanno, CSPM (IPMA-B), Cert.APM, PMP, PMI-ACP, CSM, CSP, FPMAC, FAPM

Trying to implement agile DevOps in a traditional DevOps environment is a huge challenge without first changing underlying governance practices. In this article, the author explains why--and identifies some success factors.

Preparing Teams for Different Ways of Working

by Andy Jordan

As more and more organizations recognize they need both agile and waterfall project execution processes in order to succeed, teams are being asked to work in very different ways.

Project Management – Fast and Slow

by Klaus Nielsen, MBA, PMI-ACP, PMI-RMP, PMP

How do the biases, effects, fallacies, illusions and neglects outlined in Kahneman’s Thinking, Fast and Slow (2013) affect decision making? By applying Kahneman to the Knowledge Areas of the PMBOK® Guide, the author illustrates how project managers can mitigate the effects of irrational thinking.

Collaboration as a Productivity Booster

by Mike Griffiths

Are command-and-control undertones hurting your organization's performance? Are people getting the passion and desire to contribute slowly crushed out of them by project management bureaucracy and prescriptive process? Then free them to be hyper-productive by emphasizing collaboration.

Four Elephants in the Agile Testing Room

by Paul Carvalho

Some topics in agile testing may point to dysfunctional organizational practices that are often taboo, off limits or avoided in regular conversations. In this article, we identify four such topics that need to be discussed and addressed for agile success.

Self-Managed Waterfall?

by Andy Jordan

One of the cornerstones of agile is the concept of self-managed teams. Does that concept translate into more traditional project areas?

The Key to Greater Organizational Agility

by Braden Kelley

Companies seeking to cope with the pace of accelerating change are looking for ways to go faster, and managers in non-technical disciplines have become increasingly infatuated with the agile software development methodology. Agility sounds like a good thing, and agile marketing sounds like it must be better than regular marketing...but is it?

How to Stay Agile in a "Wagile" Environment

by Gopinath Venu, PMP, PMI-ACP

The transformation from waterfall to agile frequently meets with resistance to change. Many startups who want to embrace an agile approach fall into a vicious trap of a blended methodology often called “Wagile.” Learn how to encourage development of an agile mindset in your organization.

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