Methods

Agility and Values-Based Leadership (Part 2): Focus

by Andrew Burns

This is the second in a five-part series of articles regarding agile frameworks based on values, principles and practices. Scrum espouses five values: courage, openness, respect, commitment and focus. In this series, each article will explore one of these values--on which a deeper discussion of principles and practices assembles.

Agile Risk Management

by Mike Griffiths

Agile approaches do not have risk management approaches built in as standard; they have the integration points, but not the steps required. Fortunately, with a little effort, we can fill those gaps and equip teams with the skills they need to address risks and opportunities effectively.

Principles

Topic Teasers Vol. 82: Balancing Business Analysts

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP, PMI-PBA

Question: After being team lead for our Customer Operations business unit transformation project, I’ve been offered a position to head the new department. It will now also include Information Technology (IT). Here’s my issue up front: I’m a traditional project manager and now I’ll have nine business analysts and an agile IT team to lead. Who is responsible for what on projects now? I need to figure this out fast.
A. Business analysts replace project managers, so once you assign a BA to a project, your work is over. All you will need to do is help referee the conflicts between the BAs and the IT teams.
B. If your business analysts are trained and certified, they’ll know their own roles or can adjust quickly to what you want them to do. The agile IT team should be fairly self-directed. All you need to understand is who does what, present the responsibility chart and stand back ready to support them if needed.
C. Agile teams do not need any supervision or direction over and above their own ScrumMaster, who is 100% devoted to one project at a time. Ask your BAs if they will cross-train as ScrumMasters to maximize the number of projects you can run at any one time.
D. Due to the new strategic and business requirements from PMI, project managers have now been renamed. Just have your newly christened business analysts do what project managers have always done.
Pick your answer then Test Your Knowledge!

Project Managers Still Don't 'Get' Agile

by Anthony Mersino, PMP, PMI-ACP, CSM, CSP, PSPO

If you are a traditional project manager practicing agile methods, chances are you don’t really “get” it. Nothing has been worse for the understanding and proper application of agile approaches in organizations today than the flawed thinking and actions of well-meaning middle managers and project managers.

Practices

Agility and Value-Based Leadership (Part 1): Courage

by Andrew Burns

This is the first in a five-part series of articles regarding agile frameworks based on values, principles and practices. Scrum espouses five values: courage, openness, respect, commitment and focus. In this series, each article will explore one of these values--on which a deeper discussion of principles and practices assembles.

Invitation: The Secret Tool for Distributed Agile Leaders

by Mark Kilby

With over a decade of working with cross-organizational and cross-geographical teams, this practitioner has found that “invitation” is a powerful yet little utilized technique to encourage team self-management. And self-management is not a nice-to-have, it is absolutely critical.

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