Language ≡ Sections

Methods

Agile Innovation

by Mike Griffiths

There are great opportunities for growth and deviation outside the standard agile models for stable teams who want to evolve further. This article tells the story of one team that did just that--and what other people can learn from it.

Agile Results Require Capacity Balance: Got the Courage?

by Bob Galen

By significantly reducing your number of parallel projects--focusing on fewer, and then trying to get them done--you might get better results. Why? Because multi-tasking is the enemy, and agile is a capacity equalization play.

Principles

Projects are Not Black and White: The Bimodal Buzz Ignores Reality

by Kevin Aguanno, PMP, MAPM, IPMA-B, Cert.APM, CSM, CSP

Project delivery organizations need more than just a bimodal approach. While waterfall and agile are very different delivery approaches, if you put them on a spectrum with one at each end, you will find that many projects would ideally be situated somewhere along the spectrum between those two extremes. Instead, optimal delivery would be achieved with a tetramodal delivery approach.

The Next Level of Big Visible Charts

by Klaus Nielsen, MBA, PMI-ACP, PMI-RMP, PMP

Information radiator is the generic term for any of a number of handwritten, drawn, printed or electronic displays that a team places in a highly visible location. It conveys the latest information at a glance. Learn how your team can foster collaboration through visible project management and implementing radiators.

Practices

Methodologies for Effective Project Management: A Review

by Sreekumar Menon

Adopting and maintaining an appropriate project methodology is vital for organizational success. The purpose of this article is to explore and analyze project methodologies that find common application in effective project management.

Topic Teasers Vol. 60: Adding to Agile Proposals

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP

Question: In our attempt to move to an agile-driven organization, management has asked my team to be involved with responding to a proposal that, if we get it, could provide an increase of 50% in our gross income this year. Since we’ve always complained that we weren’t consulted before contracts were signed, now the pressure is on for us to be very wise regarding what we add to the company’s submission. Are there any rules of proposal development for agile teams?
A. Yes. Just like rules for creating speeches can make the difference between wowing the crowd and expounding to a bored audience, learn the correct way to write proposals. Hint: It is better to win the business than look good and have a fancy document.
B. Yes. Many colleges and universities have degrees in contract writing. At least one person on the team should have at least 12 hours of formal education before you include the team’s ideas in the proposal. The good thing is that this training can also be used for PDUs.
C. No. Those who become skilled in contract negotiation and responding to proposals are housed in a special procurement department. They have eked out their skill sets through years on the job. While you can sit in on meetings, don’t risk looking foolish. Always defer to their ideas and decisions.
D. No. There is so much political intrigue and price fixing involved in Request for Proposals (RFP) or other versions of how organizations solicit bids that not much depends on the actual proposal submitted by your organization. See if anyone on your team knows anyone in the potential customer organization who could leverage the decision to your advantage.
Pick your answer then Test Your Knowledge!

ADVERTISEMENTS

"Do not worry about your difficulties in Mathematics. I can assure you mine are still greater."

- Albert Einstein