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Methods

Managing Quality in Agile Projects: Your Three-Part Checklist

by Paul Carvalho

Managing quality during a software development project can be difficult and time consuming when you have been misinformed about true quality indicators and practices. Actively managing quality on an agile project can be both simpler and harder than traditional approaches. Here are some basic practices to save time and unnecessary rework--and improve stakeholder satisfaction before and after delivery.

Agile Pendentives

by Mike Griffiths

Project managers need to communicate effectively with all types of project stakeholders. For agile projects, this sometimes involves adapting traditional PM constructs into the closest agile alternatives. Agile pendentives are adaptive patterns that facilitate these traditional-to-agile discussions.

Principles

The Agile Certification Landscape

by Kevin Aguanno, PMP, MAPM, IPMA-B, Cert.APM, CSM, CSP

The number of agile certifications available in the market keeps growing, and one must consider the unique needs of the inquiring company or individual to know what would be best for them. What factors should you consider? Do you even know the options available?

Can Agile Drive Sustainability?

by Andy Jordan

Agile approaches often have greater engagement levels between stakeholders. While those conversations generally focus on the deliverables and how they meet the customer’s needs, can they also drive sustainability best practices?

Practices

Compliance in an Agile World

by Bernadette Dario, Bhushan Rele

Agile does not enforce rigid processes, but organizations typically choose a guiding framework and a set of practices that serve as the starting point of an agile transformation. Executives typically want to know where teams are in terms of adopting these new ways of working. This article provides three techniques--individual, team and group--that can be used to assess the agile adoption level, monitor progress and drive improvements.

User Stories: Ready, Set, Go!

by Bob Galen

Have you ever entered a sprint taking on a user story that you later regretted? What can be done to prevent this frustration? Is there a technique that will prevent this from happening, or are these teams doomed to keep repeating their mistakes?

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"Truth comes out of error more readily than out of confusion."

- Francis Bacon