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Methods

Planning and Managing Development Projects: The Hybrid Way

by Michael Wood

The risk we take in swearing allegiance to a specific approach is that following the approach often becomes more important than achieving the goal of the project. Let’s explore the merits of using the best of different approaches—and how marrying them into a hybrid model impacts the way projects are planned and managed.

The Best of Both Worlds

by Kevin Coleman

If you have not run a hybrid project leveraging agile and waterfall methodologies, you are in for a great learning experience. Let’s put the two distinctively different approaches into a broad and high-level context…

Principles

Does Hybrid Project Management Mean a Hybrid Team?

by Andy Jordan

As hybrid projects become more common, what has to change among team members, and how do we manage that change? Do we have to minimize these disruption scenarios, or can we create an environment where teams are more comfortable with the shifts?

How to Demonstrate Trustworthiness: A Key Success Factor for Distributed Agile Teams

by Mark Kilby

The best agile software teams communicate well, push hard to meet deadlines, support each other when struggling with issues, and go above and beyond to maintain quality. The key element is trustworthiness. In this article, the writer provides a self-assessment tool that will allow you and your team members to assess and demonstrate trustworthiness over time.

Practices

Topic Teasers Vol. 77: Agile Non-Functional Requirements

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP

Question: We have switched to agile practices and, if I do say so myself, I think we are doing an awesome job. However, even though we are carefully creating backlog lists and writing user stories, more often than not our end product or service still does not meet the expectations of our internal and external customers. Has something been left out of what we were taught?
A. Agile does provide a way to use non-functional requirements in its methodology, but often it is overlooked or not stressed when new teams are preparing their first few projects. Make a point to add them into your new process.
B. The reason agile projects are completed so much faster and provide so much more value is that with the Scrum practice methodology, it is no longer necessary to consider vague things like non-functional requirements. If they aren’t going to function anyway, why bother with them.
C. User stories are only written if there is a need for outside personas to be created to represent users. Non-functional requirements are the ones assigned to those personas who would not be interested in your product or service, and therefore can be excluded from consideration.
D. Many projects have both functional and non-functional requirements that impact the outcome of the project. That is why only traditional processes should be used. Agile processes work only on software projects, and then only when there is an absence of non-functional requirements to be considered.
Pick your answer then Test Your Knowledge!

Moving from Traditional to Agile DevOps

by Kevin Aguanno, PMP, MAPM, IPMA-B, Cert.APM, CSM, CSP

Trying to implement agile DevOps in a traditional DevOps environment is a huge challenge without first changing underlying governance practices. In this article, the author explains why--and identifies some success factors.

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