Language ≡ Sections

Methods

Is Your Daily Standup Meeting Hurting Teamwork?

by Gil Broza

In its popular, standard form, the Daily Scrum (“the Standup”) hurts teamwork. Follow this PM to understand how and why the meeting causes that--and discover alternatives that work better.

Topic Teasers Vol. 52: Calculating Agile Capacity

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP

Question: After a recent conversion by my team regarding agile, we find that there is a mismatch between the number of hours we should have for working on stories and the amount of time we really have. So we are constantly over-committing to our Product Owner and not delivering. Where are we going wrong?
A. Traditional teams may have a 15-20% contingency cushion in time and cost on their project estimates. Routinely subtract a similar agile contingency from the number of backlog items you accept to make sure you finish all planned work within a single iteration.
B. Agile is expected to be flexible, and velocity can vary. Just complete what you can and adjust your velocity for the next sprint if you don’t finish all of the stories you committed to complete this time.
C. Be sure you are acknowledging hours that team members will spend in Scrum ceremonies, personal time commitments and non-team directed organizational work before calculating the capacity for this iteration.
D. Ask the ScrumMaster to speak to anyone on the team who did not finish his or her work during the previous iteration. This person is making the team look bad and should be disciplined if it happens again.
Pick your answer then Test Your Knowledge!

Principles

An Insight on the Key Inspect and Adapt Cycle: The Retrospectives

by Madhavi Ledalla, PMP

A retrospective is a special meeting during which the team gathers after completing an increment of work to inspect and adapt their methods and teamwork. Retrospectives enable whole-team learning, act as catalysts for change and generate action. This article presents some of the reasons why the retrospective’s efficacy can fade over time and then discusses some interesting techniques to keep them lively.

From a Fixed to Agile Mindset: How to Make the Transition

by Johanna Rothman

In agile, we often think of having an experimental mindset where we try something, measure the results, retrospect and replan. We need to do that for our projects. And, as agile leaders, we need to do even more. We need to have the agile mindset.

Practices

Quality Project Management: A History Lesson

by Mike Griffiths

How do we define quality as a project manager? Is it managing a project really well, or managing a successful project? How about managing a successful project really well? That sounds pretty good. However, it poses the next question: What is a successful project? Let’s look at some examples of project success, failure and ambiguity.

Agile Adoption: Changing Behavior by Asking the Right Questions

by George Dinwiddie

Successful agile development requires that people collaborate in self-organizing their own work. Being told how to do that is counterproductive, yet waiting for them to discover agile practices that work can take a very long time, perhaps forever. What’s a manager to do?

ADVERTISEMENTS

"Man prefers to believe what he prefers to be true."

- Francis Bacon