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The Next Level of Big Visible Charts

by Klaus Nielsen, MBA, PMI-ACP, PMI-RMP, PMP

Information radiator is the generic term for any of a number of handwritten, drawn, printed or electronic displays that a team places in a highly visible location. It conveys the latest information at a glance. Learn how your team can foster collaboration through visible project management and implementing radiators.

Harvesting Innovative Ideas

by Debasis Roy

Need a new way to reach across bureaucratic confines and uncover innovative ideas in your organization? Try peer sourcing, a great way to get the best from your team.

Topic Teasers Vol. 61: Taming Team Testiness

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP

Question: With more teams (some agile and some waterfall), more customer and management involvement, and younger workers who are not as subservient to position power, the team landscape in my department has become a minefield. It’s not just the project manager or ScrumMaster who needs to know how to tame the conflicts--it’s each and every one of us. Short of major psychotherapy sessions, how do we start?
A. Complaining and unhappiness are a necessary part of working with other people. If it happens to you, just back down and you can vent your frustration at home tonight. Addressing conflict at work is unhealthy and will derail your career.
B. There are some simple techniques and verbal steps you can learn so that you are prepared to soothe troubled relationships regardless of whether it’s colleague to colleague, team member to customer or manager to employee. Study them.
C. Ask the Human Resources department to arrange for a counselor to come into the department and work with all the employees. The ones that really need it won’t realize it’s for them, and the rest of the people who don’t need it may find something they can use at home.
D. Go online and download a series of positive posters, sayings and cartoons to post in your workspace to lighten the atmosphere. If people can identify with one of the printouts, they may realize how they look to others and stop their disruptive behavior.
Pick your answer then Test Your Knowledge!

Communication Before Big Project Change (Part 2)

by Joe Wynne

When big changes are afoot, there are two points where communication is critical. The key success factor is to get information out as fast as possible. Before you know it, it will be time to pass on another wave of information at the next critical point--the focus of our concluding installment.

Criticizing the Right Way in Projects

by Kenneth Darter, PMP

Nothing stops a project team faster than negative criticism. While there is a time for criticism, it is important that it not stop the project team or derail the work that has been done. In order to do this the right way, the project manager needs to be working closely with the project team and stay aware of what is going on at all times.

The Seinfeld Strategy

by Patti Gilchrist, PMP

As a project manager, do you have a recognition strategy in place? If not, you may want to tune in to repeat episodes of Seinfeld to learn the consequences from Jerry's mistake of refusing to say "thank you".

Change Management: Keeping It Off the Agenda!

by Paul Baumgartner, PMP

Change management should be straightforward and natural for the project manager. So why does it become a much-discussed topic in so many lessons-learned workshops? Where do we go wrong as project managers?

Communication Before Big Project Change (Part 1)

by Joe Wynne

When big changes are afoot (or rumored), there are two points where communication is critical. Waiting until more is known will simply result in workforce issues, stakeholder anger and reputation problems. Instead, be ready to stay ahead of the issues by knowing the two critical points when communication is possible--and how to know what to communicate.

Motivational Action Plan

PREMIUM deliverable

If you're having trouble with your team, this might be a good time to check in on their motivation and take some positive action. Here's a plan to get everyone back on the right track.

Project HEADWAY Project Issues Log

PREMIUM deliverable

On projects where you have more than a handful of issues, it is helpful to have a log that you can use to easily track and understand the status of an each one. The log keeps issues at a very high-level while the details are left to the project issue identification form. Project Issue logs are often used on medium to larger projects.

Project HEADWAY Project Team Status Report

PREMIUM deliverable
by Interthink

On many projects, each team is required to submit a status report indicating their progress on their portion of the project. The report ensures the key information required by the project manager is captured from each team in a consistent and complete fashion.

Employee Feedback Planner

PREMIUM deliverable

Use this form to prepare and organize more useful feedback for team members and other people involved in your team.

Project HEADWAY Communications Plan

PREMIUM deliverable
by Interthink

This template allows the project manager to fully understand the communication needs of stakeholders on the project. Stakeholders expectations and requirements can be documented ensuring there is a clear understanding of the why, when, how and what of the project’s communications.

Agoraphobia: The Fear and Loathing of Open-Space Offices

by Mike Griffiths

Agile methods recommend co-location and face-to-face communications, but studies of office workers show high levels of dissatisfaction with open-plan environments. So, how do we make agile work and minimize the issues surrounding open-plan environments?

The Project Manager as Knowledge Broker

by Paul Baumgartner, PMP

Does project management just boil down to the right knowledge getting to the right people? Project success hinges exactly upon that, with a highly empowered project manager leading the way.

Managing Change in Large Teams

by Kenneth Darter, PMP

When you are dealing with large teams, implementing change in projects can be difficult--and must be controlled carefully so it won’t spin out of control.

Communicate, Collaborate and Worry!

by Subhash Nigam

Who said worrying was unhealthy? Project managers must maintain a healthy amount of skepticism going into any project. It prepares us to be better “event planners”--and even better managers who must overcome hurdles to deliver value for the project's stakeholders.

Methods to Stop Meeting Madness (Part 3): Why You Need Process Agendas

by Dan Furlong, PMP, PMI-ACP, MBA, CSM

For any meeting--such as those using method or adaptive agendas that require steps, materials or supplies to be used--a process agenda is critical to your success. The process agenda provides the “how” of a meeting, whereby the meeting agenda itself defines the “what”. Get some help in the concluding installment of our three-part series.

Methods to Stop Meeting Madness (Part 2): What’s Your Agenda?

by Dan Furlong, PMP, PMI-ACP, MBA, CSM

As our series continues to help you alleviate meeting madness, we talk about the various types of meetings we attend and how the agenda format should take the meeting purpose into account--and how nearly all meetings can be grouped into one of four categories.

PMOs: You Must Have Presence!

by Dan Furlong, PMP, PMI-ACP, MBA, CSM

PMOs frequently find themselves in front of an audience--sometimes as a meeting facilitator, sometimes as a presenter and sometimes as a motivational speaker. It is critical that as a PMO you have “presence” if you are to be the most effective leader you can be--and why would you want anything else?

Methods to Stop Meeting Madness?

by Dan Furlong, PMP, PMI-ACP, MBA, CSM

As project managers we are often asked to attend “urgent” meetings on short notice. More times than not, these meetings are poorly run, inadequately attended, stray off topic and include too many topics to manage in the period allotted. Life does not have to be this way.

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"Don't compromise yourself. You are all you've got."

- Janis Joplin