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From Turkeys to Agile Eagles

by Michael Aucoin

While there is almost unanimous agreement on the importance of teams, the vast majority of people don’t like to belong to them. This raises a loud warning for you and your agile team, one you must address proactively, because an agile project succeeds or fails on the health of the team. Maybe the GCCR Plan can give your team members wings that fly.

CRM = Customers Really Matter

by Rob Saxon

Rigor in process around project management is not enough to stay professionally relevant. In fact, the nature of our work is such that process may not need to be our primary focus. One PM shares how certain situations can inform us about when process should be emphasized and when relationships should matter more.

Opening Day PM: How to Start on a New Project

by Mike Donoghue

Starting a project is difficult. It's important as a PM to establish who you are as a person in the beginning, particularly with respect to how you will treat the project work and the individuals who will be involved in the process.

Social Media Policy: Protecting Yourself and Your Project Team

by Mike Donoghue

In our technology-rich activities, it is important for companies to enact a social media policy in order to protect sensitive data, corporate networks and other important online information. Keep these recommendations in mind when creating a policy.

Motivating the ‘Who Cares?’ Resource

by Andy Jordan

Not everyone shares your enthusiasm for the project, and that's a problem that can impact the entire team. But you still need these unmotivated managers. What can you do when someone on your team is determined to do as little work as possible?

Brewing Effective PMO Communications

by Chi-Pong Wong

Status sharing is key to PMO success, and newsletters have become the favorite transmission for managers to stay on top of milestones. Get help with your communications using TEAPOT--every PMO chef’s magic potion.

Topic Teasers Vol. 29: Ugly Team Emotions

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP

Question: I feel quite confident in my project skills and hold several certifications. However, my team seems to frequently have ugly emotions present themselves to me, pass between teammates and appear in our group meetings. How do I deal with these to keep them from destroying relationships and impeding the work of the project?
A. Send offending team members to Human Resources and ask that they be given a free psychological evaluation. Since the behavior is impacting project work, this will be company money well-spent.
B. Go to the individual and ask if he or she would prefer to work on another team. Take the responsibility for their behavior, as it must be a negative response to you as a project manager.
C. Ignore the offensive behavior. Your job it to get the deliverables of the project completed in a timely way. Any time you spend dealing with misbehavior is time stolen from productive project work.
D. Write down the emotions you surmise are behind the negative behaviors and think through appropriate responses ahead of time so that you are prepared when they occur.
Pick your answer then Test Your Knowledge!

CRM: Of Customers and Crises

by Laura Burford

A client project is a disaster, and they want to cancel the project. Would you be willing to step in as project manager? Can you help rescue the project and rebuild the fragile client relationship? Employ crisis skills to find success.

Bear in Mind: Influence and Leadership for Stakeholder Management

by Michael Nir

It's vital to never forget the significance of stakeholder management. This chapter from Project Management: Influence and Leadership Building Rapport in Teams presents a discussion about stakeholder management and the notion that stakeholders differ in their perceptions, and also offers strategies for influence.

Back to Basics: Keeping it Simple

by Andy Jordan

For experienced PMs, sometimes the hardest job is to go right back to the very basic stuff. So how can you maximize your chances of success? And how do we manage team members who have absolutely no experience or understanding of project work?

Motivational Action Plan

PREMIUM deliverable

If you're having trouble with your team, this might be a good time to check in on their motivation and take some positive action. Here's a plan to get everyone back on the right track.

Project HEADWAY Project Issues Log

PREMIUM deliverable

On projects where you have more than a handful of issues, it is helpful to have a log that you can use to easily track and understand the status of an each one. The log keeps issues at a very high-level while the details are left to the project issue identification form. Project Issue logs are often used on medium to larger projects.

Project HEADWAY Project Team Status Report

PREMIUM deliverable

On many projects, each team is required to submit a status report indicating their progress on their portion of the project. The report ensures the key information required by the project manager is captured from each team in a consistent and complete fashion.

Employee Feedback Planner

PREMIUM deliverable

Use this form to prepare and organize more useful feedback for team members and other people involved in your team.

Project HEADWAY Communications Plan

PREMIUM deliverable

This template allows the project manager to fully understand the communication needs of stakeholders on the project. Stakeholders expectations and requirements can be documented ensuring there is a clear understanding of the why, when, how and what of the project’s communications.

Methods to Managing Customer Expectations

by Kenneth Darter, PMP

How you manage your customer’s expectations will to a great extent determine the relationship you have with them. There are many different methods and ideas on how to manage customer expectations. Which one will you choose?

PMOs: Moving Beyond the Project Resource Pool

by Andy Jordan

Portfolio management needs to begin with idea creation. But if the portfolio starts with the idea creation process, how does the PMO engage people beyond the reach of traditional project execution so that their ideas are captured?

Build a Virtual Team Work Infrastructure to Avoid Collaboration Misfires

by Joe Wynne

Virtual teams have special communication obstacles that are not necessarily solved elegantly by the communication tools available in your project. You must combine multiple applications to create an infrastructure to meet the needs of virtual teams to interact and to complete project deliverables.

Managing Virtual Projects with Success

by Jiju (Jay) Nair, PMP

A virtual team can be effective by adopting proven virtual collaboration tools, establishing team performance metrics and promoting supplementary processes that align with the organization’s project management methodology.

Remote Control: The Virtual PM

by Andy Jordan

Can a project manager manage their team virtually, and if so what adjustments are necessary? To be successful, a virtual PM has to overcome many communication-related issues. Here we explore an effective approach.

4 Virtual PM Challenges

by Kenneth Darter, PMP

A virtual project manager is physically separated from the project team, the stakeholders and perhaps even the client. How can PMs make sure they are effective in this role?

The Fortune Cookie Wisdom Guide to Project Management (Part 2)

by Ian Whittingham, PMP

No project manager would ever be so foolish as to leave the outcome of their project to chance events and simply hope they might get lucky. So it might appear odd for our guru to be looking inside a fortune cookie to find project management wisdom. But as we saw in Part 1 of his series, those simple mottoes can sometimes offer up more wisdom than first meets the eye...

Goulash Project Management

by Vilmos Rajda

Will the principles of project management work in a culture that is very different from North American culture? The author of this article just tested that in Eastern Europe...and the results are sweat, tears and smiles.

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- Jack Handey