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Protecting Project ROI for Project Sponsors

by Kent Lefner

It is critical that business leaders have the ability and courage to mitigate risk up front and actively monitor and act on project risks and performance as early warning signs materialize. Here we look at a framework to help business and project leaders actively, transparently and honestly monitor risk and issues through the entire project lifecycle.

Corporate Politics and Stakeholder Management Communication

by Alla Antoniuk

Every project has its own share of organizational politics. As a project manager, you have to be aligned with organizational goals. Manage stakeholder expectations and relationships in an agile manner in order to stay on top of the game and make sure that your team performs at the highest possible level.

Rules of Considerate Conduct and the Aspirational Standards of the PMI Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct

by Katherine Holderbaum

The aspirational standards of the “PMI Code of Ethics” provide practitioners with the “what” of professional and socially responsible conduct. Applying Forni’s Choosing Civility: The Twenty-Five Rules of Considerate Conduct can enhance the “PMI Code of Ethics” with specific actions and behavior and support more effective management of project management processes, especially communications. The discussions that may result can further benefit project managers and their teams.

Documenting Process Improvements

by Kenneth Darter, PMP

Processes are only as good as their last review. There should be a constant review cycle for ensuring that processes are improved when necessary—and documenting that is vital to the team.

Get Risks Identified…Even When It's Tough

by Joe Wynne

When the going gets tough in project risk management, you have to get tough with your tactics. Get the key participants you need in the session through proactive invitee management. Get the risks identified during the session by using pre-selected, mentally stimulating terms and phrases.

What Should You Do When Your Project Goes Wrong?

by Helena Lui

Since projects are more risky by nature than operational work, it's important to know which course of action to take when something goes wrong. In this article, the author outlines seven steps that you should follow.

How Building Information Modeling (BIM) Can Help Project Managers

by Saad Al Jabri

Building information modeling (BIM) has grown tremendously in just a few years. Meanwhile, factors are pushing the construction world to innovate opportunities for improving efficiency and productivity. In this scenario in any project, the project manager has the overall responsibility for project success.

Communication: The Leader's Language

by Suresh MK

Communication is the medium through which one articulates vision, strategy, change and feedback. It is most critical for leaders to have effective communication skills as they are the ones delivering important strategy and vision. If they fail to articulate that effectively, it could lead to unintended consequences.

Topic Teasers Vol. 80: Compliance Without Power

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP, PMI-PBA

Question: We recently developed new accounting software for internal use to create invoices. Due to interest in tracking benefits realization and also capturing customer reactions to evaluate our success, my project team has been asked to stay on and address any issues for six months. One of the sales representatives gives special discounts and terms but fails to enter them into the new system for billing, and the angry customers call my team. I’ve told his manager, but the behavior continues. It makes the process improvement statistics for our software look bad and is costing us money. What can I do?
A. If talking with the sales representative’s manager didn’t work, talk to the manager’s manager. This sales person should be fired.
B. Take the salesperson to lunch. See if there is anything bothering him. Try to help him solve any work-related or personal issues, so that he can focus more on entering the correct data for billing.
C. Alert the representative by e-mail when the invoices will be sent out for two months. Give him a deadline to enter any unique terms not covered by the default pricing tables in the software. Copy his manager.
D. Prepare a second training class on how to operate the new software and schedule all of the employees in the organization who use the software to attend. If one person isn’t using it correctly, perhaps there are more.
Pick your answer then Test Your Knowledge!

Accepting Unrealistic Deadlines: A Recipe for Disaster

by Muhammad Umais Mulki

Sometimes the temptation to work on an exciting project—and other times the pressure from the business executives to get the business—leads to agreement on unrealistic expectations. This article discusses the mistake of agreeing to unrealistic timelines and suggests a few ways on how this can be avoided—and the project kept under reasonable control.

Motivational Action Plan

PREMIUM deliverable
by Dave Garrett

If you're having trouble with your team, this might be a good time to check in on their motivation and take some positive action. Here's a plan to get everyone back on the right track.

Project HEADWAY Project Issues Log

deliverable
by Interthink

On projects where you have more than a handful of issues, it is helpful to have a log that you can use to easily track and understand the status of an each one. The log keeps issues at a very high-level while the details are left to the project issue identification form. Project Issue logs are often used on medium to larger projects.

Project HEADWAY Project Team Status Report

PREMIUM deliverable
by Interthink

On many projects, each team is required to submit a status report indicating their progress on their portion of the project. The report ensures the key information required by the project manager is captured from each team in a consistent and complete fashion.

Employee Feedback Planner

PREMIUM deliverable

Use this form to prepare and organize more useful feedback for team members and other people involved in your team.

Project HEADWAY Communications Plan

PREMIUM deliverable
by Interthink

This template allows the project manager to fully understand the communication needs of stakeholders on the project. Stakeholders expectations and requirements can be documented ensuring there is a clear understanding of the why, when, how and what of the project’s communications.

Embracing Mistakes: Learning from Experience

by Jon Quigley, Shawn P. Quigley

Failure to learn from mistakes--and from each other--can cost organizations dearly. Learning and adapting are hallmarks of good project management and of functioning organizations. Making mistakes is not a problem--it's how we learn.

The Top 10 Reasons Projects Fail (Part 2)

by Marc Lacroix

While we all generally know what a pitfall is in the business world and understand that they should be avoided, the most obvious traps are still sometimes the ones we fall into—especially when managing projects with dozens of competing priorities that distract us and take our eyes off the trail ahead. This two-part article series identifies the top 10 reasons projects fail and focuses on how to avoid these common project management pitfalls.

Team Members: The PM's Critical Communications Channel

by Suvrutt Gurjar

We always give a great deal of attention to project communications with senior management, customers and sponsors. But in order to make the project and all of these stakeholders successful, the project manager needs to diligently nurture one more channel: project communications to and from project team members.

Self-Service for Your Project Website: Do's and Don'ts

by Joe Wynne

The wise project manager knows how to use the right tools in the right way to communicate to different groups. When using a web share to present and document information, there are some important do's and don’ts to be aware of to ensure success.

The Top 10 Reasons Projects Fail (Part 1)

by Marc Lacroix

While we all generally know what a pitfall is in the business world and understand that they should be avoided, the most obvious traps are still sometimes the ones we fall into—especially when managing projects with dozens of competing priorities that distract us and take our eyes off the trail ahead. This two-part article series identifies the top 10 reasons projects fail and focuses on how to avoid these common project management pitfalls.

Digital PM Controls: Low-Tech/High-Touch vs. High-Tech/Low-Touch

by Mike Griffiths

Project management tools are getting more and more sophisticated as they compete with rivals on features and spread to support more platforms. Yet sophistication has a cost. Let's explore how a combination of deliberately low-tech inputs and outputs can be used with modern tools to deliver the best of both worlds.

7 Tips for Choosing Collaboration Tools

by Elizabeth Harrin

Are you looking for a project management collaboration tool? There are plenty out there to choose from. Here are seven tips to narrow down your selection.

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