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Advance Your Career

Special Agile CoP Leadership call

PREMIUM on-demand webinar

In this unrehearsed call, Joseph Flahiff will coach Liza Wood through the issue she decides to bring. Joseph has done no preparation, and does not know the problem that Liza is going to bring. This is just what it is like when team member comes to a coach for a 1:1 session.

Improvisation and Agile Project Management

PREMIUM on-demand webinar

Agile PM is one of the emerging ‘hot topics’ in the PM domain, and given the breakdown of the ‘plan – then execute’ model in Project Management, the adept project manager is constantly having to improvise to deliver against changing project deliverables. This webinar considers and compares Agile PM and Organizational Improvisation, and offers assistance with moving PM execution from the ‘tools and techniques’ based PMBOK® model towards techniques better equipped to deal with today’s ambiguous and changing project environments.

Save Time With Tools + Templates

Risk Management Grid

PREMIUM deliverable

The Risk Management Grid is a technique to identify potential risk events that could impact one of more of the project’s Seven Win Conditions. Importantly, it also serves to decide how those events will be prevented or mitigated.

The Three-Sentence Project Skinny

PREMIUM deliverable

The Three-Sentence Project Skinny is a concise summary of the purpose of the project. It addresses the what and the why.

Project Ins and Outs

PREMIUM deliverable

You can't do everything, nor should you. This template helps you figure out what is in and what is out of your project.

Project Imperatives

PREMIUM deliverable

These are the do-or-die, must-meet requirements in order for the project to be considered a success. As such, they are continuously focused on by the project manager and core team.

The Seven Win Conditions

PREMIUM deliverable

Win Conditions address how success will be measured. How do you stack up when it comes to stakeholder satisfaction, your schedule, scope, quality, budget, ROI and team satisfaction? This template helps you rank priorities, and provides areas for metrics and descriptions.

Learn From Others

Are You Ready to Go Agile? (Part 2 of 3)

by Kevin Aguanno, PMP, MAPM, IPMA-B, Cert.APM, CSM, CSP

This second article continues the discussion by looking at the second group of factors related to the readiness (and willingness) of the project team to adopt agile best practices. As with sponsorship factors, we need to consider cultural, structural and management aspects.

Are You Ready to Go Agile? (Part 1 of 3)

by Kevin Aguanno, PMP, MAPM, IPMA-B, Cert.APM, CSM, CSP

Many organizations have struggled with their early agile experiments. Due to the issues faced, they typically cannot answer the simple question: “Are we ready to go agile?” This first article examines the factors that indicate whether the sponsoring organization is ready (and able) to modify the way it works to increase the chances of a successful agile project.

Applying Agile to Emergent Projects

by Johanna Rothman

Most of us work on projects where we know the end date or the budget--or both. But there is a category of projects where we might not know either: emergent projects. Emergent projects are change projects such as your agile transition or any other project that you have no control over. Can you apply agile to those projects? Yes. Carefully.

Debunking Myths about Product Managers

by Ken Whitaker

Project teams quite often assume that the product manager is a true partner--and when a project is under scrutiny or stress, the product manager can transform into a very tough adversary and oftentimes a combative stakeholder. Put yourself in a product manager’s shoes for a change! Let’s explore a couple of myths about product managers that should hopefully spark a new level of collaboration and success…

The Economics of Compassion in the New Economy

by Mike Griffiths

Being nice is not a courtesy or even a basis for competitive advantage anymore. In today’s connected workplace with a less loyal and more mobile workforce, the economics of compassion are very real. See what smart companies are doing to recruit and retain the best talent.

Getting People to Do the Right Thing

by Gil Broza

Every aspect of product development can be done better or worse. That includes being a team player, writing code, communicating requirements, testing functionality...you name it. But how do you ensure that people do the best thing? And, can you even do that? That is, can you somehow force good practice? And what can you expect to happen by doing so?

Three Practical Guidelines for Business Decisions

by Michael Nir

It is a practical approach to understanding why decisions are so complex and what can be done about it. In order to create the combination between top-down problem decisions (waterfall-like approaches) and local problem decisions (agile-project approach), here are three practical guidelines.

The Dangers of Visual Project Management

by Mike Griffiths

...or, how a picture can divert 1,000 eyes. Pictures are cool. They aid discussion and unite comprehension. They also allow us to avoid having to read volumes of text. As such, they are the convenience food of project management. Easy to consume, but are they nutritious?

Use Cases or User Stories: Where Should Agile Teams Start?

by Kevin Aguanno, PMP, MAPM, IPMA-B, Cert.APM, CSM, CSP

Should an agile team begin with requirements documented as use cases or user stories? Proponents from both sides of the debate make good arguments, leading to confusion for many who are just getting started with agile practices.

Topic Teasers Vol. 38: Misunderstood Prototyping

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP

Question: Our manager resists my agile team using prototyping. She believes that the time spent on the prototype takes time away from completing the work we are supposed to deliver during the early iterations. How do we convince her that in the long run, it saves the organization time and money to use this technique?
A. Using company time and resources to create a prototype wastes money and delays the actual completion of a shippable or deployable product or software. Listen to your manager. She is in that position because she knows more than you do.
B. Managers do not always “hear” unless you speak in their own language and frame practices from the “What’s in it for me?” point of view. Find a good non-software example with budget numbers she can relate to and then translate this to substantiate why you think prototyping is almost mandatory in your situation.
C. If you are not allowed to use prototypes when they are clearly called for, work with your team to slow down the velocity of your output. When asked by the product owner or external customer the reason for the delay, point the finger at your manager.
D. Explain to your manager that she does not know how to develop software. Convey that a firm part of every Scrum cycle is to develop a prototype before moving on to do other user stories in the product backlog.
Pick your answer then Test Your Knowledge!


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Discussion Rules

Recent Questions

Topic Originator Last Post New Total
can anyone recommend a project management tool for managing Agile projects?  Sanjay Lala  Oct 22, '14 3:49 PM 
What Metrics does your PMO request?   Joseph Flahiff  Oct 17, '14 2:11 AM 
  Mark All Read
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