Top Influencers

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Upcoming Webinars

Kaikaku - Projects in Innovative Environments

May 20, 2016 12:00 PM EDT (UTC-4)
PREMIUM webinar

This webinar is about making project management and innovation to co-exist through better understanding concepts around Kaizen and Kaikaku.

On-demand Webinars

Scrum in the Waterfall

PREMIUM on-demand webinar
by Dave Prior

Just because you are working in a waterfall organization doesn't mean you can't be Agile. Join Dave Prior as he walks you through a case study on implementing Scrum in a waterfall environment. He offers some key practices and data points that will enable you to be successful in both keeping the team productive and providing the information needed to build trust and confidence with the Project Sponsors and Senior Executives you need to support your Agile implementation.

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Save Time With Tools And Templates

Kaikaku - Projects in Innovative Environments

May 20, 2016 12:00 PM EDT (UTC-4)
PREMIUM webinar

This webinar is about making project management and innovation to co-exist through better understanding concepts around Kaizen and Kaikaku.

Learn From Others

Topic Teasers Vol. 77: Agile Non-Functional Requirements

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP

Question: We have switched to agile practices and, if I do say so myself, I think we are doing an awesome job. However, even though we are carefully creating backlog lists and writing user stories, more often than not our end product or service still does not meet the expectations of our internal and external customers. Has something been left out of what we were taught?
A. Agile does provide a way to use non-functional requirements in its methodology, but often it is overlooked or not stressed when new teams are preparing their first few projects. Make a point to add them into your new process.
B. The reason agile projects are completed so much faster and provide so much more value is that with the Scrum practice methodology, it is no longer necessary to consider vague things like non-functional requirements. If they aren’t going to function anyway, why bother with them.
C. User stories are only written if there is a need for outside personas to be created to represent users. Non-functional requirements are the ones assigned to those personas who would not be interested in your product or service, and therefore can be excluded from consideration.
D. Many projects have both functional and non-functional requirements that impact the outcome of the project. That is why only traditional processes should be used. Agile processes work only on software projects, and then only when there is an absence of non-functional requirements to be considered.
Pick your answer then Test Your Knowledge!

Agile Iterations: Why Bother?

by Gil Broza

Teams run into trouble when they adopt agile practices without really knowing why they are doing them. This can happen when people who’ve been told to use iterations (sprints) still don’t understand why. And when they act on these statements, they unknowingly undermine their efforts to use agile. What can we do?

Handling Interruptions in Scrum: 4 Options (Part 2)

by Gene Gendel

In an ideal world, a cross-functional Scrum team must be fully focused on Scrum. The team is also expected to hear a voice of one customer only: the product owner. But what happens when reality intervenes and you get pulled in other directions? As our two-part series concludes, we look at the remaining two ways of interrupting Scrum sprints--and share what can be done about them.

Handling Interruptions in Scrum: 4 Options (Part 1)

by Gene Gendel

In an ideal world, a cross-functional Scrum team must be fully focused on Scrum. The team is also expected to hear a voice of one customer only: the product owner. But what happens when reality intervenes and you get pulled in other directions?

Agile Innovation

by Mike Griffiths

There are great opportunities for growth and deviation outside the standard agile models for stable teams who want to evolve further. This article tells the story of one team that did just that--and what other people can learn from it.

The Agile Certification Landscape

by Kevin Aguanno, PMP, MAPM, IPMA-B, Cert.APM, CSM, CSP

The number of agile certifications available in the market keeps growing, and one must consider the unique needs of the inquiring company or individual to know what would be best for them. What factors should you consider? Do you even know the options available?

User Stories: Ready, Set, Go!

by Bob Galen

Have you ever entered a sprint taking on a user story that you later regretted? What can be done to prevent this frustration? Is there a technique that will prevent this from happening, or are these teams doomed to keep repeating their mistakes?

Is Your Daily Standup Meeting Hurting Teamwork?

by Gil Broza

In its popular, standard form, the Daily Scrum (“the Standup”) hurts teamwork. Follow this PM to understand how and why the meeting causes that--and discover alternatives that work better.

Topic Teasers Vol. 52: Calculating Agile Capacity

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP

Question: After a recent conversion by my team regarding agile, we find that there is a mismatch between the number of hours we should have for working on stories and the amount of time we really have. So we are constantly over-committing to our Product Owner and not delivering. Where are we going wrong?
A. Traditional teams may have a 15-20% contingency cushion in time and cost on their project estimates. Routinely subtract a similar agile contingency from the number of backlog items you accept to make sure you finish all planned work within a single iteration.
B. Agile is expected to be flexible, and velocity can vary. Just complete what you can and adjust your velocity for the next sprint if you don’t finish all of the stories you committed to complete this time.
C. Be sure you are acknowledging hours that team members will spend in Scrum ceremonies, personal time commitments and non-team directed organizational work before calculating the capacity for this iteration.
D. Ask the ScrumMaster to speak to anyone on the team who did not finish his or her work during the previous iteration. This person is making the team look bad and should be disciplined if it happens again.
Pick your answer then Test Your Knowledge!


Ask a Question

Discussion Rules

Recent Questions

Topic Originator Last Post Votes Replies
CBAP vrs PMI-BA  George Lewis  May 2, '16 7:02 AM  16 
How to use Github for managing User Stories?  Rudolf Olah  Apr 30, '16 10:39 PM 
PMI-ACP vrs CSM  George Lewis  Apr 19, '16 5:38 AM  23 
Progressive Elaboration vs Rolling Wave Planning  George Lewis  Apr 12, '16 12:06 PM  10 
Team Velocity vs Capacity Planning  Gnana Sekaran  Apr 8, '16 7:30 AM 
PMI-ACP® Terms Relay Race !  VenkatramVasi M  Mar 4, '16 12:10 AM  86 
Which certification should i choose?  Dhinesh Muralidharan  Feb 3, '16 11:36 AM  14 
What PM methodologies increase project success rates?  Stéphane Parent  Jan 21, '16 7:05 AM  21 
Agile Contracts and Compliance  Bryan Campbell  Jan 14, '16 10:45 AM 
Scrum   arlene trimble  Feb 29, '16 5:24 PM 
Scrum defintion and industry application  Udeme Akpan  Nov 29, '15 11:14 AM 
SCRUM Certifications in Market  Suhail Iqbal  Sep 2, '15 3:47 AM 
Scrum/Business Alignment  Kathy Sundholm  Jun 29, '15 4:53 PM 
Examples of non-IT/software Scrum implementation and uses  Federico Varchavsky  Apr 16, '15 7:42 PM 
  Mark All Read
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