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PMO: Collaborate or Perish

by Jiju (Jay) Nair, PMP

When the dust settles on the question of how to make PMOs deliver successful projects, only one question remains: How effective was the level of collaboration between a project manager, other shared groups and the PMO?

Recovering from Project Failure

by Andy Jordan

Major project failure can happen to anyone. What’s important is to make sure that the organization can recover from such a situation, and that requires both advance planning (it’s too late to start planning the recovery when the disaster has already happened) and strong execution. Is your PMO prepared?

Project Governance: Overcoming Obstacles

by Michael Wood

One of the primary roles of the PMO is to provide a framework for ensuring proper governance over projects. Here we look at some of the obstacles and challenges facing the PMO governance function--and some tips for overcoming them.

Who Owns Benefit Measurement?

by Andy Jordan

How does your organization ensure that benefits realization occurs? For so many projects, there is never any measurement of whether projected gains were actually achieved. In this article, we look at how the PMO can assist in improving that situation.

The Professional Services PMO

by Andy Jordan

One manager's clients asked him to assist with improving the effectiveness of their PMO. They made it clear that the office was only responsible for the professional services arm of the business--and they weren’t prepared to discuss extending the scope of the PMO to include the product development team. Read on for more on this unique situation...

The PMO in Operations

by Kenneth Darter, PMP

The project management office has a different role in the operational team than in project teams. In general, there are two major reasons for having a PMO as part of the operational team--and it's up to the PMO to ensure that it is supporting operations instead of hindering them.

Learning Lessons Early

by Brad Egeland

Lessons-learned sessions and post-mortems are important--but they don’t always happen. Need an effective solution? Hold them repeatedly during the project.

All Good Things...

by Andy Jordan

Ending the project is about more than just post-mortems and parties (don't worry, you can still have those, too!). Here we explore why we want to ensure that the project adds to the overall organizational knowledge--and how formal closure to all of the project elements must leave no confusion, gaps or misinterpretation.

PMO Perspectives

by Michael Wood

As we enter 2011, it's time for a refresher--it's the perfect time to explore the cross section of views and perspectives about PMOs. It's the perfect time to see what others are thinking regarding the state of PMOs, and this article will focus on starting a PMO, avoiding PMO failure, trends and the future of the PMO.

Project Financial Closure Checklist

checklist

Financial closure is the process of completing all project-related financial transactions, finalizing and closing the project financial accounts, disposing of project assets and releasing resources and the work site--all the while maintaining strict accounting practices as mandated by your PMO, company, local, state and federal agencies. Don't worry. We have a checklist to help you through. (Heartburn medications sold separately.)

PMO Perspectives

by Michael Wood

As we enter 2011, it's time for a refresher--it's the perfect time to explore the cross section of views and perspectives about PMOs. It's the perfect time to see what others are thinking regarding the state of PMOs, and this article will focus on starting a PMO, avoiding PMO failure, trends and the future of the PMO.

Stop Conducting Project Post-Mortems

by Andrew Makar, PMP

Should project teams stop conducting post-mortems and wasting time by facilitating lessons-learned workshops? When this writer first heard these words, he thought it would’ve been considered blasphemy. Then he thought about it...

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"Impartial observers from other planets would consider ours an utterly bizarre enclave if it were populated by birds, defined as flying animals, that nevertheless rarely or never actually flew. They would also be perplexed if they encountered in our seas, lakes, rivers and ponds, creatures defined as swimmers that never did any swimming. But they would be even more surprised to encounter a species defined as a thinking animal if, in fact, the creature very rarely indulged in actual thinking."

- Steve Allen

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