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Project Task Duration Estimation and Scheduling

by Jon Quigley, Kim H. Pries

In this article, we look at the key to schedule success, historical and repeatable tasks, why schedules fail, how to eliminate the target date tango and build a schedule defense that manages the risks.

New Requirements? No, Weak BA!

by Dmitri Khanine

Are you still blaming users for new requirements? Why is this all happening? Is it because of the lack of discipline among requirements holders, who just keep on asking for different things—often late in our projects—throwing a monkey wrench into our schedules and budgets?

Project Management and Business Value Creation

by Diego Escobar

Project managers must ensure that projects are aligned with business strategy and value creation for their company and its shareholders. The author demonstrates the importance of the bridge between the business and project worlds, even when there is not a clear link between their objectives. But one objective always remains the same: to create economic value.

Hitting a Moving Target

by Kenneth Darter, PMP

It’s frustrating to work on projects when the client or the customer keeps moving the target you're trying to hit--whether that be requirements, a date or even the vision for the project. How does a project manager fight this moving target and still deliver on time?

Estimating Resources

by Kenneth Darter, PMP

If you cannot make a plan to have the right people at the right time, then your project will not succeed. But how do you arrive at that plan with the number of resources? And how do you ensure that the number of people is right, and the start and finish dates are correct? It all starts with estimating.

Increasing Scope: A Creepy Proposition?

by Kenneth Darter, PMP

Everyone focuses on preventing scope creep and trying to control the scope, but there are times when it's appropriate to actually increase the scope. Project managers need to be ready to handle that situation as well…are you?

Beware of Assumptions!

by Lee Grinberg

Assumptions are some of the biggest culprits in scope creep, misunderstandings and successful projects being declared failures. This article will provide examples of each--and ways to take the assumptions out of the picture and make your project a success.

Project Scope Management and the Dynamics of Change

by Raghuraman Ramasubbu

Change is inevitable, and the only thing that is certain is change. While we can all agree to this, it is imperative that all project managers understand the impact of scope changes to projects that are in the pipeline or the execution phase.

All About Project Scope

PREMIUM presentation

Simply put, scope is the size of the project. But there’s more to it than that!

Requirements Completeness Evaluation Checklist

PREMIUM checklist
by Joe Wynne

This checklist will assist you in minimizing scope creep, schedule extensions and project failure by evaluating whether the initial requirements are complete. This series of requirements attributes, quality checks, and examples provide a thorough review of what you plan to do.

Change Request Form

deliverable

The change request form should be used to formally initiate a request for change to a project. Types of change requests you can initiate by using this form include changes to scope, timeframes, deliverables, resources, milestones and expenditures.

Project Change Request Form

PREMIUM deliverable
by Michael Wood

Change is bound to happen. Make sure that you handle it correctly by following the proper procedures. This form will help you cover all your bases so change doesn't have to mean big surprises or project disasters.

Change Request

deliverable

This simple change request form will keep you mindful of what the proposed change is and the impact it will have.

Project Change Management Standards

PREMIUM deliverable

How do changes get recorded, analyzed and approved on your project? This document contains guidelines for these procedures and more.

Components of a Statement of Work (SOW)

presentation

The statement of work (SOW) encompasses the goals, scope, deliverables, cost and schedule estimates, stakeholder roles, chain of command and communication guidelines for a project. Learn how to put a quality SOW together by studying its components.

Quality Management Systems Procedures Testing

PREMIUM deliverable

This procedure describes the process of testing software code or products by the test team. It documents the procedure for the entire testing cycle: generating test plans, scheduling tests, conducting tests and reporting test results. This procedure applies to new development, as well as major and minor releases, including customized solutions delivered to customers.

Planning and Defining Scope

presentation

This Powerpoint presentation is a high-level view of the basics of planning and defining scope.

PM Project Change Request Form

deliverable

Use this form to capture the what, how and why of your proposed project change and to get sign-off from the brass.

Early Justification Service Level Agreement Planner

deliverable
by Joe Wynne

This tool is designed to create service level agreement information for a justification or similar document. It is most useful for IT organizations that are too small to have a Project Management Office, but can use better control over linking project service level agreements with business objectives.

Business Scope

PREMIUM deliverable

This document outlines the Business Scope, which is a description of the area of the business to be supported by the application package, including the specific business activities to be supported, the business objects to be managed and the organizations and sites to be supported.

Project Status Report Definition

deliverable

Who's on first? What's on second? Don't know who's on third? When it comes to your project, you need to have this information at your fingertips. Use our definition of a project status report to make sure your team members provide the right information to the project manager.

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"One of the symptoms of an approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one's work is terribly important. "

- Bertrand Russell

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