Integration

Have PMOs Turned the Corner?

by Andy Jordan

A few recent events have left this project manager feeling very positive about PMOs--and that’s something that hasn’t happened in quite some time. While we can't yet proclaim PMOs as saviors of organizations, they are now on the journey to success.

Scope

Project Management and Business Value Creation

by Diego Escobar

Project managers must ensure that projects are aligned with business strategy and value creation for their company and its shareholders. The author demonstrates the importance of the bridge between the business and project worlds, even when there is not a clear link between their objectives. But one objective always remains the same: to create economic value.

All About Project Scope

PREMIUM presentation

Simply put, scope is the size of the project. But there’s more to it than that!

Time

Project Plan Reality Check

PREMIUM presentation

Before you submit your project plan for final approval, you'd better check it over. Learn the steps for cross-checking a project plan.

Cost

Project Levels: So You Think You Know What a Level-4 Project Plan Is?

by Wayne Ragas

Outside of the discipline of cost engineering, the concept of project levels isn’t well documented. That hasn’t stopped the spread of the concept, but without supporting documentation, project managers have been left to make up their own definitions. Let’s question our own creative definitions by exploring some common themes, then look at a best practice to help clear the fog. Finally, we’ll apply what we learn to our own projects and programs.

Topic Teasers Vol. 73: Multi-year/Complex Projects

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP

Question: When projects are a normal length, I’m experienced. But now I’m being asked to head a multi-year project that promises to be very complex. Is it just frying fish in a bigger pan, or are there special procedures to know when the undertaking is massive and international, or even just longer and involving more personnel than normal?
A. Long-term projects are challenging and offer a great sense of accomplishment, but there are some risks and procedural modifications to layer onto your usual processes if you hope to be successful. Thinking ahead is crucial, as any errors or missed estimates are magnified.
B. Large projects are scary at first, but because you have so much time and such a large budget, it is easier to balance small errors and still come out within your original metrics. Just be sure the team is signed to a contract of at least six months past the estimated completion date.
C. Projects that will take more than six months and exceed $1 million dollars need more than one project manager. The escalation metric is simple: each quarter on the corporate calendar and each quarter of a million dollars added to the budget equal one additional project manager.
D. Create a rolling staff plan for this endeavor, as people will get too bored and lose their ability to find creative solutions when a project drags on. Perhaps manning it with team members from a third-party staffing service is the most efficient choice.
Pick your answer then Test Your Knowledge!

Quality

Material Checklist

deliverable
by Rami Kaibni

This material checklist and signoff form can be used for any type of material inspection. It is widely used in construction under the quality control process, but can be adapted for other non-construction areas.

People

Communication Accommodation for Project Managers

May 10, 2016 12:00 PM EDT (UTC-4)
PREMIUM webinar

This presentation will explore the ways that PMs can effectively use language to enhance their projects through the use of accommodating language.

Communications

Project Management and the Learning Organization

by Jon Quigley, Shawn P. Quigley

Most people have heard of the term "learning organization." However, do we know what it has to offer project planning management? Before a proper discussion of how it can be employed throughout the project process groups, we must first discuss the five components that form LO.

Risk

PMI Information Systems & Technology Symposium 2016

30 June 2016 | 9 AM to 5 PM ET | 6 PDUS | Online | Online

Overwhelmed by how technology is transforming project management? Looking to increase your productivity and learn new tech tools but don't know where to begin? No matter what your focus—medical, manufacturing, product design or otherwise—this virtual day of learning will deliver years of enduring value, with exclusive insights on how project managers are using new technologies. Register today!

Procurement

Deviation Log Template

PREMIUM deliverable
by Barun Jha

The project procurement process involves contracting part or whole of work. Such a procurement process is often competitive with a condition to the suppliers and contractors to provide deviations to the functional specifications and contractual conditions. To create homogeneity in collection, comparison and evaluation of these deviations, it is better to have a predefined template to collect and log the deviations being proposed. This template can be used as a general standards template provided with procurement documents.

Lessons from a Successful Nuclear Project

by Bruce Harpham

Nuclear technology and project management have a long standing relationship. The River Corridor Closure Project was a finalist for the PMI Project of the Year award in 2015. As a large-scale project that dealt with significant hazards and large budgets successfully, there is much to learn from this project.

Stakeholder

Topic Teasers Vol. 77: Agile Non-Functional Requirements

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP

Question: We have switched to agile practices and, if I do say so myself, I think we are doing an awesome job. However, even though we are carefully creating backlog lists and writing user stories, more often than not our end product or service still does not meet the expectations of our internal and external customers. Has something been left out of what we were taught?
A. Agile does provide a way to use non-functional requirements in its methodology, but often it is overlooked or not stressed when new teams are preparing their first few projects. Make a point to add them into your new process.
B. The reason agile projects are completed so much faster and provide so much more value is that with the Scrum practice methodology, it is no longer necessary to consider vague things like non-functional requirements. If they aren’t going to function anyway, why bother with them.
C. User stories are only written if there is a need for outside personas to be created to represent users. Non-functional requirements are the ones assigned to those personas who would not be interested in your product or service, and therefore can be excluded from consideration.
D. Many projects have both functional and non-functional requirements that impact the outcome of the project. That is why only traditional processes should be used. Agile processes work only on software projects, and then only when there is an absence of non-functional requirements to be considered.
Pick your answer then Test Your Knowledge!

Project Communications: Easily Difficult, Difficultly Easy

by Bruce Garrod

How can something that is fundamentally quite simple be so difficult to understand? How can a skill that is the foundation of project management, and in fact all business, become so difficult so quickly? And why do we often make it so challenging to do something so easy?

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