Inspire Your Multigenerational Team

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Categories: Generational PM


Although the multigenerational team has always existed, project performance can be affected by the project manager's leadership style.
 
The project manager must inspire the members of different generations while recognizing and reconciling generation gaps to develop a healthy environment within the team.

To do so, you must:

1. Win the team members' trust and loyalty
Successful leaders need people around them who share the same mission and vision, and are enthusiastic about it. As a project manager, you must win the trust of the people you are leading.

Your experience as project manager and confidence in your ability to succeed will inspire and make people believe in your capacities as project manager, regardless of what generation they are part of.

2. Do things differently
Think about new and different ways to approach a project or project tasks. Get feedback from your team members and peers to use different approaches, tools and techniques when addressing project tasks. This will motivate your team members to take a more active role in the project.

3. Thank those who help your project to succeed
Project success depends on how well the project team performs. Great leaders know that showing appreciation is a great way to show people they are valued, which everyone appreciates. Say "thank you" and recognize publicly those who helped the project to succeed.

Define and communicate to the project team a recognition system and, from time to time, let them know how much you value their efforts and how much they mean to your organization.

As a project manager, what are you doing to enhance your leadership skills? How do you lead and inspire multigenerational project team members?
 
Read more about acknowledgement.

Posted by Conrado Morlan on: April 16, 2012 10:44 AM | Permalink

Comments

Todd/The Project Management Steps
Thanks for the article.

This is a great reminder about how important it is to be in tune with the multiple generations that exist in all of our workplaces!

Understanding what motivates and inspires our team members from the different generations is critical to achieving a high-performing team. Great advice.

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