"Requirements" for Managing Your Project and Team

From the Voices on Project Management Blog
by , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Voices on Project Management offers insights, tips, advice and personal stories from project managers in different regions and industries. The goal is to get you thinking, and spark a discussion. So, if you read something that you agree with - or even disagree with - leave a comment.

About this Blog

RSS

View Posts By:

Cameron McGaughy
Marian Haus
Lynda Bourne
Lung-Hung Chou
Bernadine Douglas
Kevin Korterud
Conrado Morlan
Peter Tarhanidis
Mario Trentim
Jen Skrabak
David Wakeman
Roberto Toledo
Cecilia Wong
Vivek Prakash
Cyndee Miller
Shobhna Raghupathy

Recent Posts

It All Starts With Strategic Clarity, Say Symposium Speakers

Symposium Experts Offer Tips for Winning the Talent War

Organizational Strategic Alignment in Action

PMO of the Year Award Winner Helps Drive Rapid Growth

Influence Without Authority

Email Notifications off: Turn on


Editor's note: The title of this post was changed on 9 December 2011.

Do you make time to identify your requirements for managing a project? Sure, you plan and manage the project, but as a program or project manager do you also identify your needs for running the project and the team?

It's important to know what we require of our team and stakeholders. When these needs are clearly identified and communicated, it's easier to track and manage the related project tasks and variables.

For example, I recommend that you require your stakeholders to attend meetings and give input during the change management process. You'll need the decision makers to assist you in evaluating the need for change.

When you set and express this participation as a requirement, your stakeholders understand your requirements and their own importance. Further, when a change is requested during the project, it doesn't come as a surprise that you expect stakeholders to be involved in the process.

When it comes to your project team, maybe you require team members to be on time for meetings and to submit progress updates. Communicating this as a need and setting the expectation helps ensure that team members give timely feedback when needed. When team members meet this particular need, you're able to meet your own deadlines with the customer.

Setting and communicating project management requirements are nothing new. For the most part, these needs are automatically expected from everyone involved in the project. But failure to pen down and communicate each need usually leads to more project challenges. For example, team members may start to argue, finger-point or shake off their responsibilities. There's also the possibility of missing a milestone -- and that's something to avoid.

Take time as the project manager to set your requirements for running the project. And do so as a high priority.

What requirements do you establish for managing a project? Do you communicate these to the project team and stakeholders?

Posted by Hajar Hamid on: November 28, 2011 09:38 AM | Permalink

Comments

Janardan Revuur
The topic heading is bit confusing. I mistook the 'Requirements' as technical specifications or the 'need' of the customer.

Anonymous
When a project is on the fast track, it is easy to gloss over defining the requirements once the deliverables have been identified. It is NOT easy to define the requirements once the deliverables start coming.

So, I believe it's very important to take the time to adequately capture and define the requirements. Accurately defining the acceptance criteria for the deliverables is every bit as important as identifying the deliverables themselves.

I maintain that even when the requirements are well defined, they are still at risk. The chief influence on a project is people and people have unique perceptions that tend to "drift." I also maintain the amount of "drift" is directly proportional to the length of time and number of stakeholders involved.

If adequate time isn't dedicated to define the requirements out of the gate, the project is already "adrift." This can lead to gaps in understanding, delays, re-work, cost-overruns, and a very messy close. The requirements gathering stage should always get the high priority that it deserves.

Please Login/Register to leave a comment.

ADVERTISEMENTS

"Life is a great big canvas; throw all the paint you can at it."

- Danny Kaye

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsors

>