Information Mapping

last edited by: Thiago Iglesias on Mar 27, 2015 4:56 PM login/register to edit this page

1 Applications
2 Procedures
3 Instructions
4 Example

A technique used to map information needs to the activity work flow. Information mapping divides and labels information to facilitate comprehension, use, and recall. It was originally developed by Robert E. Horn.[1]


  • To identify information requirements of individual activities or a value stream or process.
  • To provide input for Candidate Entity Analysis, Entity Relationship Modeling, and/or Information Architecture Impact Analysis.
  • To identify measures to enable continuous process improvement.


  1. Review activity work flow diagram and customer needs.
  2. Identify information requirements for each activity on the work flow diagram.
  3. Annotate the diagram.
  4. Summarize the information requirements as part of the activity profile.
  5. Reference associated entity relationship diagrams and apply an appropriate modeling technique.


Review the activity profile (if available), the list of customer needs, list of candidate entity types, and the activity work flow diagram. Identify information required to perform, execute, or otherwise manage each activity. Annotate these requirements on the activity work flow diagram or make a separate list. Compare this list with the candidate entity type listing derived from interviews and/or current data models for consistency and coverage. Update the activity profile with the summarized list. If necessary, identify information requirements to enable activity measurement through continuous process improvement. Apply an appropriate information engineering modeling technique to translate these activity based information requirements into a data model.


information mapping


1. ^ Stanford University: Robert Horn Curriculum Vitae

last edited by: Thiago Iglesias on Mar 27, 2015 4:56 PM login/register to edit this page


"It isn't pollution that is harming the environment, it's the impurities in our air and water that is doing it."

- Dan Quayle