5 Things You Should Tell Your Testers

by Elizabeth Harrin

The testing team forms a small sub-group within your project team. They’ll be looking to you for guidance on what to expect--and how you expect them to go about it. Here are five things to remember to tell your testers before they get started.

How to Improve Application Delivery With Agile

by Bruce Harpham

Many technology project managers focus on building or improving applications. Businesses rely on reliable and high-quality applications to serve customers and maintain operations. If you are in the business of application delivery, read on to see how agile can help.

Preventing the Squeeze

by Andy Jordan

Anyone who has been involved in application development projects is familiar with the testing squeeze--the compression of time available for testing. How do we manage to prevent it?

Testing: The Bug Problem

by Michael Wood

Why are so many bugs and defects getting through to production? Even as the time devoted to testing is expanding, the dynamic nature and complexity of systems is outpacing most IT organizations' ability to keep pace. Here are some tips to help improve your testing results.


Knowledge Shelf

Methodology Weakness in Project Control

by Arild Sigurdsen

Budget overruns are typical for all industries, especially for those dealing with complex, non-repetitive projects. Control over projects is often lost because the most popular project control tools simplify the control issue to the extent that vital steering parameters are lost or missed. A probabilistic forecasting tool like the Range Forecasting Method (RFM) can help address uncertainty and reduce extra costs.

Effective Functional and Cross-Functional Requirements in Agile Projects

by Dina Laresch, PMP

To produce effective functional and cross-functional requirements, project teams must focus on solving real user issues. The author’s team initially ran into problems with delivering software that did not completely resolve market and user needs. To improve their practice, they increased their cross-functional team collaboration and enhanced the requirements management process in their agile projects.

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from No Run Away posted by PARAG KANDEKAR on

This headline looks familiar. Yes it is. We all know the MANTRA / Guideline "Stay Hungry Stay Foolish" for Innovation and Entrepreneurship. Its well-known truth is with Innovation, it nee ...

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featured webinar

The "Other" Tech Tools for PM

PREMIUM on-demand webinar
by Beth Spriggs

You already know and use project management software, and have your favorite. You’ve even expanded into some specialty software for tracking risk management or portfolio management. You have software for tracking your budget, resources, and doing complex Gantt charts. Those are all really good and helpful. But what about all the other tech tools out there?

Voices on Project Management

The Critical Path

Spotlight On: Communication

Elevator Pitch for Project Management (Part 1)

by Alain Soulie

Looking for high-impact statements when you only have 30 seconds to demonstrate the value of project management--and present yourself in the best possible light? What would your elevator pitch be? It's harder than you think...

Spotlight On: Agile

Measuring Organizational Agility: The Triple T Metric

by Braden Kelley

There is an increasing amount of chatter and confusion out there around what organizational agility is--and a feeling that it must be important to organizational success. Maybe you should consider using the Triple T Metric.

Topic Teasers

Topic Teasers Vol. 67: 10,000 Kid Hours

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP

Question: I read in Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell that to be really successful at something, you probably have to have about 10,000 hours invested in it--and that most people start as kids. I’d like my kids to be in the project field, but I don’t really know how someone can get that many hours experience in project management or agile practices.
A. Start with your kids at a very early age and blend the logic and selection process of project management into their day-to-day life. If you are creative, it shouldn’t take much time but rather just an awareness of what you are doing.
B. Ask your local Boy Scout and Girl Scout chapters if they can offer a series of 10 project management badges. If each one takes about two weeks’ worth of work, that’s 100 hours right there.
C. Plan to send your child to summer camp for project management when other kids go off for outdoor living, theater experiences or coding instruction. Children should have made a career decision by 7 or 8 so that they can get the most background possible.
D. Children have so little time to just be kids. Don’t make any attempt to teach them anything at home; they get plenty of education and homework at school. Once they arrive home, just let them relax.
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