Project HEADWAY as the ultimate PM training tool

Project HEADWAY as the ultimate PM training tool

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To get HEADWAY for your whole team, please contact: membership@ProjectManagement.com

How do you learn best?
 
Most people learn best when they spend some time up front with a book or a class, gaining “domain knowledge” that they can apply later. Without some baseline understanding of what we need to do, most of us are lost. The PMBOK® Guide and basic project management training play that role in our careers.
 
A second critical juncture comes when you try to apply that knowledge in the real world. Practical experience and professional “wisdom” come from “doing” and “teaching.” This is where you gain an understanding of how the domain knowledge relates to your personal management style and what you need to do.
 
 
Real Guidance – exactly when you need it.
One of the most common issues project managers face is “when to do what.” As a process, Project HEADWAY not only answers that question, but tells you “how to do it.” So you don’t have to remember everything all of the time. You can focus on the tasks that are right in front of you, going as deep as you need to as your job requires. This is on the job learning at its best.
 
 
Going deeper still
Project HEADWAY is not simply a one-way process, delivered via the web, it leverages the power and reach of the largest dedicated community of IT project managers in the world – gantthead.com.
 
We’ve worked with a leading researcher in online learning, Dr. Greg Walker, to create an approach that we call interrogative learning. Many say, “Finding answers isn’t nearly as important as asking the right questions.” As Dr. Walker notes in his paper, Critical Thinking in Asynchronous Discussions, "most online discussions are just brain dumps of what people know about subject X." They really don’t promote critical thinking about a topic. They sometimes provide quick answers, but don’t go deep enough to deliver real learning.
 
Our interrogative learning approach is implemented on two levels. The first is a guided discussion with a subject matter expert. The second is a set of questions that peers (project participants) can ask of one another to drill deep down into a task. This helps every get down to “why” an action is being taken, making everyone more effective and helping them learn the finer points of management.
 
Project managers hate being looked upon as administrators – simply running schedules and checking off tasks. Their jobs are less satisfying and they are less valuable to you working that way. Interrogative learning can help them evolve into the effective managers everyone wants them to be.



"PMI" and "PMBOK" are registered trademarks of the Project Management Institute, Inc.
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I have made good judgements in the past. I have made good judgements in the future.

- Dan Quayle

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