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Beware of Assumptions!

by Lee Grinberg

Assumptions are some of the biggest culprits in scope creep, misunderstandings and successful projects being declared failures. This article will provide examples of each--and ways to take the assumptions out of the picture and make your project a success.

Internal Blog: Knowledge and Communication in One Package

by Mike Donoghue

An internal blog can be brief, searchable and accessed when people are not available. The ability to exchange with those who are in other departments and get voluntary assistance makes it a valuable tool that improves productivity. But is it appropriate for you and your associates?

A Command Performance

by Kevin Coleman

With the increased oversight on programs and projects of strategic importance, program and project managers find themselves being invited for command performances before the boards of directors. This article provides some advice for when you find yourself in this position.

The Importance of Listening

by Syed Moiz

By not listening, you are putting your company’s reputation, customer satisfaction, the project’s purpose and the cost of completing the project at risk. Here we highlight the importance of listening and why PMs must develop this skill.

The Power of Project Managers Through Positive Intelligence

by Anu Gupta

How does a project manager increase the results of their project without touching the triple constraints (budget, schedule, and scope)? Studies indicate that a leader with a high positive intelligence quotient (PQ) can drive an increase in the performance of the team by 30 percent. Learn how to achieve the PQ lift by practicing intentional activities.

Micromanagement: A Trip to Failure

by Rami Kaibni

People often get confused about what micromanagement really is and how they can conclude whether they (or others) are guilty of it. No one likes to be micromanaged, so let’s take a look at some symptoms and solutions…

Improving Productivity on Projects

by Rami Kaibni

Maintaining a productive team and ending up with productive results can be complicated. Here are some of the means and methods to help you maintain productivity throughout the project lifecycle.

Impacting Your Teams

by Kenneth Darter, PMP

Projects would not happen without teams of people working on them. Project managers have the opportunity to go beyond managing projects and create positive impacts for those people. Are you going the extra mile?

Keeping Competition Healthy

by Andy Jordan

Not everyone can be assigned to the exciting, high-profile projects--and that can cause some frustration and animosity. How do organizations ensure project team competitiveness remains healthy?

Development Saved is Development Earned

by Tony Weaver

When people think of development, they normally think about learning new skills, building relationships, working on stretch assignments and other tasks. But equally as important to our development are “penny saved” techniques--those little things we do that undermine our own development. Conquer these behaviors and you will save your developmental penny...

Be the Change

by Kenneth Darter, PMP

If you look carefully, you will see things that are wrong all around you--from the office to the city to the world. But what can a project manager do to enact change and make things better? Here’s a hint: start small.

Topic Teasers Vol. 68: Living Through Overload

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP

Question: I’m not really a complainer, but I think I’ve reached that tipping point of overload where I can’t make it through no matter how hard I work or how many hours I spend. How do I get through this situation without looking like I can’t handle the projects assigned to me?
A. If you complain, even though you have every right to do so, management will consider you a person who cannot step up to a challenging environment and your chances for promotions will be diminished. Don’t say a word.
B. We all have a point where it becomes impossible to do all the work that needs to be done. Admit defeat to yourself, then find a way to offload some logical things and plan how you will keep from getting here again.
C. Ask your team to each take on 90 more minutes of work per day. While they may put in some unpaid overtime, the feeling of satisfaction in doing something extra toward the success of the project can actually have a positive impact on your future work together.
D. Prepare statistics to show your boss that you need to add one or two new people to the team if you are to meet the deadlines he or she has set. There comes a point where an understaffed team must reach out for new blood to be successful.
Pick your answer then Test Your Knowledge!

Elevator Pitch for Project Management (Part 2)

by Alain Soulie

Looking for high-impact statements when you only have 30 seconds to demonstrate the value of project management--and present yourself in the best possible light? What would your elevator pitch be? In our concluding installment, we look at examples of a project manager’s value pitch.

5 Symptoms of a Sick Project

by Rob Saxon

There are few diagnostic readings that a project manager can take to determine if their project is out of control. Think of them as temperature and blood pressure. By identifying a critical mass of these readings, project managers can sooner identify problems--and change project behaviors for the better.

Elevator Pitch for Project Management (Part 1)

by Alain Soulie

Looking for high-impact statements when you only have 30 seconds to demonstrate the value of project management--and present yourself in the best possible light? What would your elevator pitch be? It's harder than you think...

Social Media: Where to Next?

by Michael Wood

What might the future look like, you ask? Here are some things to ponder as those wishing to command a greater percentage of our consumer spend are finding ways to “customize our experience" through exploiting the opportunities social media, big data analytics and mobility promise once properly integrated.

Translating Human Resources Management into Success

by Jose Parlade

One of the most important traits that a project manager working in the translation industry can have is a skill in dealing with people--the translation industry is at its core highly personal and highly human. This is one reason why a translation project manager should have a good grasp particularly on planning for, obtaining, developing and managing human resources.

Improving Project Success Through Organizational Change

Cesar A. Portillo, DBA, MSIT, PMP, ASQ-CMQ/OE, ASQ-SSGB

Too often, well-intentioned managers begin project initiatives without thoroughly evaluating the organizational changes required to help ensure the initiatives are truly successful. Neglecting to include and properly communicate with employees can lead to resistance and project failure. The author shares two examples from his practice to illustrate how and what to communicate effectively to increase project support.

Making Project Management Work Better

Jeff B. Garrison, PMP

Even the most experienced project managers can benefit from a refresher before initiating the project. If you do not have a line item that says “Project Management Training,” you may have missed the boat and may miss the goals of the project. Every project needs training at some level. Learn how to get your team thinking like project managers.

Team Health: The Pulse of Team Management (Part 5)--Auscultation

by Dr. Deepa Bhide, PMP

Drawing a parallel between clinical medicine and project management, the first part of this series introduced the concept of team health and the applicability of physical exam techniques to team management. As our series concludes, we explore the last of four techniques: auscultation.

Keeping the Band Together

by Kenneth Darter, PMP

You have a great team, but how can you keep them together? Interpersonal relationships and dynamics will tear things apart even while the leader strives to keep the band together for one more hit record.

Team Health: The Pulse of Team Management (Part 4)--Percussion

by Dr. Deepa Bhide, PMP

Drawing a parallel between clinical medicine and project management, the first part of this series introduced the concept of team health and the applicability of physical exam techniques to team management. As our series continues, we explore the third of four techniques: percussion.

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"The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not Eureka! (I found it!) but rather, 'hmm.... that's funny...'"

- Isaac Asimov