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Topic Teasers Vol. 70: Compliance Challenges

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP

Question: We need to make some alterations in the way we manage our internal software and the access employees have to protected data. Now an audit shows we need to make specific changes immediately or pay a huge fine. Is there any way to avoid this embarrassment in the future and protect our public image?
A. International and federal regulations must be complied with, and knowing which regulations apply to your type of business so you can merge compliance into your plans at the project level will help satisfy the mandatory requirements to avoid large fines in the future.
B. Most staff members are reluctant to move forward with required changes to their daily routine, whether technological or manual. To get their cooperation and meet the audit list, fire the first three people who speak out in opposition. Setting an example clearly conveys that this change will occur with or without the agreement of the employees.
C. If your organization has been running smoothly and profitably, ask the legal team to search the past rulings to find ways to avoid altering the violation items listed by the compliance inspectors.
D. Each type of business has a single federal mandate to govern how they manage their profits. Know that the depreciation versus capitalization of corporate expenses should be recorded and tracked to meet audit specifications.
Pick your answer then Test Your Knowledge!

Slashing Risks with User Experience Engineering (Part 4)

by Dmitri Khanine

This is the fourth and final installment in this series on using the latest UX methods for focusing on the right problems and slashing requirements-based risks. In this installment, we will be validating designs, using our prototypes for conducting usability tests.

Slashing Risks with User Experience Engineering (Part 3)

by Dmitri Khanine

What is UX, and why should you pay attention? In the first article, we looked at the seven key UX activities involved in collecting accurate insights, modelling and validating our designs. Part 2 focused exclusively on the key differences of modern user research methods from traditional requirements-gathering activities. Now we look at building prototypes that will make it easy for us to later validate our solutions with usability testing.

Slashing Risks with User Experience Engineering (Part 2)

by Dmitri Khanine

In Part 1, we introduced the idea of User Experience Engineering (UX) and the core tools and processes we use today to conduct user research. Here we continue by showing the core principle that all user research is based on--and how you can use it to combat scope creep and other requirements-based risks right now.

Divide and Direct

by Ronald B. Smith

Dividing your project into smaller parts that are more controllable helps you move closer to your ultimate goal: successfully achieving your project deliverables and high user satisfaction. Follow these seven tips to gain more direct control over your project.

Slashing Risks with User Experience Engineering

by Dmitri Khanine

What is UX, and why should you pay attention? This article will help you steer clear of common pitfalls. You'll understand the key UX activities, their goals, deliverables and what kind of outcomes you should be expecting to receive. We will also look at the degree at which each of these activities are affecting your risk breakdown structure and your schedule, their typical durations and typical manpower requirements.

The Risk-based Testing Strategy

by Patti Gilchrist, PMP

What can you do when schedules slip and there is pressure to still deliver on time? Risk-based testing starts early in the project. You should begin identifying risks to quality early--and use that awareness to guide your testing strategy.

5 Symptoms of a Sick Project

by Rob Saxon

There are few diagnostic readings that a project manager can take to determine if their project is out of control. Think of them as temperature and blood pressure. By identifying a critical mass of these readings, project managers can sooner identify problems--and change project behaviors for the better.

Testing Issues and Opportunities

by Kevin Coleman

Testing has been seen as an unavoidable evil. But as we change and adapt, we must test all of those changes to help ensure they work properly, work as designed, meet the organization’s needs and are secure.

Handling Illness: A Project Manager's Way

by Debasis Chakrabarti

A manager was suffering through a “project” in crisis--but it was not a project that he was managing at his office. The project is crisis was himself. Despite having three decades of project experience, he didn't have a risk response plan at the ready. That's when his project manager brain got to work...

Dynamic Project Management

by Pradeep Sangal

Large infrastructure project teams continuously struggle to manage several issues posed by the volatile environment of projects. It's time to develop a holistic and dynamic project planning and monitoring tool for the effective management of ever-changing project requirements and environments.

Applying Risk-Driven Project Management to Achieve Success in Complex, Innovative Projects

by Dr. Jeno Szep, PMP, CISA, CRISC, CISM, ITIL-F, Dr. Erzsebet Lugosi, PMP, CISA, CRISC, ITIL-F

In today’s rapidly changing corporate environment, innovative projects often must be completed in a very short time frame. After a thorough analysis of different methods and tools, the authors developed the Risk-Driven project management method (RiD) to facilitate the creation of complex enterprise value. Applying the 12-point maturity-value-success metric (12-point MVS metric) can help ensure proactive risk monitoring.

An Iterative Risk Management-Based Strategy for Benefits Realization

by Irfan Shariff

Project managers can facilitate benefits realization and--more strategically--the project management function. That encompasses the three Ps of project management, which can play the crucial but often missing organizational role that will embed benefits realization in strategy execution and--by extension--program and project delivery.

Managing ‘Other Duties as Assigned’

by Andy Jordan

We have all faced challenges--project work needs to be done, but it doesn’t really fit into anybody’s area of accountability. What are the unique challenges of that work, and how do project managers manage it effectively?

Cloak and Dagger Time for PMs

by Kevin Coleman

The sensitive information that is a routine part of project management is now a high-value target of corporate spies. Who said project management was boring?

Escalating Issues

by Kenneth Darter, PMP

There will come a day when you will face an issue and not be able to resolve it on your own. What will you do to ensure the project is not compromised?

A Project Lifecycle for New Hotels

by Richard Whitfield
Gert Noordzy

Addressing the problems inherent in opening new hotels, this paper advocates that hotel owners adopt a complete and well-defined project lifecycle overseen by an experienced project manager. The goals and deliverables for the key phases within this extended new hotel project lifecycle are identified and the main benefits of following this approach are explained. The proposed approach helps optimize the return on investment for each new hotel and maximizes positive cash flows from operations.

Introducing Statistical PERT

by William Davis

Isn’t there a no-cost way to create accurate, probabilistic estimates using just Microsoft Excel--without buying any add-in programs, without installing new software and without having to return to college to take a statistics class? Yes, there is: It’s called Statistical PERT.

Effective IT Leadership: What is the CIO's Role?

by Sreekumar Menon

CIOs holds the key in establishing IT as a part of the strategic business plan, which can help drive initiated changes across the organization. However, CIOs must also focus on maximizing outcomes with results in order to dramatically change the perception and actual value of IT in the eyes of the business.

Impossible Filmmaking (Part 2)

by Kevin Richardson

Nothing in his impressive experience could have prepared a time-crunched filmmaker for his hectic project in China...except one thing: earning his PMP certification. Read how this international project management consultant got an animated film off the ground in no time flat.

New Problems, Old Project

by Kenneth Darter, PMP

It never fails--at the end of the project, a whole lot of problems start cropping up. Tracking these problems in the flurry of activities occurring at the end of a project can be difficult. How can you handle these appropriately?

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