≡ Sections

Justifying

You Wanna Be Starting Something?

by Mike Donoghue

Determining the nature and scope of a project is essential to refining how the resulting effort will accomplish business needs. A crucial component of this is having the knowledge of the business environment and the demands it must meet.

Standard Business Case

PREMIUM deliverable

Document a business case to persuade upper management to fund your project. Keep it short and succinct enough that the busy executive management audience will read and digest it. It should directly convey the information they need to know with salient, hard-hitting, supporting evidence that addresses the bottom line. This is a basic instructional framework of the information you should include in your business case. Enhance it as you wish!

Initiating

Opening Day PM: How to Start on a New Project

by Mike Donoghue

Starting a project is difficult. It's important as a PM to establish who you are as a person in the beginning, particularly with respect to how you will treat the project work and the individuals who will be involved in the process.

Standard Business Case

PREMIUM deliverable

Document a business case to persuade upper management to fund your project. Keep it short and succinct enough that the busy executive management audience will read and digest it. It should directly convey the information they need to know with salient, hard-hitting, supporting evidence that addresses the bottom line. This is a basic instructional framework of the information you should include in your business case. Enhance it as you wish!

Planning

Outlining Resource Needs

by Kenneth Darter, PMP

One of the first questions when starting a new project is: What resources do you need? Outlining these needs to executive management is paramount in securing project success, so keep these four tips in mind.

Standard Business Case

PREMIUM deliverable

Document a business case to persuade upper management to fund your project. Keep it short and succinct enough that the busy executive management audience will read and digest it. It should directly convey the information they need to know with salient, hard-hitting, supporting evidence that addresses the bottom line. This is a basic instructional framework of the information you should include in your business case. Enhance it as you wish!

Executing

External Pressures

by Andy Jordan

Some of the most frustrated project managers work in environments where they are exposed to an organization’s external customers. External PMs have to deal with very varied project execution environments, so how do they still ensure success?

Getting Stuck in the Middle

by Kenneth Darter, PMP

Many projects get stuck in the middle: the execution phase. Project managers need to be ready to fight that problem to help your project succeed all the way to the end. Keep these four recommendations in mind.

Monitoring and Controlling

The Case for the Chief Project Officer

by Andy Jordan

Projects are becoming more strategic, why isn’t project leadership? The argument for the CPO is becoming stronger and stronger, so let's consider the case for an executive responsible for project execution.

Standard Business Case

PREMIUM deliverable

Document a business case to persuade upper management to fund your project. Keep it short and succinct enough that the busy executive management audience will read and digest it. It should directly convey the information they need to know with salient, hard-hitting, supporting evidence that addresses the bottom line. This is a basic instructional framework of the information you should include in your business case. Enhance it as you wish!

Closing

Finding the Time to Collect Lessons Learned

by Kenneth Darter, PMP

Lessons learned can be a valuable resource to future projects. Collecting them should be a priority for the project team even when they cannot see the immediate benefit of it. Keep these four tips in mind to help the process run smoothly.

Standard Business Case

PREMIUM deliverable

Document a business case to persuade upper management to fund your project. Keep it short and succinct enough that the busy executive management audience will read and digest it. It should directly convey the information they need to know with salient, hard-hitting, supporting evidence that addresses the bottom line. This is a basic instructional framework of the information you should include in your business case. Enhance it as you wish!

ADVERTISEMENTS

"To generalize is to be an idiot."

- William Blake