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Creating a Communications Plan: People, Process & Technology

by Erin Coshall, Bogdan Neughebauer

How do you break through white noise? How do you communicate to your audience that what you need them to do is important? What it boils down to is a thoughtful communication plan that includes a focus on people, process and technology.

The START Feedback Framework for Managers

by Gurpreet Singh

Feedback is an essential tool for project and functional managers to achieve a desired outcome or state. When done correctly, results can be achieved quickly. This article elaborates on a feedback framework that can guide the delivery of the feedback to maximize its benefits.

Your Communication Strategy: The Key to Motivating People

by Miguel Jimenez

We need people to feel important, involved and included in every phase of the project from the beginning. The way to keep them motivated is to have an effective communication management strategy.

Being Friendly vs. Being a Friend

by Mike Donoghue

While it is possible (and necessary) to be a friendly project manager to your team, being a friend isn't the best idea. But an organization that has good camaraderie within the body of its workforce can increase employee satisfaction. How do we strike a balance? Here we look at building a friendly work environment.

The Top 10 Reasons Projects Fail (Part 2) (Japanese Translation)

by Marc Lacroix

私たちは皆、一般にビジネス界の落とし穴を知っていて、避けなければならないことを理解していますが、最も明らかなトラップは、時には私たちが陥りやすいものです。特に、数多くの競合する優先事項を持つプロジェクトを管理し、 先行する道を離れてください。 この2部構成の記事シリーズは、プロジェクトが失敗する上位10の理由を特定し、共通のプロジェクト管理の落とし穴を回避する方法に焦点を当てています。

Topic Teasers Vol. 97: Missing Important Questions?

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP, PMI-PBA

Question: I’m so frustrated! On almost every project, no matter how carefully we prepare, there inevitably arises an issue that we didn’t think about in the beginning. Despite all our planning meetings, people were either afraid to speak up or were not engaged enough to bother. How can I improve my chances of covering all the crucial questions from the beginning?
A. Look at the types of communication preferred by the people on your team and the managers involved. Have a pre-planned checklist to cover the types of things that should be brought out in the conversations for each category of person. If all the germane topics aren’t raised by the group, find a way to make sure they become part of the dialogue in the meeting.
B. It is a fallacy to think that all of the potential issues with any project can be addressed from the beginning. Continue as you have in the past and don’t be so hard on yourself if you overlook a potential risk or hidden trap. That’s why we have project managers—to clean up the surrounding mess when activities don’t go as anticipated.
C. Have you considered a contact consultant? These people sit in on all of your important meetings that are larger than three people, and they slip you notes when you are overlooking the body language of the people assembled. Then you can ask people by name why they appear uncomfortable or disinterested during your time to communicate as a group.
D. Purchase project management software that lists all of the possible questions that can be asked about any undertaking with a traditional or agile structure. By faithfully filling in all of the cells for the type of project you will do, the industry you work in and the methodology you have chosen to follow, you will be assured of having all of the necessary information you need.
Pick your answer then Test Your Knowledge!

The Lean Project Manager

by Laurent Kummer

Can we apply lean principles to project management itself? Here the author proposes tips and tricks to introduce lean into our practice, avoiding common waste pitfalls and presenting experiments made in the field to improve the personal productivity of the project manager.

Sneak Peek into PMI Global Congress 2015 - North America: Strategic Business Management Skills (Japanese Translation)

by Joanna Newman, Ori Schibi, Muhammad Abu Baker Ilyas, Mohamed Hassan, Paul Williams

PMI®グローバルコングレス2015-北米における戦略的経営管理スキルセッションの中核戦略的ビジネス管理スキルに関するパネルディスカッションに参加し、PMIグローバルコングレスでのこのコンテンツ分野で提示されるいくつかの主要テーマを垣間見ることができます 2015 - 北アメリカ。

Perspective and Perceptions in Lessons Learned

by Andy Jordan

Projects succeed because of the relationships between people and the ability to create an environment where everyone involved is engaged and committed. Lessons learned sessions can be stressful experiences for those involved, but is that a reason to avoid some of the more sensitive aspects?

Lessons Learned for Continuous Personal Development

by Michael Wood

Learning to live each day as a participant in the process—and as an observer of that participation—takes practice. How can you integrate formal personal development into a daily routine?

Motivational Action Plan

deliverable
by Dave Garrett

If you're having trouble with your team, this might be a good time to check in on their motivation and take some positive action. Here's a plan to get everyone back on the right track.

Project HEADWAY Project Issues Log

deliverable
by Interthink

On projects where you have more than a handful of issues, it is helpful to have a log that you can use to easily track and understand the status of an each one. The log keeps issues at a very high-level while the details are left to the project issue identification form. Project Issue logs are often used on medium to larger projects.

Project HEADWAY Project Team Status Report

PREMIUM deliverable
by Interthink

On many projects, each team is required to submit a status report indicating their progress on their portion of the project. The report ensures the key information required by the project manager is captured from each team in a consistent and complete fashion.

Employee Feedback Planner

PREMIUM deliverable

Use this form to prepare and organize more useful feedback for team members and other people involved in your team.

Project HEADWAY Communications Plan

PREMIUM deliverable
by Interthink

This template allows the project manager to fully understand the communication needs of stakeholders on the project. Stakeholders expectations and requirements can be documented ensuring there is a clear understanding of the why, when, how and what of the project’s communications.

5 Tips to Keep Communication Alive in the Age of Agile

by Brandon Evans

As more organizations become agile, clear, real-time communication becomes increasingly important. Here are a few tips to keep in mind to ensure your communication remains effective a new fast-paced environment.

Meeting Management: Lessons for the Project Manager

by Robert Barger, MBA, PMP

As a project manager, you need meetings in order to increase collaboration and resolve obstacles, but you may be taking productive time from the team member’s workday. Recognizing this helps you understand that maximizing your time together is essential. Learn how to make your meetings efficient, purposeful and interesting.

Adapting to Company Culture: Lessons from Singapore

by Haoze Zhang

While working for tech companies in Singapore, this practitioner gained practical experience dealing with out-of-control projects moving in unexpected directions. Here, he shares some strategies developed in the past few years to help people who are starting a project management career in a similar company culture.

Horizontal and Vertical Communication in Project Management

by Luca Rezzani

In a project, there are two types of communications that take place between the project manager and stakeholders: horizontal and vertical. Knowing the dynamics and characteristics of these can be an important asset of a project manager for achieving project success.

Insights for Managing Global IT Projects Virtually

by Charmaine Karunaratne, MS, PMP

Providing an introduction to virtual project management and its benefits to the audience, the author offers strategies and tactics to work in a virtual setting and addresses the challenges, application and appropriate technology. This paradigm shift can allow businesses to evolve and succeed by gaining a competitive edge.

Raise Your Fist in the Air

by Bart Gerardi

The Agile voting mechanism known as "Fist of Five" is a great way to drive your team towards consensus and commitment. It's a simple, powerful process that can strengthen alignment and increase transparency on your projects. Here’s a look at how — and why — it works.

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"Love your enemies just in case your friends turn out to be a bunch of bastards."

- R.A. Dickson