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Being a ScrumMaster and Project Manager in an Agile World

by Sally Wycislak Bommen

It took this practitioner a while to find her footing as both a project manager and ScrumMaster. Here, she shares lessons learned in a large, corporate environment in which agile is considered "new."

Scrum vs. PMP® in IT Projects: A Possible Compromise?

by Emanuele Boschi

Today, roles have changed. As a project manager, you must keep your projects (and developers) on the right track. It doesn’t matter how many languages or platforms you know. This seasoned practitioner explores two different approaches and applies them to a complex IT scenario, looking at the best of both worlds.

From Scrum Master to Manager: A Dangerous Metamorphosis

by Nima Bahrehdar

Many organizations are obsessed with getting things done quickly no matter what. Therefore, they create reward plans that motivate this behavior. ScrumMasters gradually deprioritize promoting Scrum values and metamorphose into agile project managers. How can we prevent this?

Agility and Values-Based Leadership (Part 4): Commitment

by Andrew Burns

This fourth installment of articles scrutinizing agile frameworks based on values, principles and practices focuses on commitment (following the entries on courage, focus and openness). A stated value of the Scrum framework, commitment is everything in agile.

Agility and Values-Based Leadership (Part 3): Openness

by Andrew Burns

All agile frameworks may be examined in terms of core values. This third entry in a five-part series continues to explore agile frameworks from the vantage point of values, principles and practices. Agile’s Scrum framework in particular espouses five values: courage, focus, openness, respect and commitment. This offering looks at the value of openness to bring principles and practices into better relief.

Agility and Values-Based Leadership (Part 2): Focus

by Andrew Burns

This is the second in a five-part series of articles regarding agile frameworks based on values, principles and practices. Scrum espouses five values: courage, openness, respect, commitment and focus. In this series, each article will explore one of these values--on which a deeper discussion of principles and practices assembles.

Project Managers Still Don't 'Get' Agile

by Anthony Mersino, PMP, PMI-ACP, CSM, CSP, PSPO

If you are a traditional project manager practicing agile methods, chances are you don’t really “get” it. Nothing has been worse for the understanding and proper application of agile approaches in organizations today than the flawed thinking and actions of well-meaning middle managers and project managers.

What It Takes to Manage Hybrid Projects

by John Reiling

These days, it takes more than project management skills to succeed. It takes a person with agility—flexibility in understanding and applying the ins and outs of any method. Let’s investigate what "hybrid PM" is all about!

The Morphing Project Manager

by Laura Burford

Hybrid project manager roles might be the way of the future. Do you need to revisit your skills? This article provides guidelines to assist you with becoming a hybrid PM, and starts by defining their characteristics.

The Hybrid PM: Time to Learn a New Language

by Andy Jordan

As more and more projects blend waterfall and agile elements, the role of the project manager—and to some degree the ScrumMaster—changes, but in what ways?

開発プロジェクトの計画と管理:ハイブリッド方式

by Michael Wood

ハイブリッド・プロジェクトマネジメントに話が及ぶと、アプリケーション開発における伝統 的なウォーターフォール型と、アジャイルやスクラム開発フレームワークの融合についての賛 否に終始することがほとんどである。ソフトウェア・アプリケーションを開発するための唯一 の正しいアプローチが存在し、その他のアプローチは失敗するものと信じる人々がいるため、確かに本稿は繊細なトピックである。

Planning and Managing Development Projects: The Hybrid Way

by Michael Wood

The risk we take in swearing allegiance to a specific approach is that following the approach often becomes more important than achieving the goal of the project. Let’s explore the merits of using the best of different approaches—and how marrying them into a hybrid model impacts the way projects are planned and managed.

Topic Teasers Vol. 77: Agile Non-Functional Requirements

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP, PMI-PBA

Question: We have switched to agile practices and, if I do say so myself, I think we are doing an awesome job. However, even though we are carefully creating backlog lists and writing user stories, more often than not our end product or service still does not meet the expectations of our internal and external customers. Has something been left out of what we were taught?
A. Agile does provide a way to use non-functional requirements in its methodology, but often it is overlooked or not stressed when new teams are preparing their first few projects. Make a point to add them into your new process.
B. The reason agile projects are completed so much faster and provide so much more value is that with the Scrum practice methodology, it is no longer necessary to consider vague things like non-functional requirements. If they aren’t going to function anyway, why bother with them.
C. User stories are only written if there is a need for outside personas to be created to represent users. Non-functional requirements are the ones assigned to those personas who would not be interested in your product or service, and therefore can be excluded from consideration.
D. Many projects have both functional and non-functional requirements that impact the outcome of the project. That is why only traditional processes should be used. Agile processes work only on software projects, and then only when there is an absence of non-functional requirements to be considered.
Pick your answer then Test Your Knowledge!

Agile Iterations: Why Bother?

by Gil Broza

Teams run into trouble when they adopt agile practices without really knowing why they are doing them. This can happen when people who’ve been told to use iterations (sprints) still don’t understand why. And when they act on these statements, they unknowingly undermine their efforts to use agile. What can we do?

Handling Interruptions in Scrum: 4 Options (Part 2)

by Gene Gendel

In an ideal world, a cross-functional Scrum team must be fully focused on Scrum. The team is also expected to hear a voice of one customer only: the product owner. But what happens when reality intervenes and you get pulled in other directions? As our two-part series concludes, we look at the remaining two ways of interrupting Scrum sprints--and share what can be done about them.

Handling Interruptions in Scrum: 4 Options (Part 1)

by Gene Gendel

In an ideal world, a cross-functional Scrum team must be fully focused on Scrum. The team is also expected to hear a voice of one customer only: the product owner. But what happens when reality intervenes and you get pulled in other directions?

Agile Innovation

by Mike Griffiths

There are great opportunities for growth and deviation outside the standard agile models for stable teams who want to evolve further. This article tells the story of one team that did just that--and what other people can learn from it.

The Agile Certification Landscape

by Kevin Aguanno, CSPM (IPMA-B), Cert.APM, PMP, PMI-ACP, CSM, CSP, FPMAC, FAPM

The number of agile certifications available in the market keeps growing, and one must consider the unique needs of the inquiring company or individual to know what would be best for them. What factors should you consider? Do you even know the options available?

User Stories: Ready, Set, Go!

by Bob Galen

Have you ever entered a sprint taking on a user story that you later regretted? What can be done to prevent this frustration? Is there a technique that will prevent this from happening, or are these teams doomed to keep repeating their mistakes?

Is Your Daily Standup Meeting Hurting Teamwork?

by Gil Broza

In its popular, standard form, the Daily Scrum (“the Standup”) hurts teamwork. Follow this PM to understand how and why the meeting causes that--and discover alternatives that work better.

Topic Teasers Vol. 52: Calculating Agile Capacity

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP, PMI-PBA

Question: After a recent conversion by my team regarding agile, we find that there is a mismatch between the number of hours we should have for working on stories and the amount of time we really have. So we are constantly over-committing to our Product Owner and not delivering. Where are we going wrong?
A. Traditional teams may have a 15-20% contingency cushion in time and cost on their project estimates. Routinely subtract a similar agile contingency from the number of backlog items you accept to make sure you finish all planned work within a single iteration.
B. Agile is expected to be flexible, and velocity can vary. Just complete what you can and adjust your velocity for the next sprint if you don’t finish all of the stories you committed to complete this time.
C. Be sure you are acknowledging hours that team members will spend in Scrum ceremonies, personal time commitments and non-team directed organizational work before calculating the capacity for this iteration.
D. Ask the ScrumMaster to speak to anyone on the team who did not finish his or her work during the previous iteration. This person is making the team look bad and should be disciplined if it happens again.
Pick your answer then Test Your Knowledge!

An Insight on the Key Inspect and Adapt Cycle: The Retrospectives

by Madhavi Ledalla, PMP

A retrospective is a special meeting during which the team gathers after completing an increment of work to inspect and adapt their methods and teamwork. Retrospectives enable whole-team learning, act as catalysts for change and generate action. This article presents some of the reasons why the retrospective’s efficacy can fade over time and then discusses some interesting techniques to keep them lively.

Danger, Will Robinson! 5 Anti-Patterns of Agile Adoption

by Bob Galen

As an experienced agile coach, this writer often gets asked about agile tactics and practices--what works and what doesn’t. There are no singular answers, but there are some generative behaviors and rules for agile done well. In this article, he explores a set of common anti-patterns that he sees in an effort to share what not to do in your agile journey.

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I lie every second of the day. My whole life has been a sham.

- George Costanza