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Did Agility Slip Away?

by Tina Szarenski

What happens when you are not part of an agile development team? If you aren’t exercising your planning rituals and weekly sprints, will you lose muscle memory? Or is there an opportunity to apply what you know to better all aspects of what you do?

The Hybrid Solution

by Ali Forouzesh

Implementing a hybrid methodology can be more effective and useful to your project needs, because traditional approaches can sometimes be too heavy and complex for incremental projects. Here, a practitioner shares his experiences consulting on a project.

Agile: Where the Magic Happens

by Paolo Birsa

Is agile outside of your team's comfort zone? Read how one practitioner successfully applied agile principles in the organization he's managing.

What Exactly is Agile Project Management?

by Jim Hannon

The words “agile project management” are being used in the industry to describe a new approach to how project management is conducted. The industry and company leaders need to fully understand how project managers can be brought into the agile world to ensure cohesion between these two disciplines.

Is the Hybrid Methodology the Future of Project Management?

by David Robins

A more nuanced approach to agile and waterfall has started gaining traction. Once referred to as “structured agile,” more practitioners are combining both methodologies. This article provides a framework for how ScrumMasters and project managers can work together using hybrid principles.

Scope Changes Within the Agile/Scrum Framework

by Karen Z. Sullivan, PMP, PSM 1

The approach to scope changes used within the agile/Scrum framework provides a stable environment so the development team can focus on getting work “done.” Frequent feedback about the product allows for less upfront planning and means the Scrum team can quickly adapt to changes. Delivering business value early and often results in increased customer satisfaction.

Succeed with Scrum: Don't Break These 7 Rules

by Anthony Mersino, PMP, PMI-ACP, CSM, CSP, PSPO

Is your organization undermining the benefits of Scrum without even knowing it? Scrum is a simple agile framework that can be difficult to implement. Here the author looks at the seven most commonly missed or abused rules of Scrum.

Deploy Faster by Getting Rid of End-of-Development Testing

by Paul Carvalho

Testing at the end of a development cycle is a common practice in traditional approaches. Unfortunately, it becomes an obstacle on your path to agility, slowing down your ability to deploy to production faster. Let’s take a look at what goes on in this testing phase, some potential causes and ideas for getting unstuck.

The Agile Scene in a Small-Town Theater

by Roger Kent, PMP, PMI-ACP

Iterative and incremental methods can be used outside software development. Here’s a challenge that arose in one small-town Shakespeare festival--and the “agile” approach used to meet it.

Agility and Values-Based Leadership (Part 5): Respect

by Andrew Burns

Following installments on the other four stated Scrum values (courage, focus, openness and commitment), this concluding entry focuses on respect. It offers techniques to scrutinize agile project management frameworks based on values, principles and practices.

Being a ScrumMaster and Project Manager in an Agile World

by Sally Wycislak Bommen

It took this practitioner a while to find her footing as both a project manager and ScrumMaster. Here, she shares lessons learned in a large, corporate environment in which agile is considered "new."

Scrum vs. PMP® in IT Projects: A Possible Compromise?

by Emanuele Boschi

Today, roles have changed. As a project manager, you must keep your projects (and developers) on the right track. It doesn’t matter how many languages or platforms you know. This seasoned practitioner explores two different approaches and applies them to a complex IT scenario, looking at the best of both worlds.

From Scrum Master to Manager: A Dangerous Metamorphosis

by Nima Bahrehdar

Many organizations are obsessed with getting things done quickly no matter what. Therefore, they create reward plans that motivate this behavior. ScrumMasters gradually deprioritize promoting Scrum values and metamorphose into agile project managers. How can we prevent this?

Agility and Values-Based Leadership (Part 4): Commitment

by Andrew Burns

This fourth installment of articles scrutinizing agile frameworks based on values, principles and practices focuses on commitment (following the entries on courage, focus and openness). A stated value of the Scrum framework, commitment is everything in agile.

Agility and Values-Based Leadership (Part 3): Openness

by Andrew Burns

All agile frameworks may be examined in terms of core values. This third entry in a five-part series continues to explore agile frameworks from the vantage point of values, principles and practices. Agile’s Scrum framework in particular espouses five values: courage, focus, openness, respect and commitment. This offering looks at the value of openness to bring principles and practices into better relief.

Agility and Values-Based Leadership (Part 2): Focus

by Andrew Burns

This is the second in a five-part series of articles regarding agile frameworks based on values, principles and practices. Scrum espouses five values: courage, openness, respect, commitment and focus. In this series, each article will explore one of these values--on which a deeper discussion of principles and practices assembles.

Project Managers Still Don't 'Get' Agile

by Anthony Mersino, PMP, PMI-ACP, CSM, CSP, PSPO

If you are a traditional project manager practicing agile methods, chances are you don’t really “get” it. Nothing has been worse for the understanding and proper application of agile approaches in organizations today than the flawed thinking and actions of well-meaning middle managers and project managers.

What It Takes to Manage Hybrid Projects

by John Reiling

These days, it takes more than project management skills to succeed. It takes a person with agility—flexibility in understanding and applying the ins and outs of any method. Let’s investigate what "hybrid PM" is all about!

The Morphing Project Manager

by Laura Burford

Hybrid project manager roles might be the way of the future. Do you need to revisit your skills? This article provides guidelines to assist you with becoming a hybrid PM, and starts by defining their characteristics.

The Hybrid PM: Time to Learn a New Language

by Andy Jordan

As more and more projects blend waterfall and agile elements, the role of the project manager—and to some degree the ScrumMaster—changes, but in what ways?

開発プロジェクトの計画と管理:ハイブリッド方式

by Michael Wood

ハイブリッド・プロジェクトマネジメントに話が及ぶと、アプリケーション開発における伝統 的なウォーターフォール型と、アジャイルやスクラム開発フレームワークの融合についての賛 否に終始することがほとんどである。ソフトウェア・アプリケーションを開発するための唯一 の正しいアプローチが存在し、その他のアプローチは失敗するものと信じる人々がいるため、確かに本稿は繊細なトピックである。

Planning and Managing Development Projects: The Hybrid Way

by Michael Wood

The risk we take in swearing allegiance to a specific approach is that following the approach often becomes more important than achieving the goal of the project. Let’s explore the merits of using the best of different approaches—and how marrying them into a hybrid model impacts the way projects are planned and managed.

Topic Teasers Vol. 77: Agile Non-Functional Requirements

by Barbee Davis, MA, PHR, PMP, PMI-ACP, PMI-PBA

Question: We have switched to agile practices and, if I do say so myself, I think we are doing an awesome job. However, even though we are carefully creating backlog lists and writing user stories, more often than not our end product or service still does not meet the expectations of our internal and external customers. Has something been left out of what we were taught?
A. Agile does provide a way to use non-functional requirements in its methodology, but often it is overlooked or not stressed when new teams are preparing their first few projects. Make a point to add them into your new process.
B. The reason agile projects are completed so much faster and provide so much more value is that with the Scrum practice methodology, it is no longer necessary to consider vague things like non-functional requirements. If they aren’t going to function anyway, why bother with them.
C. User stories are only written if there is a need for outside personas to be created to represent users. Non-functional requirements are the ones assigned to those personas who would not be interested in your product or service, and therefore can be excluded from consideration.
D. Many projects have both functional and non-functional requirements that impact the outcome of the project. That is why only traditional processes should be used. Agile processes work only on software projects, and then only when there is an absence of non-functional requirements to be considered.
Pick your answer then Test Your Knowledge!

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"All you need in this life is ignorance and confidence, and then success is sure."

- Mark Twain