IT @ the Table

Janis Rizzuto

Janis is an award-winning journalist and editor who has covered many industries beyond project management, including health care, financial services, higher education and retail sales.

The IT department is increasingly visible at the highest corporate levels, affecting how projects are selected, the tools that manage them and perceptions of IT value.

If you can't relate to what's going on in Don Haas' IT shop, you soon will. From the tough budget constraints and increased corporate scrutiny to the tools he's using to manage the project portfolio, Haas' challenges reflect core issues in the world of IT project management. As manager of applications development at Tri-County Metropolitan Transportation District of Oregon (TriMet) in Portland, Haas was faced this year with a capital budget seven times smaller than in 2002 because of the recession. At the same time, the governance structure he was used to is changing. TriMet's Information Technology Committee, in place for the past four years and populated by managers from the agency's major divisions, is giving way to a group run by executives at a more senior level. The new governance group, which starts operating this month, will surely demand even more accountability for IT projects and more strategic benefit from IT expenditures, he says. And through it all, Haas will rely on a comprehensive project and portfolio management system to help him clear the higher bars set for IT.

Why Executives Care

It's no secret that billions were wasted on worthless IT projects in the years before economic reality hit. And …

Please log in or sign up below to read the rest of the article.

ADVERTISEMENT

Continue reading...

Log In
OR
Sign Up
ADVERTISEMENTS

"If they have moving sidewalks in the future, when you get on them, I think you should have to assume sort of a walking shape so as not to frighten the dogs."

- Jack Handey

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsors