The Power of Positive Leadership

Mike Donoghue is a member of a multinational information technology corporation where he collaborates on the communications guidelines and customer relationship strategies affecting the interactions with internal and external clients. He has analyzed, defined, designed and overseen processes for various engagements including product usability and customer satisfaction, best practice enterprise standardization, relationship/branding structures, and distribution effectiveness and direction. He has also established corporate library solutions to provide frameworks for sales, marketing, training, and support divisions.

What is your management technique? Are you a “spare the rod and spoil the child” type of project manager, or do you have other disciplinary methods you utilize to keep your team in line and meet project time frames?

In your role, could you use a gentler and more supportive hand when governing your project team and become a more positive leader? There has been research into the value of positive (as opposed to negative) reinforcement, but when applied to project management tasks, we are also looking to how these principles can be utilized when we oversee team members, negotiate resources, get into frank discussions with stakeholders and plod along to accomplish project goals.

The benefit of positive leadership in project management is that it helps build strong connections between managers and their teams, thereby improving member performance, spurring creative and inventive solutions, and ultimately leading to greater project success.

When confronted with the amount of daily energy required to plan, coordinate, schedule and incorporate the many aspects of a project, a PM’s job is quite challenging—never mind the constant onslaught of emails and text messages, conflicts with deliverables (and the personnel behind them), benchmarks and deadlines (and their associated intricacies), stakeholder and managerial negotiation and disagreement, and crunch…

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