Using Success as a Motivator

Andy Jordan is President of Roffensian Consulting S.A., a Roatan, Honduras-based management consulting firm with a comprehensive project management practice. Andy always appreciates feedback and discussion on the issues raised in his articles and can be reached at andy.jordan@roffensian.com. Andy's new book Risk Management for Project Driven Organizations is now available.

As a project manager, I have felt at times as though the world was out to get me. It seemed as though everything that could go wrong was going wrong and I couldn’t understand why my sponsor, stakeholders and team were all out to sabotage my efforts to deliver a successful project. I’m sure you have had days like those, too.

Of course, that’s not really the case—people don’t come to the office determined to do everything they can to fail in their work, to ensure the project struggles and to let their colleagues down. Everyone wants to come to work and do the best possible job they can, achieving as much success as possible and then going home to enjoy the most important things in life—the friends and family that are the reason we work in the first place.

One of my favorite quotes (and I’ve mentioned it here before) is from Henry Ford: “Whether you think you can or you think you can’t, you’re right.” That mentality can be applied very much to attitudes brought about by success in the workplace. It’s far easier to believe you can overcome the next challenge in front of you if you have successfully overcome a series of challenges previously. That’s what I want to look at in this article—with a specific focus on how we can create high-success environments to act as a springboard for future …

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"Impartial observers from other planets would consider ours an utterly bizarre enclave if it were populated by birds, defined as flying animals, that nevertheless rarely or never actually flew. They would also be perplexed if they encountered in our seas, lakes, rivers and ponds, creatures defined as swimmers that never did any swimming. But they would be even more surprised to encounter a species defined as a thinking animal if, in fact, the creature very rarely indulged in actual thinking."

- Steve Allen

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