Philanthropy: Not Just an Annual Thing

Mike Donoghue is a member of a multinational information technology corporation where he collaborates on the communications guidelines and customer relationship strategies affecting the interactions with internal and external clients. He has analyzed, defined, designed and overseen processes for various engagements including product usability and customer satisfaction, best practice enterprise standardization, relationship/branding structures, and distribution effectiveness and direction. He has also established corporate library solutions to provide frameworks for sales, marketing, training, and support divisions.

While many organizations use the final months of a given year to show gratitude for what they have and support for those in need, a company that practices charitable actions with its employees on a regular basis is one that truly proves its generosity and compassion. Certainly, those corporations that demonstrate their desire to help others at any given time of the year are to be acknowledged and congratulated, but an organization that regularly and continuously displays kindness is one that deserves additional recognition.

Just as many charitable groups are started and steered by key individuals, so are corporate giving campaigns. The creation of a campaign may stem from issues that staff members have experienced and feel a kindred connection, such as a health condition. Having this connection creates a stronger communal drive in individuals to “make things happen” and inspire other employees.

Similarly, office management and executive leaders may be behind the development of a corporate identity that associates their organization with a community spirit and/or an environment that provides support for heartfelt causes.

There are benefits to these practices as well. Your organization may have a philanthropic goal that can help motivate your workforce, but it also may have the added bonus of engaging your customers and potential clients to look more closely …

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I'd rather be a failure at something I love, than a success at something I hate.

- George Burns