How Do You Look Yourself in the Mirror...Hypothetically Speaking?

Miriam Ziemelis
Let's assume that you are in a position at your current company that makes you privy to certain information indicating that your company could be on the verge of going belly up. Okay, you may not be in the same league with Enron, but there are still people's jobs to worry about. What do you do when team members start coming to you, asking if they should be interviewing over their lunch breaks? Is it getting hard to look in the mirror when your first instinct is to tell them to run--not walk--to the nearest exit? What do you do when you are torn between business ethics and moral ethics, and should there be a difference?

Kind of a tough scenario, isn't it? Naturally, there are those of us who insist we would take the high road. "Absolutely!" we shout from the mountain tops. "I would not hesitate to tell every member of the team the situation. They deserve the truth!" I would hardly be one to disagree with that sentiment. After all, these are people that you most likely hired, the people whose lives you share on a daily basis. You were there to see the new baby pictures and to high-five them as they rounded home plate at the last company game. How could you even dream of not telling them that the company may be going under?

But then again, isn't "may" the operative word here? You aren't certain that the company is going down like the Titanic. However, how do you ignore the …

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