Project Management

Influence Without Authority

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Many project professionals find themselves in a position where they need to influence the decisions or actions of others, but lack the authority to impose an outcome. The ability to influence others is particularly important when managing teams in a matrix organization or when working as a consultant or expert advising line management or project management.

A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide)—Fifth Editionincludes influencing in its list of key interpersonal skills and provides a brief outline in Appendix X3.5. Here are some practical options for building and using influence to benefit a project.

One of the standard references defining the problem and offering practical solutions is Influence Without Authorityby U.S. professors Dr. Allan Cohen and Dr. David Bradford. This book introduces the Cohen-Bradford Influence Without Authority (IWA) model that describes how to influence others through a give-and-take exchange. The model consists of six steps, starting with “Assume all are potential allies.” Then it moves upward with:

·        “Clarify your goals and priorities”

·        “Diagnose the world of the other person”

·        “Identify relevant currencies, theirs and yours”

·        “Dealing with relationships”, and

·        Finally at the top, “Influence through give-and-take”

The IWA model is based on creating something of value to “trade” and then obtaining the best return from your investment. It is subtly different to the transactional approach of What’s in it for Me (WIFM).

WIFM focuses on finding a value proposition that provides a direct benefit to the stakeholders you want help from. It is a simple “trade” — if they help you achieve your project outcomes, they benefit from the success. WIFM is effective in situations where a senior stakeholder (e.g., the sponsor) can directly benefit from helping you succeed.

IWA is more effective when there is no direct benefit for the stakeholder you need help from and is based on “trading favors” or, more simply, the “you scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours” approach. We can and often do intuitively understand the give-and-take in a transaction for small things, such as sharing the effort to pick up the morning coffee. However, for large complex transactions, we need to be more methodical and think through our processes, goals and interests, those of our allies and those of the stakeholders we need to influence.

For starters, project managers who use IWA effectively know they get work done by working well within their peer network. If someone does something for the project manager, there’s a good chance the project manager will do something for him or her in return. It’s a two-way trade that benefits everyone. But even so, influencing without authority isn’t an easy task. The key to IWA is creating and banking “organizational currency” in advance of the time you need to use it.

Organizational currency comes in many formats:

·         The ability to highlight and publicize good performance

·         The ability to make useful connections for the person

·         Useful or valuable information (for the stakeholder)

·         Developing a good relationship that both people value

·         Providing help or assistance needed by the other person

·         Personal support, coaching or mentoring 

Keep in mind you need to invest your time and effort to earn organizational currency with your stakeholders before you can “spend” it. Time isn’t a luxury many project managers can afford, but investing in relationship-building will ultimately help you to be more productive and generate quicker consensus with project team members, peers in the organization and senior managers.

The two key takeways for successful IWA? First, recognize that “give” comes before “take” in “give-and-take,” and second, make sure what you give is of value to the people you are engaging within their world. You need to understand what is important or useful to them.

What’s your number-one tip for influencing without authority?

Posted by Lynda Bourne on: November 18, 2014 02:36 AM | Permalink

Comments (1)

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Daniel Goleman introduced 'Emotional Intelligence' and my recent exposure to the study of 'resonant' (as opposed to 'dissonant') leadership (Boyatzis), as well as counselling skills, makes me very receptive to the idea of influence without authority. I was also minded of a book i read decades ago; its author: Trevanyan, entitled 'Shibumi' referring to the Japanese concept of 'authority without domination'.
In turn, the Kilman Model of conflict highlights the need for collaboration or at least compromise in order to secure a 'win-win' way forward.
Each of these facets of achieving influence without authority requires the establishment of common ground: the ability to find resonance with the other. As a Project Manager all too often the need to control and direct runs interference on our ability to open up to the other: to establish a pathway to empathy facilitating an appreciation of the others needs which identifies the golden path to establishing rapport.
My recommendation, therefore, is to be mindful of this process as being every bit as crucial to success as it is a necessary precursor to influence.

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