Communicating the Vision (RPA & OCM)

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This is the second post in a series related to Robotic Process Automation*, begun in association with PMI's Information Systems and Technology Symposium, June 14, 2017, where I presented Becoming an RPA-Ready Project Manager. You can filter posts in this blog to find all related to "Robotic Process Automation".

Another component of organizational change management that you will need to monitor as a project manager is that the vision for the change has been communicated. Generally, you do not have to personally manage vision communication. It is the job of senior leaders to define and sometimes a special group helps to formalize the actual message into emails and intranet web pages. Still. it is wise for you to make sure it is going to be done properly or the tasks you are accountable for will not likely be successful as planned. You just have to love those out-of-project dependencies!

How do you know the vision of organizational change? It is a clear description of the target future state of the organization and the benefits that will be expected. Don't settle for anything less. For organization-wide RPA efforts, where the vision includes software robots doing some of the work previously done by most human resources, the description must include a more satisfactory workplace where workers complete less tedious, more valuable work.

If the vision is not communicated to everyone, your project gets run off the rails by

  • Conflicting interpretations of what the end point is leading to
  • Differing senses of impact by individuals or groups, differing senses of urgency
  • Ability of groups or individuals to promote their own agenda or pressure for certain changes
  • Changes occur, but not exactly what is needed to meet the vision. Interpretations change over time, or other factors.

Don't wait for these symptoms to occur, unless you are a masochist. Treat proper organizational communication as an Assumption, Dependency or something else formal and reportable. My paramour Amelia was wisecracking at lunch the other day that if you publicize a dependency for vision communication, then you might spur "someone" into action to do it!

What about the rollout of that vision? You will know effective, broad communication of the RPA effort vision is occurring when great practices for organization-wide communications are implemented. That includes:

  • Multiple channels used, such as email, dedicated intranet area, town hall sessions
  • Initial communications and ongoing updates
  • Executive participation
  • Q&A sessions with leaders

Make a note to look for these great practices to monitor your Assumption or Dependency. Don't see them? Consider managing as a Risk.

The communication should be continual and take many perspectives, such as

  • The importance of the organization's ability to succeed or avoid failure in marketplace, improve customer satisfaction. This addresses concerns of those who always ask the question "Why are we doing this in the first place? Everything was fine before."
  • The new structure to support better employee satisfaction
  • The new more productive and profitable business processes

Per member Philippe Schuler responding to the first OCM post, success stories are also important in organizational change management communications. In RPA projects, workers (users) will be expected to be skeptical of the changes, but evidence that it has worked well previously will help calm fears. Especially useful stories for RPA will include any that show the workers who have robots working for them are more productive and happy with their now more valuable work - and thus making the vision manifest.

If you start to see a lot of push-back to your RPA projects, it may not be your teams' fault, it could be inadequate organizational readiness for your projects. Consider escalating with that as a potential cause. The solution to that problem should be different than having you just push harder yet again. It could be resolved as a management problem beyond your role. 

 

* Robotic Process Automation:  For our purposes, configuring a software robot, using one of the relatively new tools available, to complete a certain part of a work process formerly completed by FTEs. RPA is not Artificial Intelligence, but simply a way of automating the execution of well-defined business rules. Projects are short and bring quick benefits to the organization.

 

Posted on: July 27, 2017 08:58 PM | Permalink

Comments (7)

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Good stuff Joe, Interesting and great suggestion to include visionary statements clearly communicated under Dependency/Assumptions.

Thanks for another great write-up

Thanks Joe.

Communication is always key for any project I've ever been part of. Failure and success was all based on the communication from beginning to end.

Thanks for sharing

Thanks for sharing

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