Project Management

Project Site Design for Stakeholders (Part 2)

From the Eye on the Workforce Blog
by
Workforce management is a key part of project success, but project managers often find it difficult to get trustworthy information on what really works. From interpersonal interactions to big workforce issues we'll look the latest research and proven techniques to find the most effective solutions for your projects.

About this Blog

RSS

Recent Posts

Leading by Listening (Part 2)

Leading by Listening (Part 1)

Lockdown! Just Like That Everything Changes (Now You Lead)

Project Site Design for Stakeholders (Part 2)

Project Site Design For Stakeholders (Part 1)



In the previous post and an article, Improve Stakeholder Relations by Adding a Social Component, we have been exploring how a web share site for stakeholders is a good way to keep them in communication and involved, but you have to use the correct tactics to make it all work. There were a couple of topics requested from readers that were left to cover: building the site itself and using a push email to make it easier for stakeholders to get involved.

Building the Site

Just how to build such a site depends on the applications and tools you have at your disposal. Some of these are listed at the bottom of this post. If you have an enterprise platform to build a cover page and link to files and a discussion area, that is all you need.  If you are not sure at all how to proceed, try these steps:

  • Find the individual who manages the shared space, or at least controls access.
  • Request permission to build your project site or edit a basic one created for you. Feel free to use a page within an existing site.
  • If you cannot figure out how to place content on the page, identify someone who can coach you or even build the site for you. Plan to spend less than an hour to get your new design functional.

As stated in the article and previous post, the cover page is the most important. The first page can be and probably should be your only developed page in most situations. Why? Because any additional pages will take more time to administer and update over time. If you have a project coordinator or other person who can make updates to the site in a timely fashion, then feel free to build out additional pages within reason.

Beyond your initial page, additional pages might do the following:

  • Describe the project in detail for individuals who are added on later to the project and to whom you do not want to have additional meetings to get them up to speed on basic information. This would need to include impact statements for each stakeholder area.
  • Describe in detail risks and issues for stakeholders. Where risks and issues are complex or need to be highlighted on a special page that can be linked from the main page, a new focused page on any urgent or important risks and issues can be very useful. A focus on risks and issues may not be appropriate for the main page where you want to keep content simple and immediate. If risks and issues are going to take more time to describe that is more space and more wording to describe, then you want to have a focus page with diagrams or other explanatory text targeted to stakeholders. Finally, this page can motivate stakeholders to join related online discussions.

Combining the "Push" Email Effectively with Project Site and Discussion Area

The push email is the email sent out with the intent to provide info and draw stakeholders to the discussion area. Here's an example.

The situation is that a complex issue has arisen that may affect the scope and schedule of the project. You, as project manager, plan to send out an ad hoc push email to summarize the issue and connect stakeholders to additional details and to a related online discussion to answer stakeholder's initial questions prior to a decision meeting that must be scheduled two to three weeks out.

In this case, you do not want to overwhelm stakeholders with a complex email. You would rather send them to a space where you can start gathering their input prior to the future decision meeting and avoid inadequate communication or miscommunication.

  • Content paragraph - with header stating that it describes the issue that is causing the project to be red. After the header is a summary, very brief, of the issue and its impact on the project and what is being done. This paragraph must include the "action requested", an appeal to stakeholders that discusses the benefits of their going to the links provided.
  • Links area - Under the content paragraph are direct links, for instance, to the page, file or content that describes the issue in detail. Another link can go directly to the discussion area where you are seeking input and answering questions. These two areas should link to each other as well. Another link can be to the latest status report.

With building the site and the push email covered, questions from readers have now been answered. Thanks for reading my articles, posts and for your active involvement in projectmanagement.com!

 

A Variety of Possible Tools

Here are examples of platforms or applications that are designed to provide information and interaction that can be used in a project environment. You want the ability to create a customized page for your project, to post project files and to create a discussion area.

  • MS SharePoint
  • Microsoft OneNote
  • Dropbox business
  • Google Drive
  • Smart Sheet
  • Open Text ECM
  • Word press
  • Box
  • Evernote
  • Asana
  • Trello
  • Microsoft Teams
  • Jabber
  • Confluence
  • base camp
  • Workplace by Facebook
  • Podio

In a pinch, just a shared drive can be manipulated to meet the design objectives, the "Home" page being a single file.

Posted on: February 17, 2020 10:58 AM | Permalink

Comments (3)

Please login or join to subscribe to this item
Dear Joe
Interesting your perspective on the topic: "Project Site Design for Stakeholders (Part 2)"

Thanks for sharing

Is the combination of website and emails sufficient to manage stakeholder engagement?

I'd be curious on the actual engagement results. Whereas having a centralized at-a-glance display and availability of information is crucial, there is still a level of active engagement needed to help outside stakeholders understand, interact with, and get the most out of the site.

Thanks for sharing.

Please Login/Register to leave a comment.

ADVERTISEMENTS

"Education is an admirable thing. But it is well to remember from time to time that nothing that is worth knowing can be taught."

- Oscar Wilde

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsors