Kicking Scrum to the curb with Kanban

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ThisThis article on the Scrum Alliance site has an interesting take on putting aside Scrum when your requirements change so much that you need Kanban to stabilize your release:
This article on the Scrum Alliance site has an interesting take on putting aside Scrum when your requirements change so much that you need Kanban to stabilize your release:
 
 
It’s a good point to keep in mind that in a situation where requirements keep changing that you need a method that limits work rather than one who’s focus is on releasing the plan.
 
As is always the case with any method or framework, you use what’s the most appropriate and optimal for your project and not because you have a pet method or framework you want to advocate or evangel
This article on the Scrum Alliance site has an interesting take on putting aside Scrum when your requirements change so much that you need Kanban to stabilize your release.  As the author states:
 
From my experience here (and yours will no doubt be different), Kanban is useful when requirements and priorities change quickly and often. If we truly value the principles of the Agile manifesto, then we should welcome changing requirements, even late in development; but in my opinion, Scrum is only good at this when we can handle changing requirements every one to two weeks (I avoid saying four weeks!).
 
This is why Kanban is the unofficial preferred framework for maintenance staff, as it is more concerned with limiting work in progress than it is fulfilling a release plan/backlog. 
 
It’s a good point to keep in mind that in a situation where requirements keep changing that you need a method that limits work rather than one who’s focus is on releasing the plan.
 
As is always the case with any method or framework, you use what’s the most appropriate and optimal for your project and not because you have a pet method or framework you want to advocate or evangelize. 
As is always the case with any method or framework, you use what’s the most appropriate and optimal for your project and not because you have a pet method or framework you want to advocate or evangelize.   articleThis article on the Scrum Alliance site has an interesting take on putting aside Scrum when your requirements change so much that you need Kanban to stabilize your release:
 
 
It’s a good point to keep in mind that in a situation where requirements keep changing that you need a method that limits work rather than one who’s focus is on releasing the plan.
 
As is always the case with any method or framework, you use what’s the most appropriate and optimal for your project and not because you have a pet method or framework you want to advocate or evangelize.  on the Scrum Alliance site has an interesting take on putting aside Scrum when your requirements change so much that you need Kanban to stabilize your release:
 
 
It’s a good point to keep in mind that in a situation where requirements keep changing that you need a method that limits work rather than one who’s focus is on releasing the plan.
 
As is always the case with any method or framework, you use what’s the most appropriate and optimal for your project and not because you have a pet method or framework you want to advocate or evangelize.  
Posted on: June 02, 2013 10:44 PM | Permalink

Comments (4)

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Well I am a project manager and have been going through the guide to Scrum Body of Knowledge by Scrumstudy which provide a complete guide for the scrum project. I highly recommend this books to all those who are planning to implement scrum in your organization. You can go directly to http://www.SCRUMstudy.com for first chapter is available there.

Don,

As always insightful information. I especially agree with your statement,

"As is always the case with any method or framework, you use what’s the most appropriate and optimal for your project and not because you have a pet method or framework you want to advocate or evangelize. "

In spite of what some evangelize, there is no process or tool that works everywhere all the time.

Keep up the great posts!

Thanks for sharing

Interesting view

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