Drunken PM

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Drunken Boxing for Project Managers “The main feature of the drunkard boxing is to hide combative hits in drunkard-like, unsteady movements and actions so as to confuse the opponent. The secret of this style of boxing is maintaining a clear mind while giving a drunken appearance.” Yeah... just like that… but with network diagrams and burndown charts… and a wee bit less vodka.
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Recent Posts

Certified Agile Leadership Training with Olaf

Don Kim - I Think, Therefore I Plan

Agile Coach to Agile Gamer - Peter Saddington

Scrum in School - A Case Study of Grandview Prep's Transformation

Forecasting Tools Based on Team Performance with Troy Magennis

Certified Agile Leadership Training with Olaf

The Trust Artist, Olaf Lewitz, along with his partner, Christine Neidhardt, are gearing ready for their upcoming TrustTemenos Certified Agile Leadership trainings. Certified Agile Leadership trainings are a new, advanced level of training classes being offered through the Scrum Alliance. In this interview Olaf and I discuss the reason for his TrustTemenos CAL class, how it can help people become better Agile leaders, and the value of Certified Agile Leadership.

Safety is a very hot topic in the Agile space right now. During our conversation about safety, Olaf shared one of the most powerful things I have heard during an interview this year: 

“When you talk to people about trust, it rises. When you talk to people about safety, they get scared.”

Every conversation I have with Olaf leaves me more aware and (I hope) a bit smarter than I was when it began. I hope you will get as much value from listening to this as I did from recording the conversation. 

And you can find links to Olaf’s upcoming classes and events, as well as his contact info, below the show notes.

 

 

Show Notes

00:07 Podcast Intro

01:27 Begins

01:57 An overview of Agile Leadership Training

04:48 A skeptical response to the idea of Agile Leadership Training and Olaf’s response

07:16 Developing a thinking model to understand what we need and how that drives our actions

09:11 The power of metaphor in leadership and Dave’s aversion to boats

11:03 Giving people tools to grow their awareness of how they show up

11:34 These classes cover advanced leadership topics - not the basics

12:16 “If you trust in yourself… you will still get beaten by people”

13:05 Skepticism is an important part of any class and any transition

13:32 It’s about being intentional and aware

15:23 There is a specific type of learning that involves being uncomfortable because what you believe is challenged

15:57 Extending the question of leadership beyond work and helping them understand more about their awareness and intention

17:00 Olaf shares a story about his first experience working as a boss

21:29 The advice Olaf about give his 29 year-old self about being a boss for the firs time

22:23 It’s okay to ask for help

24:05 A question about safety and what it means to create a safe space

25:42 When you talk to people about trust, it rises, when you talk to people about safety, they get scared

27:22 What is Certified Agile Leadership Training? What level of knowledge experience do you need to attend?

28:08 What will CAL training do for a leader/manager in an Agile organization?

29:28 Where to learn more about Olaf’s upcoming classes, where you can see him speak and how to get in touch with him if you have questions.

 

Links from the Podcast

Showing Up - the book written by Olaf and Christine https://leanpub.com/showingup

TrustTemenos Leadership Academy: https://trusttemenos.de

Upcoming CAL Trainings - https://trusttemenos.de/certified-agile-leadership-cal1/

Olaf’s session at the 2017 Scrum Gathering San Diego is called: Product Owner: Mapping Dramas and Dreams and it will be held in the Harbor Island 1 room on Monday, April 10 from 1 PM until 2:15 PM For more info on the Scrum Gathering: https://www.scrumalliance.org/sgcal

Contacting Olaf

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/olaflewitz/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/OlafLewitz

Website: http://trustartist.com

Posted on: April 09, 2017 01:55 PM | Permalink | Comments (7)

Don Kim - I Think, Therefore I Plan

A few weeks ago Don Kim put up a blog post challenging the value of certifications. I reached out to Don in hopes of doing an interview about it and found out he’s also written a new book “I think Therefore I Plan”. In this interview we discuss the pros and cons of different certifications, taking an artisan approach to managing projects as well as Don’s new book.

You can find Don’s book here: http://amzn.to/2n7VEHu

You can find Don’s blog post about certifications here: http://bit.ly/2okDUZA

 

 

Show Notes:

00:07 Interview Start

00:30 What is a Human APEE

03:38 What is an Artisan approach to Project Management

05:15 Don’s Philosophy of Project Management

07:22 Trying to slow down and do less

08:21 Don explains his way of approaching project work and the reason for the book

10:56 How has the traditional vs. Agile debate changed over the past few years

12:53 Seeing the value in every project you work on  - regardless of how you got it

16:15 The downside of certifications

17:29 The positive aspects of certifications

18:03 There is more to project management training than just PMP certification

19:48 Making the case for the value certifications can provide and how it can be misunderstood

23:22 Does it make sense for people to want to have a way of gauging their professional achievement?

23:55 What Don expected from PMP certification and how he went deep with the Kerzner to get the most learning out of it (instead of just passing the test)

26:41 Is it the certification that is an issue, or the way people interpret it as an end point rather than a beginning

27:50 An overview of the approach Don’s book takes towards the art of Project Management

30:56 Where you can find Don’s book and how you can reach him with follow up questions

31:54 Podcast Ends

You can reach Don Kim on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/donkim/

Feedback/Comments: drunkenpm@gmail.com

Posted on: March 31, 2017 11:55 AM | Permalink | Comments (7)

Scrum in School - A Case Study of Grandview Prep's Transformation

This podcast features an interview with two educators from Grandview Prep in Boca Raton, FL. Aileen Palmer and Susan Rose have been working with the Scrum Alliance, John Miller and Mike Vizdos to help the school implement Scrum for both the students and school administration. The interview explains how Scrum got started at Grandview, the impact it has had on the students, as well as the benefits and challenges they’ve experienced along the way.

 

 

Show Notes

01:16  Interview Begins

02:01 How Grandview Prep got interested in Scrum

04:59 Agile can be a lot easier for kids than adults

05:52 How Scrum has changed the way the students at Grandview collaborate

06:32 How the kids self-organize to make sure everyone is participating in the work

06:59 How teaching Scrum to a junior in high school impacts their ability to get work done and prepare for college

07:54 How visualizing the work is helping the students understand how to break work down into manageable pieces

08:35 Teaching students and teachers about how to break down the work and plan things out

10:20 Differences between how 1st graders and older kids are using Scrum at Grandview

11:17 The hardest parts of getting started with Scrum in school

13:17 Sometimes the transparency and seeing how much you have to do is overwhelming for adults

14:03 The struggle between Trello and Post-its

14:59 Student rankings and grading at Grandview - and how it has been impacted by Scrum

17:14 How using Scrum has improved the students and teachers ability to give and receive feedback

17:45 The reaction from parents/stakeholders to the introduction of Scrum at Grandview Prep

20:28 What Scrum means for the quiet kids who like to sit back and let others lead and drive the work

21:30 How will Grandview measure success to determine if/how Scrum is helping

22:33 The support Grandview Prep received from the Scrum Alliance 

23:14 Advice for educators who are interested in learning more or trying to implement it at their school 

24:39 How to get in touch with Susan and Aileen to learn more about Scrum at Grandview Prep

26:10 Wrap up

26:48 Podcast End

 

For more information:

 

Grandview Prep Info and Contacts

Grandview Prep
http://Grandviewprep.net

Aileen Palmer
apalmer@Grandviewprep.net 

Susan Rose 
srose@Grandviewprep.net

 

Scrum Alliance Info and Contacts

Scrum Alliance
https://www.scrumalliance.org/

John Miller
agileclassrooms@gmail.com

Mike Vizdos
http://www.michaelvizdos.com/

Heather Leigh
hleigh@scrumalliance.org

Posted on: March 06, 2017 08:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (2)

Podcast Interview with Stephen Denning

My Projects at Work interview with Stephen Denning, author of "The Leaders's Guide to Radical Management" and new board member of the Scrum Alliance.

Posted on: October 02, 2013 11:41 AM | Permalink | Comments (1)

Individual Capacity Calculator

Note: The link to the file has been updated. It can be found here. (3-4-13)

(This is an update to my 10/28/12 post on How to Avoid Overcommitment During Sprint Planning. )

 

For awhile now I have been using an excel spreadsheet I put together to work out the calculations I detailed in the post on avoiding overcommitment. I have also been sharing it with the students in my CSM classes. I recently updated it so that the times allocated for the different Scrum meetings is in sync with the current version of the Scrum Guide and I thought it would be a good idea to post here just in case it can be of help to anyone.

 

In case you missed the earlier post, the intention of this calculator is to help individual team members on a Scrum Team gain a better (more true) understanding of the amount of time the can realistically commit/forecast to be able to contribute to the work the team will do during a Sprint. I have found this to be very helpful for teams who are struggling with understanding their capacity.

 

An example of how this could be used in s Sprint Planning is...

 

1. Once a Scrum Team has forecasted the amount of Story Points it can expect to get through during a given Sprint based on average historical velocity.

 

2. And defined tasks for all the stories.

 

3. And estimated the ideal engineering hours required to complete each individual task.

 

4. And totalled up the collective ideal engineering hours required to complete all the work they are forecasting to complete in the Sprint.

 

5. Each team member can use this calculator to determine how much time he/she can expect to be able to contribute in the Sprint.

 

6. Once each team member has come up with his/her number, you would total those up to get the total amount of ideal engineering hours the Team expects to be able to working during the Sprint.

 

7. If the value resulting from Step 4 is greater than the value from Step 6, then you may need to reconsider the amount of work your team is forecasting to complete in the Sprint, or modify the scope (and tasks) for one of the stories.

 

8. If the value resulting from Step 4 is significantly less than the value resulting from Step 6, you may need to consider adding some additional stories/work into what is being forecasted for the Sprint.

 

* Some teams I have worked with have taken the additional step of applying this technique by work type within a Sprint, i.e. Development, QA, UX, etc.

 

Here is the file

 

This work is licensed under Dave Prior is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.">Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License

Posted on: February 19, 2013 02:31 AM | Permalink | Comments (3)
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