The Reluctant Agilist

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Recent Posts

Descaling the Enterprise w/ James Gifford

Jurgen Appelo - Agility Scales

Head First Agile with Andrew Stellman and Jenny Greene

Making Agile Work at HUGE Inc. w/ Lance Hammond and Robert Sfeir

Reframing Technical Debt as Technical Health - with Declan Whelan

Scaling, Certification Changes & Top Scrum Alliance Initiatives

Lisa Hershman At SG2017 - Scaling, Certification Changes and Top Initiatives at the Scrum Alliance

Scrum Alliance Interim CEO Lisa Hershman shared some time at the 2017 Scrum Gathering in San Diego to talk about the top initiatives being worked on at the Scrum Alliance, including their partnership with Large Scale Scrum, changes to the certification programs and more.

 


 

Posted on: May 05, 2017 02:24 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)

Large Scale Scrum (LeSS)

Scaling Scrum is an ongoing hot topic in the Agile space. For a while the most common answer to the question was scrum of scrums. It's a sensible approach, and it works... up to a point, and then... maybe not so much.

Over the past few years new options have emerged. Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) has gained a lot of attention over the past few years (as well as heated debates), but it is not the only option available. 

Since 2005 Bas Vodde (of Odd-e) and Craig Larman have been working on applying apply Agile and Scrum to very large and multisite product development. The result of this collaboration is Large Scale Scrum (LeSS), a framework that is designed to allow you to take the practices of “One-Team Scrum” and scale it up. One of the great things about this approach is that if you are already working with Scrum at the team level, a lot of the work practices are maintained, so you may encounter less dissonance than you’d experience from introducing an array of new practices and workflows. The idea is to allow room for coordinating more complex efforts while still keeping things as simple as possible. 

LeSS offers two different approaches for scaling up with Scrum.  If you are working with up to eight teams of not more than eight people per team, you would use LeSS. But if you need something larger, LeSS Huge has been used with efforts that involve as many as 2,500 people, all working on a single product. To date, LeSS has been used by product companies, project based companies and by companies that want to develop products internally. 

If you are curious about LeSS, you can check out my podcast interview with Bas Vodde.

And if you want to know more about how it has been applied by organizations like Alcatel Lucent, Bank of America, Nokia, JP Morgan Chase, and others, the LeSS.works website has a number of case studies available here

Posted on: February 18, 2015 12:06 AM | Permalink | Comments (1)

An Interview with Mike Vizdos...

I had the chance to interview Mke Vizdos for a podcast recently. You can find it here

Even if you aren't familiar with Mike, there is still a good chance you are familiar with his work. Here is a list of some of the things he's been up to recently...

Mike Vizdos is  ____(please select from below)____________ 

 X  A Father of two great kids and Husband of an incredible wife

 X  A Certified Scrum Trainer

 X  An Agile thought leader / author who has been talking about enterprise level Agile adoption since before it even occurred to most of us

 X  All about Implementing Scrum

 X  Entrepreneur

 X  One of three guys in a shop working with Lean Startup 

 X  Co-founder and Community Builder of Gangplank RVA  

 X  Podcaster (will link to)

 X  Author of a children’s book illustrated by his son

 X  Founder of Real Scrum Jobs (will link to)

 X  A really nice guy

 X  Way busier than you…

 X  A walking example of how following your passion around certain areas of focus can help you establish an agile work life that is creative, experimental, invigorating, and of course, full of failure in the best possible way.

 X  Is working on applying what he learns daily using “this” cartoon as a reminder:

 

 

 

 

Posted on: October 03, 2013 02:29 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
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