The Reluctant Agilist

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About this Blog

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Recent Posts

Scaling Product Development with Ellen Gottesdiener and Andy Repton

The Elusive Agile Enterprise - A Forbes Insight Report

PMO Agility Canvas 3.0 - Redefining Your PMO for Agile

An Interview with Scrum Alliance Chief Product Owner Howard Sublett

What is Post Agile? with Dhaval Panchal and Michael Tardiff

Abby Fretz - Your Clients Are Your Students

You go to conferences… and there are moments when you pick stuff up that can help you do your job. But, once and awhile, there are those special moments when people share things in sessions that permanently change how you look at the work you do. It’s rare… but it’s awesome. 

That happened for me this September in Memphis at the 2018 Digital PM Summit. I attended a session led by Abby Fretz called "Sustaining the Project Honeymoon Phase: How to Build Effective Client Education.” In the session, Abby drew a connection between the relationship we have with our clients and the relationships students have with teachers. She reminded everyone that all of our clients are not just emotional humans, but they are also family members, friends, and experts, and that we need to care for them as a teacher would care for a student. Moreover, she reminded everyone that as much as we are the teachers of our clients, they are our teachers as well.

I wish someone had said this to me 20 years ago.

In this podcast, Abby and I discuss her session from the 2018 Digital PM Summit, what led her to her metaphor, and how it has impacted her work. There is some powerful stuff in this interview and I hope it will be as valuable for you as it was for me. I am very indebted to Abby for teaching me something that seems like such common sense— I’m a little ashamed I had not though of clients this way before.

Here are some of the links mentioned in the podcast:
Digital Pm Summit: https://bureauofdigital.com/abby-fretz-1/
DPM Philly Meetup: https://www.meetup.com/DPM-Philly/
Louder Than 10: https://louderthanten.com
Eastern Standard: https://www.easternstandard.com


If you'd like to get in touch with Abby you can reach her at:
Web: http://abbyfretz.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/abbyfretz
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/abbyfretz/

Posted on: October 17, 2018 10:03 AM | Permalink | Comments (8)

Billy McLaughlin - 2018 Global Scrum Gathering Keynote

The 2018 North American Global Scrum Gathering kicked off with a keynote presentation that was incredibly unique and inspiring. Billy McLaughlin is a professional guitar player who spent his life working to reach a level of success most musicians only dream about. But just as he reached the top, the tools that got him there began working against him. 

Billy suffers from focal dystonia. You may not be familiar with this condition, but for a professional guitar player, it is one of the the worst things that could possibly happen because it means you can’t do the one thing you have spent your life mastering. 

While something like this might cause a lot of people to give up on their dreams and find something else to do, Billy found a different path. He learned to play the guitar left handed instead of right handed. (Just for frame of reference, imagine learning how to write again, using your opposite hand, but having to write everything backwards… what Billy had to do was harder than that.) 

In this interview you’ll hear Billy explain what focal dystonia is, how it impacted him and how he worked through relearning to play guitar all over again. 

The story is inspiring all on it’s own, but for me, there is something deeper in this story. In the interview you’ll hear Billy talk about the struggle of working through all the relearning and how he stayed motivated and kept at it. While it doesn’t touch the level of complexity that Billy had to work through, there are some parallels to what traditional PMs go through when they have to relearn how to do their jobs using Agile. For me, that journey felt like I was being forced to unlearn everything I had spent years trying to master, and then start over from scratch. Maintaining some level of motivation and not giving up hope was one of the hardest parts of the transformation. This is something Billy and I discuss in the interview, and for any of you who need inspiration from time to time, my hope is that his story will help. 

There is contact info for Billy below, but if you’d like to check out his keynote presentations from other events, you can find them here

Links from the Podcast 

Billy McLaughlin 

Focal Dystonia 

Posted on: May 17, 2018 05:13 PM | Permalink | Comments (8)

Agile in Supply Chain w/ Michael Tibbert and Dhaval Panchal

This podcast features Michael Tibbert and Dhaval Panchal helping me out with a question submitted by a student that focused on implementing Agile in a traditional supply chain organization. We also address the question of whether or not it is easier to implement Agile in a band new organization than it is in an existing one. 

Oh - and also… The Parable of the Watermelon

CONTACT INFO

If you’d like to reach Michael Tibbert, you can find him here:
Twitter: https://twitter.com/mftibbert
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaeltibbert/

If you’d like to reach out to Dhaval Panchal, he’s here:
Twitter: https://twitter.com/dhavalpanchalLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dhavalpanchal/

And if you want to read more about the Parable of the Watermelon

(And in 2 weeks, when he gets his website sorted, that will be added here as well.)

If you have any questions about Agile or Scrum that you’d like addressed in a podcast, just send them to drunkenpm@Gmail.com or DM them to @drunkenpm

Posted on: March 16, 2018 12:24 PM | Permalink | Comments (7)

Scott Ambler - Disciplined Agile Framework

For large scale organizations that need to scale Agile, one of the biggest challenges is selecting the option that will fit best. In this interview Scott Ambler, co-creator of the Disciplined Agile framework offers explains the origin of DisciplinedAgile, what makes it different than the other scaling options  and how to handle some of the more common issues facing traditional orgs that are trying to adopt Agile and handle governance.

 

SHOW NOTES

00:07 Interview Begins

00:35 Background on the Disciplined Agile Framework

01:34 The Origin of Disciplined Agile and what it was designed to help with

05:01 What drives organizations to want one common way to practice Agile 

06:13 How Disciplined Agile responds to the desire for one process to rule them all

08:36 If you support multiple approaches to development, how do you bring it all together from a governance perspective and how do you communicate with management about process and progress?

11:10 If you are going to govern, what should you actually be governing?

12:30 Do we really want the PMO to be in charge of governing all aspects of the work?

13:20 How Disciplined Agile looks at the bigger picture with respect to governance

15:55 Making room for someone who can watch how things are being measured and keeping track of performance

16:39 We do not want to inflict the same process on 50 different teams. We need to up our game and look at the full enterprise picture

17:24 Everything in the complex adaptive system impact everything else in the system

17:56 The difference between Disciplined Agile and the other options for scaling Agile

20:55 There is no such thing as a best practice… EVER

21:08 If you want to be effective, pick and choose the techniques that work for you

22:50 Teaching them how to make decisions on their own, rather than just prescribing a solution

23:15 Getting qualified, experienced coaches to help you adopt Disciplined Agile

25:19 How Disciplined Agile makes sure the people teaching it are experienced it and know what they are doing

26:42 The first step is not to park your brain at the door. Hire someone who has experience and knows what they are doing.

27:25 The legions of Agile coaches … a 4 day class does not make you an experienced expert

28:55 Avoiding the trap of hiring “experts” who have merely completed few days of training

30:20 Making the case to senior leadership for taking a more mindful approach, despite the additional risk and effort

31:36 If it took your organization decades to get into the state they are in now, it is not going to go away overnight

32:50 The investment is more than just dollars

34:44 No matter how good we are, there is always something more we can tweak to get better

35:12 Organizations need to wake up, observe and have an honest discussion - make the bigger picture obvious

36:47 If you want to get in touch with Scott

37:44 Scott’s upcoming speaking events

38:22 Interview Ends

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON SCOTT AMBLER AND DISCIPLINED AGILE

http://scottambler.com

http://www.disciplinedagiledelivery.com

https://disciplinedagileconsortium.org

Posted on: March 05, 2018 09:52 PM | Permalink | Comments (6)

Head First Agile with Andrew Stellman and Jenny Greene

Andrew Stellman and Jenny Greene are back with a new book “Head First Agile: A Brain Friendly Guide to Agile and the PMI-ACP Certification”, which offers a strong foundational understanding in the most widely used Agile practices. The book is also intended as a PMI-ACP Exam preparation resource, providing complete coverage of the material included on the certification exam. 

In this podcast, Jenny and Andrew explain why they wrote the book, how PMI-ACP has evolved and why reaching a level where you are no longer concerned about the tools you use to get work done are traditional or agile is a great place to be.

SHOW NOTES

  • 01:19 Interview Begins
  • 01:50 Background on Jenny and Andrew
  • 03:30 Who the book IS NOT for 
  • 04:48 Who is book IS for and how it can help you move beyond simply going through the motions
  • 06:29 The debate over principles vs. practices and it has impacted Andrew and Jenny’s approach
  • 11:55 If you are new to Agile of have no experience working with Agile practices, how can this book help?
  • 14:32 Why PMI-ACP prep is the secondary goal of this book. (And what the primary goal is.)
  • 16:05 How the PMI-ACP exam has evolved and how Jenny and Andrew approached the topics for this book
  • 19:23 How the authors ensured the book covers 100% of the material included on the PMI-ACP exam
  • 20:21 Is is harder for a PMP to learn Agile, or harder for an Agilist to learn traditional Project Management?
  • 21:40 Reaching the “Ri” level of project management where Agile vs. Waterfall is no longer a concern
  • 22:43 Agile has moved beyond software, even reaching into construction, and how the is impacting PMI’s approach to Agile
  • 24:46 Agile and the PMO: Is the PMO a dead man walking?
  • 26:10 Scaling Agile is large organizations
  • 27:44 What is the most dynamic/challenging area of Agile that we need to pay attention to?
  • 28:29 Getting in touch with Andrew and Jenny

THE BOOK

You can find “Head First Agile: A Brain Friendly Guide to Agile and the PMI-ACP Certification” here: https://www.amazon.com/Head-First-Agile/dp/1449314333/

CONTACTING THE AUTHORS

If you’d like to reach Jenny and Andrew, here is how to find them:

 

 

 

Posted on: November 09, 2017 11:22 PM | Permalink | Comments (8)
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