The Reluctant Agilist

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About this Blog

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Recent Posts

Scaling Product Development with Ellen Gottesdiener and Andy Repton

The Elusive Agile Enterprise - A Forbes Insight Report

PMO Agility Canvas 3.0 - Redefining Your PMO for Agile

An Interview with Scrum Alliance Chief Product Owner Howard Sublett

What is Post Agile? with Dhaval Panchal and Michael Tardiff

Jeff Sutherland - The Scrum@Scale & Scrum Alliance Partnership

Last week, at the 2018 North American Global Scrum Gathering, the Scrum Alliance and Scrum co-founder, Dr. Jeff Sutherland, announced the creation of a new joint venture to train, coach, and promote Scrum@Scale. Scrum@Scale is an extension of the Scrum Framework that is designed to deliver business Agility across an entire organization.

I was fortunate enough to have the opportunity to to sit down with Jeff during the Scrum Gathering and ask some questions about his partnership with the Scrum Alliance, Scrum@Scale, and how it can help organizations achieve greater business Agility.

Links from the Podcast

If you’d like to read the press release on the joint venture, you can find it here: https://tinyurl.com/yc5z4w3p

Here is a link to the Scrum@Scale Guide

Here is a link to Jeff's latest book, "Scrum, The Art of Doing Twice The Work In Half The Time".

Contacting Dr. Jeff Sutherland

If you’d like to contact Jeff you can reach him at:

Posted on: April 26, 2018 07:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (11)

The Scrum Guide - 2016 Update

The Scrum Guide is the official document defining Scrum as per its’ creators, Ken Schwaber and Jeff Sutherland. It’s been translated to 28 languages and no matter where you are working, if you are doing Scrum (or trying to do Scrum), it is the official explanation of what it is and how it is supposed to work.

This summer, Ken and Jeff updated the document for the first time since 2013. In the new (2016) version, they’ve made one significant change. They added an explanation of the Scrum Values. The intention is to provide more clarity on the intention behind these practices.

“If they embrace those values, if they cherish those values, it would create a culture that would help people work together in small Scrum teams and even larger groups … I think it’s important that people understand that with them, Scrum is a place you want to live, without them, it’s a place you wouldn’t want to be.”
~Ken Schwaber

If you’d like to see a video where Ken and Jeff, along with JJ Sutherland, explore the history of the document and the changes they’ve included, you can find it here:  https://youtu.be/0hRZffDD1ec

Part of the drive for these changes has been driven through feedback provided by the user community. For the creators, it’s not a change so much as an explanation intended to provide greater clarity behind Scrum and what it takes to make it work well within an organization by providing a great place to work.

The Scrum Values are:

  • Commitment
  • Courage
  • Focus
  • Openness
  • Respect 

One of the most important aspects of this change is that it speaks to one of the stumbling blocks many organizations experience when trying to adopt Scrum. They pick up some (or all) of the practices and go through the motions. But without spending the time needed to help the Scrum Team, and the larger organization, understand the intent behind this way of working, Scrum may bang up against the wall of legacy culture. The practices are important, but if you can’t shift the approach people bring to doing this stuff, it can be a huge struggle to achieve the promise that Scrum offers. 

One personal note about the Scrum Guide… I consider myself to be deeply familiar with this document because of the fact that I make my living teaching Certified Scrum Master and Certified Scrum Product Owner classes. I look at it frequently while I am teaching and preparing for classes. What I’ve learned over time is that this is not a document you can read once and feel like you “get it”. It is important to go back to it and review it from time to time, trying to approach it with fresh eyes. Every time I do, I find something new in there that I thought I understood, but which catches me by surprise.

If you’d like to find the updated version of the Scrum Guide you can download it here: http://www.scrumguides.org 


You can also download an audio version (compliments of Mike Vizdos) here: https://www.implementingscrum.com/scrum-guide/

Posted on: August 04, 2016 02:40 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
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