Project Management

The Reluctant Agilist

by
2018 Digital PM Summit | 2018 North American Global Scrum Gathering | 3PVantage | Abby Fretz | Adam Weisbart | Agile | agile | Agile 2013 | agile 2014 | agile 2015 | Agile 2017 | Agile 2018 | Agile Alliance | Agile and AI | Agile Centre | Agile Certification | Agile Coach | Agile Coaching | agile coaching | Agile Estimation | Agile for Humans | Agile Layoffs | Agile Leadership | Agile Metrics | Agile Planning | Agile PM | Agile PMO | Agile Practice | Agile Project Management | Agile Retrospectives | Agile Teams | Agile Transformation | agile transformation | Agile Transition | Agile Uprising | Agile Virtual Summit | agile2014 | agile2015 | agile42 | AgileUprising | Agilist | Agilistocrats | Agility Scales | AI Agile Guy | AI and Agile | Alistair Cockburn | Amitai Schleier | Applied Frameworks | Atlassian | autism | Bas Vodde | Becky Hartman | Behavioral Change | BigVIsible | BigVisible | Bob Tarne | book review | Braden Cundiff | Brandon Brown | Brett Harned | Brian Bozzuto | Bureau of Digital | Business Agility | business agility | CAL | Cara Turner | Carol McEwan | carson pierce | Center for Non-Violent Communication | Certification | Certified Agile Leadership | Certified Scrum Master | Certified Scrum Product Owner | Certified Scrum Trainer | ChatGPT | Cheif Product Owner | Chet Hendrickson | Chris Li | Chris Sims | Christine Converse | Christopher Avery | Coaching | Collaboration | collaboration | Collaboration Equation | commitment | conflict management | Connection | conteneo | Craig Larman | cross functional teams | Crosswind | CrosswindPM | CSM | CSP | CSPO | CST | Culture | DA | DAD | Dan Eberle | Daniel Gullo | Dave Prior | Dave West | David Anderson | David Bernstein | David Bland | David J Anderson | Dean Leffingwell | Declan Whelan | Definition of Done | Dennis Stevens | Derek Huether | derek huether | Design | Design Thinking | Dhaval Panchal | Diana Larsen | diana larsen | Digital Agency | Digital PM Summit | Digital Transformation | digitalpm | Disciplined Agile Delivery | Distributed Teams | Don Kim | DPM | dpm | dpm2013 | Drunken PM | drunken PM | drunken pm | Drunken PM Radio | drunken pm radio | DrunkenPM | drunkenPM | drunkenpm | DrunkenPM Radio | drunkenPM Radio | drunkenpm radio | drunkenpmradio | drunkepm | eduscrum | Elsevier | emotional intelligence | empathy | Enterprise Agile | Eric Tucker | Essential Scrum | Esther Derby | esther derby | Evolve Agility | Excella | Five Lenses of Humane Management | Fixing Your Scrum | Flow | Flow Metrics | Focused Objective | focused objective | Forecasting | Gangplank | George Schlitz | Gil Broza | Global Scrum Gathering | Grandview Prep | Howard Sublett | Improv | Improv Effect | Individuals and Interactions | Jason Tanner | Jean Tabaka | Jeff Howey | Jeff Patton | Jeff Sutherland | Jesse Fewell | Jessie Shternshus | Jim Benson | jim benson | Jira | Johanna Rothman | johanna rothman | John Miller | john miller | Jukka Lindstrom | Jurgen Appelo | Jutta Eckstein | Kanban | kanban | Kanban Pad | kanbanfor1 | Karim Harbott | Ken Rubin | Kenny Rubin | Kim Brainard | Knorr-Bremse | lacey | Language | Large Scale Scrum | Larry Maccherone | Laura Powers | LAVM | LeadingAgile | Lean | lean | Lean Agile Intelligence | Lean Agile Visual Management | Lean Coffee | Lean Kanban North America | LeanKit | LESS | LeSS | LeSS 2018 | Linda Rising | Lithespeed | Live Online | lkna | Louder Than Ten | luke hohmann | lyssa adkins | Management | Managing for Happiness | Maria Matarelli | Mark Kilby | Mark Lines | Marshall Rosenberg | Melissa Boggs | Metrics | metrics | Michael Grill | Michael Sahota | Michele Sliger | Mike Cottmeyer | Mike Vizdos | Modern Management Methods | Modus Cooperandi | modus cooperandi | Modus Institute | Natalie Warnert | Negotiation | Nic Sementa | Non-violent communication | North American Global Scrum Gathering | NVC | Obeya | Olaf Lewitz | Øredev | Øredev 2013 | organizational agility | Organizational Change | overcommitment | Pairing | Patrice Colancecco Embry | Paul Hammond | Personal Agility | Personal Kanban | personal kanban | personal productivity | personal project management | Peter Green | Peter Saddington | PMBOK | PMI | PMI Fellow | PMI-ACP | PMO | PMP | podcast | portfolio management | Precoil | Product Backlog | Product Development | Product Goal | Product Management | Product Owner | Product Ownership | Productivity | productivity | Project Management | project management | Project Management Institute | Project Manager | ProKanban | Rachel Gertz | Rally | Release Planning | Reluctant Agilist | reluctant agilist | Remote Teams | Renata Lerch | Responsibility Process | retrospective | Richard Cheng | Roman Pichler | Ron Jeffries | Ross Beurmann | Ryan Ripley | SAFE | Safety | Sallyann Freudenberg | Sanjiv Augustine | Sarah Klarich | Scaled Agile Framework | Scaling Agile | scaling agile | Scaling Scrum | Scott Ambler | Scrum | scrum | Scrum Alliance | Scrum at Scale | Scrum Certification | Scrum Gathering | Scrum Gathering 2018 | Scrum Guide | Scrum in Schools | Scrum Master | Scrum.org | ScrumMaster | self organizing teams | SGNYC20 | SGPHX | SGPHX 2015 | Shane Hastie | Snehal Talati | social engineering | Software Development | SolutionsIQ | SoundNotes | SparkPlug Agility | Sparkplug Agility | Sprint Goal | Sprint Planning | sprint planning | Story Points | Sustained Agility | Systems Thinking | TDD | Temenos | Testing Business Ideas | The Improv Effect | The Reluctant Agilist | Things | Tom Perry | Tony Johnson | Transformation | Trauma | Tricia Broderick | Troy Lightfoot | Troy Magennis | troy magennis | Trust | Untapped Agility | User Stories | value | Value Delivery System | Value Stream Mapping | Virtual Training | Vivek Angiras | Volunteering | waste | Waterfall | Weisbart | What We Say Matters | why limit wip | WIP | women in agile | Woody Zuill | XP | Zach Stone | show all posts

About this Blog

RSS

Recent Posts

How to Pick the Right Scrum Training For You with Vic Bonacci

Making Sense of Co-Pilots, Agents, and Changes in AI with Snehal Talati

Successful Distributed Teams with Jim Benson and Mark Kilby

Developing Trust In Your Organization w/ Gil Broza

Deliver Better Results with Gil Broza

Categories

&Human,   reluctantagilist,  Agile Practice Guide,  Dave Prior,  Johanna Rothman,  LeadingAgile,  PMI,  reluctant agilist, 20 Hour, 2017 Digital PM Summit, 2018 Digital PM Summit, 2018 Digital Pm Summit, 2018 North American Global Scrum Gathering, 2018 Scrum Gathering, 2019 NAGS, 2019 North American Global Scrum Gathering, 2019 Scrum Gathering, 3PVantage, 4-Hour Body, 4-Hour Chef, 4-Hour Work Week, 5S, 6 Enablers of Business Agility, 7 Rules for Positive Productive Change, A Life of Productivity, a-team, Aakash Srinivasan, Aaron Irizarry, Abby Fretz, Active Listening, Adam Weisbart, Adaptivity, Adaptivity Group, ADDIE, Adding Work to Sprints, Adrenalline Junkies, Adrian Howard, Agency, AgencyAgile, Agile, Agile, agile, Agile 2013, agile 2014, agile 2015, Agile 2017, Agile 2018, Agile 2018 Keynote, AGile 2019, Agile 2019, Agile Adlibs, Agile Alliance, Agile and AI, Agile and Artificial Intelligence, Agile and Jazz, agile and lean program management, Agile and Waterfall, Agile and Waterfall Planning, Agile Antipatterns, Agile Assessment, Agile at Home, Agile Atlas, Agile Austin, Agile Baltimore, Agile Bear, Agile Business, agile caravanserai, Agile Centre, Agile Certificaiton, Agile Certification, Agile Classroom, Agile Coach, Agile Coaching, agile coaching, Agile Coaching Ethics Initiative, Agile Coaching Income Report, agile coaching institute, Agile Coaching Layoffs, Agile Coffee, Agile Cognitive Bias, Agile Conference, Agile Development and Design Techniques, Agile Digital Agency, Agile Enterprise, Agile Estimation, Agile Ethics, Agile Fluency, Agile for All, Agile for Humans, agile hardware, Agile Heretic, Agile in 3 Minutes, Agile in Digital, Agile in Education, agile in education, Agile in the Wild, Agile Layoffs, Agile Leadership, Agile Management, Agile Manifesto, agile marketing, agile marketing academy, Agile Metrics, Agile Mindset, Agile Mini Con, Agile Negotiation, Agile outside of Software, Agile Path FM, Agile Physics, Agile Planning, Agile PM, Agile PMO, agile portfolio management, Agile Practice, Agile Product Development, Agile Project Management, agile project management, Agile Project Manager, Agile Quantified, Agile Retrospectives, Agile Risk Management, Agile Roles, Agile Schools, agile schools, Agile Steve, Agile Teams, Agile Tracking, Agile Transformation, Agile Transformation, agile transformation, Agile Transformation Office, Agile Transformation Playbook, Agile Transition, Agile Tribes, Agile Uprising, Agile Velocity, Agile Virtual Summit, Agile-Lean-NYT, agile2014, agile2015, agile2015 agile 2015, agile42, Agile4All, AgileAI, AgileBrain, AgileClassroom, AgileCraft, AgilePathFM, AgileScout, AgileUprising, Agilist, Agilistocrats, Agilitrix, Agility Prime Solutions, Agility Scales, AgilityScales, AI, AI Agile Guy, AI and Agile, AI and Scrum, Ainsley Nies, Al Goerner, Al Goernor, Al Shalloway, Alan Dayley, Alex Brown, Alistair Cockburn, Amitai Schleier, Analytics, Anderson Diniz Hummel, Anderson Hummel, Andreas Schliep, Andrew Leff, Andrew Stellman, Andy Jordan, Andy Repton, Angela Harms, Angie Stecovich, Anna Beatrice Scott, Anti-pattern, Antipattern, Antipattern. Agile, Anu Smalley, Applied Frameworks, Applying Metrics for Predictability, Archetype, Art of Coaching, art of war, Artificial Intelligence, Artificial Intelligence, Assumptions, Assumptions Mapping, Atif Rafiq, Atlassian, Atlassian Analytics, Atlassian Experience Canvas, Audreww Tara Sahota, autism, AVS, Backlog Refinement, baker, Bas Vodde, Becky Hartman, Bees, Behavioral Change, behavioral science, Bernie Maloney, Beyond Legacy Code, Beyond User Stories, Big Consulting, Big Visible, BigVIsible, BigVisible, Billy McLaughlin, bimodal, Bjorn Jensen, Black Lives Matter, Blackie, Blake Halvorson, Bland, blocked, blockedapp, blueprint, blueprint education, Bob Payne, Bob Sarni, Bob Tarne, book review, Boozy Scrum, Braden Cundiff, Brandon Brown, Brandon R. Brown, Brent Beer, Brett Harned, Bria Johnson, Brian Bozzuto, Broza, Build Your Own Scrum, Building Trust, Bureau of Digital, Business Agility, business agility, Business Agility Canvas, Business Model Canvas, Business Planning, Business Portfolio Management, business value estimation, Buzzword, CAL, Canton Coders, Capala Consulting, CapEx, Cara Turner, Career Development, Career Path, Cargotec, Carol Dweck, Carol McEwan, carson pierce, Cass Van Gelder, Catherine Louis, Celeste Giampetro, Center for Non-Violent Communication, Certification, Certified Agile Leadership, Certified Scrum Master, Certified Scrum Master, Certified Scrum Product Owner, Certified Scrum Product Owner, Certified Scrum Product Owner Scrum, Certified Scrum Professional, Certified Scrum Trainer, Cesar Idrovo, Change, Change Fatigue, Change Management, Change Management, change management, Change Managment, Changing Sprint Commitment, Charlie Rudd, Charlotte DiBartolomeo, Charter, Chat GPT, ChatGPT, Cheif Product Owner, Cheif Scrum Master, Chet Hendrickson, Chief Product Owner, Chief Scrum Master, Chief ScrumMaster, Chief SM, ChowNow, Chris Bailey, Chris Clarke, Chris Geary, Chris Li, chris matts, Chris Murman, Chris Sims, Chris Spagnuolo, Christina Bang, Christine Converse, Christine Li, Christine Neidhardt, Christopher Avery, christopher hadnagy, Client, Climate, cnvc, Coach's Clinic, Coaches Clinic, Coaching, coaching, Coaching Certification, CodeX, Collabnet, Collaboration, collaboration, Collaboration Equation, Collaborative Teamwork, Colleen Johnson, commitment, Communication, Communication Plan, Community, Comparative Agility, Comparing Teams, Conference, Conference Proposal, Conflict, conflict, conflict facilitation as a leadership skill, conflict management, Connecting, Connection, Conscious Communication, Consulting, conteneo, coppertone, Core Cycle of Agile Product Development, Counteracting The Systemic Oppression of Traditional Development Thinking, Couple of Coaches, Cozy Juicy Real, Craig Larman, Creative Courage Summit, Creativity Safety, cross functional teams, Cross Functionality, Cross-Functionality, CrossFunctionality, Crosswind, CrosswindPM, CSM, CSM, CSP, CSP Fast Pass, CSPO, CSPO, CST, cst, Cultivating Transformation, Cultural Change, Culture, Customers, Cutlefish, Cycle Time, DA, DAD, Daily Scrum, Damon Poole, Dan Brown, Dan Eberle, daniel goleman, Daniel Gullo, Darkest Timeline, Darren Petersen, Daryl Kulak, data, Data-Driven Change, Dave Prior, Dave Prior, Dave Prior, Dave prior, Dave West, David Anderson, David Bernstein, David Bland, David Hawks, David J Anderson, David Marquet, Dean Leffingwell, Dean Stevens, Decision Making, Declan Whelan, Decoupling Cadences, Definition of Done, Deliver Better Results, Delivery, Delivery Better Results, Denise Jacobs, Dennis Stevens, Derek Heuther, Derek Huether, derek huether, Descaling Agile, Design, Design Thinking, Designing Together, Devin Hedge, DevSecOps, Dhaval Panchal, Diana Larsen, diana larsen, Digital Agency, Digital PM Summit, Digital Pm Summit, Digital PM Summit 2014, Digital Project Management, Digital Transformation, digitalpm, digitalpm dpm, Directing, Disciplined Agile, Disciplined Agile Certification, Disciplined Agile Delivery, Disciplined Agile Framework, Discover to Deliver, Discovery Curves, Distributed, Distributed Team, Distributed Teams, Distributed teams, Diversity, Dom Price, Don Gray, Don Kim, Don McGreal, DPM, dpm, DPM 2014, DPM 2017, DPM Philly, DPM Summit, DPM Summit 2017, DPM Summit 2018, dpm2013, Dr. Rick Brinkman, DragonForceSUCKS!, Drunken PM, drunken PM, drunken pm, Drunken PM Radio, Drunken PM radio, drunken PM Radio, drunken PM radio, drunken pm radio, drunken pm radio, drunken pm radio, DrunkenPM, DrunkenPm, drunkenPM, drunkenPm, drunkenpm, drunkenpm, drunkenpm, DrunkenPM Radio, drunkenPM Radio, drunkenPM radio, drunkenpm radio, drunkenpmradio, drunkepm, ducks, Eastern Standard, eckstein, edu scrum, Education, eduscrum, Edward Kay, Eight Shapes, Elizabeth Harrin, Elizabeth Hendrickson, Elizabeth McClellan, Ellen Gottesdiener, Elsevier, Elusive Agile Enterprise, Emily Epstein, emotional intelligence, Emotional Science, empathy, employment, Empowerment, english heritage, Enterprise Agile, epic bedtime story, Eric Tucker, Erich Hahn, Erika Lenz, Essential Scrum, Esther Derby, esther derby, Estimating, Ethics, EVEF, Even Better Podcast, Evernote, Every Voice Engaged, Evolve Agility, EvolveAgility, Excella, excella, Excella Consulting, Executive Coaching, Experience, Experience Map, Experiments, Explore It!, extreme manufacturing, Extreme Programming, Facilitation, fading problems, Failing Sprints, Fearless Agility, FearlessAgility, field guide, Film Making, Film Production, First 20 Hours, First15, Fit for Purpose, Five Lenses, Five Lenses of Humane Management, Fixing Your Scrum, flavio steffens, FLEX, Flight Levels, FLIP, Flip, Flow, flow, Flow Metrics, Focused Objective, focused objective, FocusedObjective, Forbes, Forecasting, Formula Ink, FormulaInk, Frank Vega, Fred George, Frederick Taylor, freudenberg, Funding, Future of Agile, Games, Gangplank, Gary Gagliardi, gender bias, Gene Bounds, generation agile, Geoffrey Moore, Geographically Distributed Teams, George Floyd, George Schlitz, George Schlitz, Gil Broza, Giora Morein, girl scouts, Girls Guide to PM, girlscouts, Github, Glassel Ventures, Global Congress, Global Scrum Gathering, Global Scrum Gathering Austin, Grandview Prep, Greenhopper, growth mindset, Habit, HappyCog, Harvard Business Review, HBR, Head First Agile, Healing Container, Hearst Digital Media, Heart of Agile, High-Performing Team, Homeschooling, Hong Li, Hope Schools, Howard Sublett, HUGE, HUGE Inc, Human Resources PM, Human Side of Agile, Hummingbird Agility, Hybrid, hybrid, Hybrid Agile, Hyderabad, hyperfocus, I Think Therefore I Plan, Iain Fraser, ICAgile, Ice Breaker, Ideation Framework, Ignite, Igniteii, Ilker Demirel, Implementing Scrum, Improv, Improv Effect, ImprovEffect, Improving Scrum.org, improvisation, Increment of Work, independent consulting, Individuals and Interactions, InfoQ, infrastructure, Innovation, innovation games, Insighttimer, InspireMe!, Insurgent Agility, Insurgent Pictures, Intent Based Leadership, International Consortium for Agi, Introvert, intuition, IT Funding, IT Strategy, it's not all about me, IT-Agile, J.B. Rainsberger, Jabe Bloom, Jack Skeels, Jacquelyn Talpalar, James Gifford, James Grenning, James Tamm, Jardena London, Jargon, Jason LIttle, Jason Tanner, Jasper, Jean Tabaka, Jed and Sophia, Jed Lazar, Jeff Howey, Jeff Patton, Jeff Sutherland, jellybend, Jennifer Tharp, Jenny Greene, Jerry Weinberg, Jesse Fewell, Jessica Katz, Jessica Kerr, Jessica Small, Jessica Wolfe, jessica wolfe, Jessie Shternshus, Jill Paul, Jim Benson, jim benson, Jim Elvridge, Jim Tamm, Jimi Fosdick, Jira, Jira Insights, JJ Sutherland, Joe Justice, Joe Vallone, Joel Norman, Johanna Rothman, johanna rothman, John Cutler, John D Cook, John Le Drew, John Miller, john miller, John Rudd, John Tanner, Jorgen Hesselberg, Josh Wexler, Journey to Enterprise Agility, Juan Banda, Judith Lasater, Judy Neher, Jukka Lindstrom, Jurgen Appelo, Justin Handler, Justin Koke, Jutta Eckstein, kamal manglani, Kanban, Kanban, kanban, Kanban Certification, Kanban Metrics, Kanban metrics, Kanban Pad, kanbanfor1, karen prior, Karim Harbott, Kate Sullivan, Katherine Kirk, Kelly Harris, Ken Rubin, Ken Schwaber, Kenny Rubin, kevin mitnick, Keynote, Kid Cedek, Kim Brainard, Knorr-Bremse, Krista Pierce, Kyle Macey, L. David Marquet, lacey, LAI, Lance Hammond, Language, Language is a virus, Large Scale Scrum, Larissa Scordato, Larman, Larry Maccherone, Larsen, Lasater, Laura Powers, LAVM, Layoffs, Lead Without Blame, Leadership, Leadership, Leadership Gift, Leadership Gift Program, Leadership is Language, Leadership Mindset, Leading Change, LeadingAgile, Lean, lean, Lean Agile Intelligence, Lean Agile Visual Management, Lean Coffee, Lean Kanban North America, Lean Kanban University, lean metrics, Lean Startup, Lean Systems Engineering, Lean-Agile, Lean-Agile Visual Management, LeanAgile Intelligence, LeanCoffee Meetings, Leanintuit, LeanKit, Lee Lis, Leffingwell, lego game, LESS, LeSS, LeSS 2018, Lessons Learned, Lia James, lie to me, Lifestyle Design, Liftoff, Linda Rising, Lisa Hershman, Listening, Lithespeed, Live Online, lkna, Lothar Schubert, Louder Than Ten, louder than ten, Lounder>10, LSE, Luis Garcia, Luke Hohman, luke hohmann, Lullabot, Lyssa Adkins, lyssa adkins, Macromanagers, Magennis, Major League Baseball, Malena Jacobsen, Manage Others, Manage your Organization, Manage Yourself, Management, Managing for Happiness, Managing Multiple Projects, Managing the Unmanagable, Managing Up, Manny Gonzalez, Manoj Vadakkan, Marc Johnson, marcello scacchetti, Maria Matarelli, Mario Melo, Mark Crowe, Mark Hodgdon, mark inside, MARK KILBY, Mark Kilby, Mark Lines, Mark Price Perry, Marketing and Sales, marketing user stories, Marshall Rosenberg, marshamallow challenge, Marty Bradley, Mary Kaufmann, Mastodon Consulting, matt barcomb, Matt Payton, MBOK, McGraw-Hill, Measuring Agile, Meditation, Meghan McInerny, Melissa Boggs, Melissa Watts, Mentoring, Merchi Reyes, MetalToad, Metrics, metrics, Metrics Cookbook, Michael de la Maza, Michael Grill, michael lewis, Michael Sahota, michael spayd, Michael Tardiff, Michael Tibbert, Michele Sliger, Michelle Dennis, Mickey W. Mantle, Mid Sprint Review, Mid-Sprint Review, MidSprint Review, Mika Trottier, Mike Anderson, Mike Caddell, Mike Cottmeyer, Mike Griffiths, Mike McCalla, Mike Monteiro, Mike Vizdos, Millenial, Minneapolis Scrum Gathering, mistakes, mitch lacey, MLB, MMM, Mob Programming, mob programming, Mobbing, Mode 0, Mode 1, Mode 2, Modern Management Methods, Modus, Modus Cooperandi, modus cooperandi, Modus Institute, Molood Ceccarelli, moneyball, Monte Carlo Analysis, Monte Carlo Simulation, motivational interviewing, Munich, MVP, NAGC, Nanette Brown, Natalie Warnert, Negotiation, neuro-diversity, Neurodiversity, Neuroinclusivity, neurolinguistic programming, New York Times, Nic Sementa, Nigel Baker, ninja, ninja baker priest, NLP, No, No Estimates, Non Violent Communication, non-fiction, non-fiction writing, Non-violent communication, Nonviolent Communication, noop, North American Global Scrum Gathering, Not a Cylon, NVC, O3 World, Oakbay, Oakbay Consulting, oakland a's, Obeya, Object-Oriented Data-Driven Change, off shore, Offshoring, Olaf Lewitz, Olav Maassen, OnAgile 2017, one shiny object, Online Scrum Class, OnPay, Øredev, Øredev 2013, Organizational Agility, organizational agility, Organizational Change, Organizational Change, organizational change, Organizational Design, Outcome Based Planning, Overcomitment, overcommitment, Overplaying, PAC, Pairing, Pam Corbin, Parikshit Basrur, paris, Patrice Colancecco Embry, Patrice Embry, patrice embry, Paul Argiry, paul ekman, paul f. kelly, Paul Hammond, Pebble Post, Peopleware, Performance, persona, Personal Accountability, Personal Accountability Teams, Personal Agility, personal agility canvas, Personal Kanban, personal kanban, Personal Productivity, personal productivity, personal project management, Personas, Persuasion, Peter Beck, Peter Green, peter green, Peter Saddington, Peter Stevens, Philadelphia, Philamade, Philip Diab, Phoenix, PI Planning, pk, Planning, Planning Poker, play, PMBOK, PMI, PMI ACP, PMI Agile Practice Guide, PMI Board of Directors, PMI Fellow, PMI Global Congress, PMI-ACP, PMO, PMP, PMP vs Agile Project Manager, podcast, Poker Planning, Portfolio Management, portfolio management, Portfolios (PPM), Post Agile, Post-Agile, Post-SAFeism, Power of Focus, Power of No, Precoil, predictability, Presentation, Presenting, priest, Principles of Scientific Management, Prioritization, Prioritizing Work, Probabilistic Forecasting, Produce Backlog Item, Product, Product Agility, Product Alignment, Product Backlog, Product Backlog Refinement, Product Design, Product Development, Product Funding, Product Goal, Product Innovation, Product Management, product management, Product Manager, product manager, Product Outcomes, Product Owner, product owner, Product Ownership, Product Ownership Strategic Priority, Product Positioning, Product Roadmap, Productivity, productivity, Productivity Project, Professional Development, Professional Kanban Certification, Professional Scrum Master, Professional Scrum Product Owner, Program Management, Programs (PMO), Project CodeX, project empathy, Project Funding, Project Management, project management, Project Management for Humans, Project Management Institute, Project Management Rebels, Project Manager, project manager, Project Managment, project portfolio management, Project Review, project risk, ProjectManagement.com, Projet Chartering, ProKanban, Proxy Interviews, PSM, PSM, PSPO, PTSD, Public Speaking, QA Manager, Qcon, Quality, Quality of Life, Quarterly Planning, Questions, Rachel Gertz, rachel gertz, rachel howard, Radical Collaboration, Radtac, Rally, Rapid Testing Business Ideas, Ray Lewallen, Reaktor, real options, Rebecca Wirfs-Brock, Recess, Redefining the PMO, Redefining Your PMO, redkiteproject, REE, Reese Schmit, Release Planning, Reluctant Agililist, Reluctant Agilist, Reluctant Agilist, Reluctant Agilist, reluctant Agilist, reluctant agilist, Remote, Remote Facilitation, Remote Forever, Remote Forever Summit, Remote Learning, Remote Team, Remote Teams, remote teams, Remote Work, RemoteForever, Renaissance Enterprise, Renata Lerch, Resiliency, Resource Management, Responsibility Process, retrospective, retrospectives, review, Ricard Vargas, Richard Cheng, richard cheng, Rick Brinkman, Right Environment Exercises, Risk, Robert Sfeir, robin dreeke, Roman Pichler, Ron Jeffries, Ron Lichty, Ronica Roth, Rosenberg, Rosetta Agile, RosettaAgile, Ross Beurmann, rothman, Russell Healy, Ryan Ripley, SAFE, SAFe, SAFe Summit, Safety, Sal, Salary, Salary Negotiation, Sallyann Freudenberg, sallyanne freudenberg, Sam Barnes, San Tsubota, Sanjiv Augustine, Santa Pays it Forward, Sarah Goff-DuPont, Sarah Klarich, Sauce Labs, Savannah Rayat, Saying No, Scaled Agile Framework, Scaling, Scaling Agile, scaling agile, Scaling Scrum, scatter focus, scatterfocus, schmonz, Schmonz.com, School of Rock, Science of High Performing Teams, Scientific Management, Scott Ambler, Scott Bellware, Scott Dunn, Scott Sehlhorst, Scrum, Scrum, scrum, Scrum Agile Transformation, Scrum Alliance, Scrum Alliance, Scrum and AI, Scrum Artifacts, Scrum at Scale, Scrum Certification, Scrum Certification, Scrum Certified Scrum Trainer, Scrum Educational Units, scrum field guide, Scrum Fieldbook, Scrum Gathering, scrum gathering, Scrum Gathering 2018, Scrum Gathering Dublin, scrum gathering paris 2013, Scrum Guide, Scrum in Education, Scrum in Realty, Scrum in Schools, Scrum Inc, Scrum Labs, Scrum Master, scrum master, Scrum Master Antipatterns, scrum metrics, Scrum Team, Scrum Trainer, Scrum Training, Scrum vs. Kanban, Scrum.org, Scrum.org, Scrum@Scale, ScrumAlliance, ScrumatScale, Scrummando, ScrumMaster, Scrummaster, ScrumMaster Scrum Master, self organizing teams, Servant Leader, servant leadership, SEUs, SGNYC20, SGPHX, SGPHX 2015, Shane Hastie, Shannon Carter, Shit bad Scrum Master's Say, Showing Up, Sinikka Waugh, SIQ, situational leadership, Six Enablers of Business Agility, Snehal Talati, Social Change, social engineering, Software Development, Software Testing, Solutions IQ, SolutionsIQ, SONSI, Sophia Lazar, Soulful Transformation, SoundNotes, Spark Plug Agility, SparkPlug Agility, Sparkplug Agility, Speaking, speedboat, Sprint, Sprint Backlog, Sprint Commitment, Sprint Forecast, Sprint Goal, Sprint Length, Sprint Planning, sprint planning, Sprint Review, Sprints and Milestones, Square, Staffing, Steffan Surdek, Stellman-Greene, stephen forte, Stephen Younge, Steve Elliott, Steve Holyer, Steve Winters, Steven Martin, steven slade, Stewart Copeland, stonehenge, Story Mapping, Story Points, Story Points Are Trash, Storylines, Strategic Funding, strategy, Strategyzer, stress, Successful Distributed Teams, Sun Tzu, Supply Chain, Sustained Agility, Suzanna Haworth, Suze Haworth, Swarming, Systems Thinking, Tabaka, TAC, tactical, tactics, takedown, Tall Projects, TaskTop, tastycupcakes, Taylorism, TDD, Team Building, Team Charter, Team Performance, Team Size, Team Structure, Teams, teams in crisis, Technical Debt, Technical Health, Technical Lead, Technical Manager, Technical Program Manager, Technical Project Manager, Temenos, Template Zombies, Tera Caldwell Simon, Test Drive Development, Test Driven Development, Test Obsessed, Testing Assumptions, Testing Business Ideas, The Agile Path, the airplane game, The Art of War, the grifters, The Improv Effect, The Leadership Gift, The Productivity Project, The Red Kite Project, The Reluctant Agilist, The Ron, The Ticket That Exploded, Theory of Constraints, theStrayMuse Louder than Ten, Things, Think Louder, ThinkLouder, Throughput, Tim Ferriss, Tim Ferriss Experiment, Tim Lister, Tim Wise, TJay Gerber, To Be Agile, Todd Miller, Together To Gather, Tom Beurmann, Tom Mellor, Tom Perry, Tom Smallwood, tom wujec, Tonianne DeMaria, Tonianne DiMaria, Tony Johnson, Toyota, Tracking and Reporting, Training from the Back of the Room, Transformation, Transformation Blockers, Trauma, trauma, Travis Gertz, Trello, Tribes, Tricia Broderick, Troy and Abed In The Morning, Troy Lightfoot, Troy Magennis, troy magennis, Trust, TrustTemenos, Turn The Ship Around, Twitch, Tyler Grant, TynerBlain, Ukraine, Unicat, unmasking the social engineer, Untapped Agility, Upstream Work, Urs Reupke, User Stories, User Story Points, Utilization, value, Value Delivery, Value Delivery System, Value Management Office, Value Matrix, Value Stream Management, Value Stream Map, Value Stream Mapping, value stream mapping, Velocity, velocity, VersionOne, Vic Bonacci, Virtual Training, Vision Statement, Visual Agile Lexicon, Visual Management, Vivek Angiras, Vizdos, VMO, Volunteer, Volunteering, Waltzing with Bears, waste, Waterfall, Weisbart, Wesibart, What We Say Matters, why limit wip, Wikispeed, William Burroughs, Wingman-SW, WIP, women in agile, Woody Zuill, Work Item Age, Worker Owned Coop, Worker Owned Cooperative, XP, XPRolo, yellowpencil, Your Clear Next Step, Yvonne Marcus, Zach Stone, zach stone, Zeldman, Zen-PM

Date

Untapped Agility with Jesse Fewell


In this very special video episode of the podcast, I’m joined by Jesse Fewell, whose new book Untapped Agility is full of insights, tips, and tactics that you can use to help gain support for your adoption of Agile. Jesse and I go way back. We worked together a lot during the initial phases of getting The Project Management Institute and the Scrum Alliance to talk back in 2009-2010. It was great to catch up with him and I highly recommend his new book. 

 

You can find Jesse’s book here:
https://amzn.to/2ZaWFTQ

You can contact Jesse here:
Web: https://jessefewell.com
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jessefewell/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/jessefewell

Posted on: February 12, 2021 10:40 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)

Disciplined Agile Training Event Recap with Tony Johnson

This is part 2 of my interview with Tony Johnson from Crosswind PM. In this part of the interview Tony and talk through his recent experience attending a Disciplined Agile Training event held by PMI. We also share our thoughts and opinions on why PMI acquired Disciplined Agile and Flex and how we are expecting that to impact the Project Management community. 

In the first part of the interview, which you can find here, Tony and I discussed some of the upcoming changes to the Project Management Institute's Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK), how that will impact the PMP Exam, and the impact you can expect it have on your work in PM. 

If you’d like to reach out to Tony with follow up questions:

Web: crosswindpm.com
Email: [email protected]
Twitter: twitter.com/crosswindpm

Posted on: May 12, 2020 08:05 AM | Permalink | Comments (1)

Personal Kanban - Week 3

 

Off the Rails…

 

It was all going so very well. By the start of the 3rd week I was beginning to get the hang of the process. I wasn’t a shining model of productivity, but I was certainly making improvements.  I was learning a lot about how I worked and what I needed to do to become more productive. I had started making notes about all the experiments I wanted to run in the coming weeks.  I was keeping my PK Journal up to date. The only issue was that I hadn’t tried it with real work yet because I was also still on staycation. (I travel a lot for work, so when it comes to vacation, I’m totally happy to just spend the time at home becoming fully present with what a bad decision it was for someone who is horribly allergic to cats to adopt three of them.) Being at home for the first part of this experiment had allowed me to establish the physical habits of personal kanban and my hope was that this would keep me rooted in the practice once I was on the road again.

So naturally, the obvious next step was to completely screw that all up.

I had planned to be away on a retreat for a few days during the 3rd week. While I was there I picked up a slight cold that immediately turned me into a walker for about 8 days. Both of these events meant that for a period of almost 2 weeks, I was completely unable to do work on anything on my board.

Failure Bow

So… time for a Failure Bow
 


 

(If you aren't familiar with the Failure Bow, I'd like to recommend watching the Matt Smith TED talk below.)

 

While it would be easy to rip myself up for losing step, I knew that was going to happen at some point. What I was more interested in was what it would take for me to recover when it did happen.

Since I’d been keeping detailed notes on what was and was not working I turned to those to try and see what issues were causing the biggest trouble.

 

“Hi, My name is Dave… and I’m a Things-aholic.”
 

I was still using Things every day. I was recording tasks on my board and working them, but there were additional items in Things that I worked on and they never made it to the Kanban board. Most of them were personal items, but it did seem kinda of pointless to me to be working with two tools at once. It just divided my focus and make getting anything done that much more complicated.


I decided that I was going to start capturing everything I do on the board. I took everything listed in Things and created a post it for each item. I sorted and grouped the whole thing on my Kanban board. My plan was to try and go one week without using Things. During that time I would rely 100% on the Kanban board.

I made some modifications to the layout of my board as well. I added blocked boxes for some of the swimlanes and also made adjustments to my WIP limits.

I decided that I would start each day with (re)prioritization

I had learned that travel can have a very negative impact on working this way. I had a number of jobs coming up that would require travel. So, I decided to start researching electronic tools so I could test one out during my next trip.

One of the things I have found to be invaluable in this whole process is having the physical board to return to when things break down. There have been a number of events and situations that resulted in me needing to reset my approach.  I’ll be posting about them in the coming weeks. For anyone who is going to try personal kanban, my first advice would be to start out with a physical board and develop good habits with your practice. These will be an important touchstone for you as you work through the changes this approach will have on your work.

The final thing that came out of my retrospective for iterations 3 and 4, was a new question… what should I do about recurring tasks? Was it really going to be worth creating post-its for recurring each item so that there was a card for each one on each day of the week? That seemed ridiculous. I had no answer, but sometimes, just having the question is a good start. 

Posted on: March 12, 2013 03:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (2)

Sprint Retrospectives

If you are accustomed to working within the context of a traditional approach to managing projects you are probably familiar with the idea of doing a post mortem, or review at the end of a project. The objective of this meeting (or set of meetings) is to examine what has taken place and find a way to generate lessons learned which could be used to improve future efforts.  In theory, this sounds like a great idea. In practice, however, there are two problems with this approach. First, they are rarely done with the regularity, or rigor required for them to truly add value. More often than not, team members are reassigned and send off to work on new projects before the project review can be conducted. Second, when project reviews are conducted, it is typically to focus only on the things that went wrong. Unfortunately, this often turns into a finger pointing session that does little to recognize the things that went right, and often is more centered around hanging blame on individuals than on determining the practices or processes that allowed the trouble to start in the first place. There are, to be sure, exceptions to the above, but in a traditional model skipping this critical step is far too common.

Repeatedly taking the time to examine how things are going is something that is baked right into an Agile approach. Scrum, for example, is defined as being built on “three legs”: transparency, inspection, and adaptation. If you are practicing Scrum, each Sprint includes the Sprint Retrospective, a “ceremony” where the team meets privately to inspect how they are working and to determine what steps they need to take in order to improve during the next Sprint. While a disciplined traditional approach may include a review at the end of each project (or ideally, the end of each phase), in Scrum, this happens every 2-4 weeks. It is the last official thing a team does during each Sprint.

The Scrum framework offers a more lightweight approach than you’ll have under a more traditional methodology like the one defined in PMI’s Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK). Because Scrum has removed so much of the process overhead, one of the things that teams come to depend on is the cadence of Scrum. We begin each Sprint with our Sprint Planning meeting; we hold a Daily Standup (or Scrum) meeting each day (at the same time in the same place); we hold a Demo (or Review) meeting with the stakeholders at the end of the Sprint and we follow that up with the Sprint Retrospective. Each of these practices provides opportunities to inspect and adapt, but it is the Retrospective meeting where the team comes together privately to exhale at the end of the Sprint and work out how they, as a unit, can become more effective.

Another interesting aspect of the Sprint Retrospective is the way the meeting is conducted. Teams will often start by focusing the positives and identifying what went right during the Sprint. Even if the Sprint did not go well, there is always something positive that can be gleaned from it.  When the team talks about what could have gone better, the goal is to offer constructive criticism geared towards enabling them to function better as a unit. The subtle shift in from focus on “you” to “we” is a very important cultural change for those of us making the switch from a traditional approach. Before the Sprint Retrospective ends, the team will come up with an action plan for the next Sprint so that they can do more of the good things they’ve identified and take steps to correct some of the things that did not go as well as they could have.

If you are new to Agile, it may seem unnecessary to hold reviews with the frequency called for by Scrum - especially if things appear to be going well. Many rely on the old adage, “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”. The problem with that approach is that it becomes far to easy to overlook things until a time when they are so clearly broken, that there is no way back. If we are always inspecting and adapting, we are far more likely to catch things while we still have the ability to make any necessary adjustments.

If you are interested in learning more about Retrospectives, there is a great book by Esther Derby and Diana Larsen called Agile Retrospectives: Making Good Teams Great.

Posted on: September 14, 2011 10:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)

Following up on Commitment, Evolution and Britney Spears

Since I posted my comments on the change to the Scrum Guide, I have had the chance to teach two Certified Scrum Master classes.  Despite my issues with the change, my desire to be transparent about things won out. I am still teaching commitment and explaining why, IMHO, it is so critical to the Team. However, I am also explaining the change in the most recent Scrum Guide and the argument for use of the word “forecast”. In both cases this has generated some healthy discussion within the class and my hope is that the participants will leave the class well enough informed to make up their own minds about it. 

Talking through the commitment vs. forecast question in the class offered a great example of one of the truly awesome things about Agile. Regardless of which flavor(s) of Agile you are working with you can expect that the standard will continue to evolve and change – and that is baked right into the different frameworks. So, as the workscape continues to grow and transform, expectations for productivity continue to increase and as knowledge workers continue evolving how they approach the overwhelming volume of information they have to deal with on a daily basis, it is safe to say that the techniques we apply in Agile will continue to evolve as well. This may not sound significant on the surface, but I would like to offer two points to illustrate why I believe the organic nature of Agile is so critical.

1.     Knowing that you are working with a methodology or framework that is going to continue to evolve and change places a different sort of demand on the practitioner. When working with a standard that is more, or less, locked down, many people reach a point where they believe they have finished learning it. Hopefully this is more the exception than the rule, but the problem is that they are able to get to this point in the first place. With a standard that is not locked down, that continues to keep pace with the changing workscape, the only way for the worker to remain viable is to continually grow their own knowledge and experience in step with the practice.  This forces Agile practitioners to approach their work as a learning experience, which requires a level of awareness and attentiveness that is not called for  by someone who has already “learnt” it.

2.     For the practices themselves, once they are locked down, the change control process can become such a burden that the framework, or methodology becomes static. As soon as this happens, it begins to lose its’ ability to provide value in a continuously evolving workscape. If Critical Chain really was the last new tool added to the PMBOK, than that means that the process most of us have come up with reached a static point during a time when:

·      Most of us used Windows 98 or NT

·      Most of us probably got online using AOL and a 14.4 Baud dial up modem

·      The iPod did not exist

·      We had never heard of Monica Lewinsky

·      We had never seen the Matrix

·      We were probably still watching George Clooney on E.R.

·      We were still two years away from hearing the phrase “Hit Me Baby One More Time.”

It is clear that our world of work has changed significantly since 1997. The way we deal with our work has also changed significantly since then. Why then, wouldn’t we require that of our process as well?

Posted on: August 23, 2011 11:50 AM | Permalink | Comments (2)
ADVERTISEMENTS

"To stimulate creativity, one must develop the childlike inclination for play and the childlike desire for recognition."

- Albert Einstein

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsors