The Critical Path

by , ,
Welcome to The Critical Path--the home for community happenings and events on ProjectManagement.com! This is where you'll find community news, updates, upcoming events, featured member posts and more. We'll also be showcasing hot topics in the project management arena and bringing you interviews with industry experts. The Critical Path is our primary way of getting news out to members, so be sure to check back for updates!

About this Blog

RSS

View Posts By:

Marjorie Anderson
Kimberly Whitby
Laura Schofield

Past Contributers:

Carrie Dunn
Danielle Ritter
Kenneth A. Asbury
Craig Dalrymple
Rebecca Braglio
Kristin Jones

Recent Posts

PMBOK® Guide – Seventh Edition Volunteer Opportunities for Translation Validation

What are Performance Domains, and Why Should I Care?

Thank You For All Your Support!

PMI Educational Foundation Open House - Happening Today!

Busting Standards Myths

PMI Educational Foundation Virtual Open House – 3 December 2019


PMI Educational Foundation Virtual Open House – Join Us to Celebrate Giving Tuesday!

If you are interested in learning how to use your project management skills for social good and also want to pick up a few PDUs, then this exciting LIVE event is for you!

In the spirit of Giving Tuesday, PMI and the PMI Educational Foundation (PMIEF) have joined forces to offer practitioners a unique opportunity to learn how to:

Give back

Impact youth around the globe

Interact with fellow project managers

Grow your professional development portfolio

Ask the PMIEF team questions and much more

We are offering a robust and interactive digital experience for this year’s annual event.  Participants can watch webinars, read articles and participate in discussions about how to get involved and – more importantly – why it matters.  Not to mention, project managers can earn up to 3 PDU’s for the day, just by participating!

A Few FAQs:

Event date: 3 December 2019

Where: ProjectManagement.com

Question: What can I do now to prepare? Answer: Click here to learn more about PMIEF

We hope you’ll join us on 3 December 2019 for an informative day of giving back.

Be sure to mark your calendars now!

Posted by Kimberly Whitby on: November 20, 2019 09:40 AM | Permalink | Comments (17)

November Community News You Can Use

With November’s arrival and the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday here in the U.S., I can’t help but to think about everything there is to be thankful for. I am certainly grateful to those that have welcomed me into the PMI community; to our volunteers who lend their time and expertise for webinars, events, articles, and blogs; and to all of our amazing community members that make ProjectManagement.com a welcoming, informative, and engaging space for Project Managers. With an attitude of gratitude, here’s a look at what’s happening around the community in your November Community News You Can Use:

View the PMI® Business Analysis Virtual Conference 2019 On-Demand: If you were unable to attend the recent PMI® Business Analysis Virtual Conference, you can view all of the sessions on-demand here. This virtual event explores the latest trends in business analysis and provides you with the insights, resources, and tools to advance your career and enhance project success.

Discover PMI - Ask Us Anything! Series: Learn more about PMI’s knowledge resources by joining the next session on November 19thAll Things Project Management: Navigating PMI’s Knowledge Resources – featuring Shari Rathet.

Save-the-Date for PMI® EMEA Congress 2020: The event will be held 14-16 June in Prague, Czechia! Stay tuned to PMI.org for more information.

Community Central: Visit the Community Central discussion forum for all things community, including site news, announcements, and all your ProjectManagement.com questions! Join in the Hot Topic discussions on the 1st and 15th of each month, learn about your fellow community members, and share your thoughts!

ProjectManagement.com Social Media: In an effort to streamline how we engage members in the social media space, we have moved ProjectManagement.com’s Facebook activity to PMI’s main Facebook account.  You’ll still find all of the posts you know and love, but now in one place! For the time being, Twitter and LinkedIn accounts remain unchanged. You can find all of the Facebook excitement here, and we’ll keep you updated of any other changes!

Change Management Webinar Series: Each month, a group of volunteers delivers a webinar as part of the Change Management Webinar Series, exploring various change management topics, practices, and insights. On December 4th, Samuel Holcman will present on The Hard Part of Digital Transformation – Addressing Business and Organizational Change. Register here

Disciplined Agile Blog: Learn more about pragmatic agile and lean strategies in Scott Ambler’s blog, Disciplined Agile. In his latest post, he discusses Planning: When Have We Done Enough?.  

If you have any questions, please feel free to reach out to a member of the Community Engagement team – we’re happy to help you. As always, stay tuned to the Critical Path for your community news!  

Posted by Laura Schofield on: November 14, 2019 11:04 AM | Permalink | Comments (15)

A Story of Monks, Trees, and New Horizons for the Evolution of the PMBOK® Guide

By Maria Cristina Barbero, PMI Standards Member Advisory Group

The Black Monks, so called in reference to the color of their religious tunics, are monks of the monastic Catholic religious order who follow the Rule of Saint Benedict. This Rule provides some guidelines for monastic life where reading is one of the compulsory activities built into a monk’s very regimented schedule. In the 6th century one of them, Cassiodorus, pushed the practice of copying texts of all kinds over just reading them. Copying texts became an important part of life in monasteries.

So, in the Middle Ages monasteries and monks were hubs of culture. Monks were sharing a seat and desk with other monks in “scriptoria” (open spaces for writing activities) where they were dedicated to conserve the biblical knowledge over a world of wars, famine, and epidemics simply through copying texts. To be honest, it was not just about biblical texts but also grammar and later encyclopedias that constituted the body of knowledge these monks wanted to conserve with their work. And, again, it was not just copying. It was also about adding or integrating these texts with something new they could capture during other monks’ travels. The final aim was to transfer this knowledge to posterity as well as have a base for training young pupils, usually sons of princes, kings, and other nobles.

 Let’s focus on how the bodies of knowledge were growing,   transforming, and adapting to new discoveries. In medieval   Christianity all that was known was represented as a static   pyramid having few possibilities of evolution (for example, the   Great Chain of Being is a hierarchical structure of all matter and   life, derived from Plato and Aristotle, and thought to have been   decreed by God). Later, the most common representation of   knowledge changed to a tree—the pyramid had been rotated. The tree can expand and evolve. You can add branches and leaves. Seeds generate new trees.

Nowadays a body of knowledge is intended to be a complete set of concepts, terms, and activities that make up a professional practice, as defined by the relevant learned society or professional association. These bodies of knowledge in general evolve in accordance with the “tree model.” The body of knowledge of project management (PMBOK® Guide) is defined by PMI “as a term that describes the knowledge within the profession of project management.” PMI recognizes that the body of knowledge of project management has no definable limits and that “no single book could contain the entire PMBOK.” Therefore, PMI developed and published the PMBOK® Guide which is intended to be a guide to this vast body of knowledge.

The PMBOK® Guide has been for years perceived and used by trainers, consultants, and project managers worldwide as a “golden box” where the knowledge of project management was maintained. Since 1996, like other bodies of knowledge, it is a tree that continuously evolves. More content is added periodically to the constellation of knowledge elements that a project manager should know and use (practices, tools, techniques, skills).

The “tree model” survived for centuries. It is just in the last thirty years that things dramatically accelerated the demand for a new model of representing knowledge and bodies of knowledge. Change enablers include the web, user media and devices, micro-computing, 3rd party platforms, Internet of Things, availability of large volumes of data, communications strengthening, and overall the willingness of humanity to share their own experiences and contribute directly to the growth of knowledge in most sectors and industries.

 Several new contents are available and today each   single body of knowledge potentially collides with other   bodies of knowledge and requires a representation that   is a web where new branches of the original tree draw   over branches of other trees.

Therefore, the evolution of the PMBOK® Guide had to be rethought and that’s what PMI and volunteers did over the last couple of years. My colleagues already introduced areas of change in the PMBOK® Guide and in The Standard for Project Management.

What I want to remark on here is my thoughts on the intrinsic why of this big shift that is not a whim but, more than ever, a need. PMI cannot evolve the body of knowledge following a “tree model” simply adding branches and leaves to the body of knowledge, but must open it to future evolutions in a modern multidisciplinary and digitized context. The structure has to support the evolution of knowledge while at the same time providing a framework that better represents the interaction of a system of systems that influences project performance.

I think this approach to the evolution of the PMBOK® Guide will enable the reasoned and appropriate maintenance of the evolving knowledge and practice of project management.

 

Posted by Marjorie Anderson on: November 08, 2019 10:57 AM | Permalink | Comments (12)

Navigating Complexity in Project Management

by: Federico Vargas Uzaga, PMBOK® Guide-Seventh Edition Development Team member

Much is being talked about Value Delivery nowadays. As a matter of fact, many would consider that this is THE major discussion today in the world of project management. If you think about it, value delivery is actually nothing new. Organizations have always embarked on projects to create products (outputs) that would allow them to achieve benefits (outcomes) and hence create value. However, the discussion and positions around the topic have created a division between those who believe a particular way of delivery is the right one and those who disagree as they believe a different approach is needed.

I personally believe that the conditions in which projects are being developed today, with higher levels of uncertainty and complexity, are the cause of such discussion, and that the same conditions require project leaders to make better strategic decisions within their projects to cope with and balance risk exposure in them.

As we know, the risks associated with a project depend, among other things, on the work that needs to be performed and uncertainty determined by the level of clarity or definition of the project’s output and the level of expertise that the project team has.

Taking those two aspects into account, the complexity of the work can be overwhelming and, if not navigated consciously, lead to poor or failed outcomes. The role of the project manager has certainly changed and transmuted requiring a more strategic focus to make better choices regarding delivery life cycles, organizational structure, and development methods. But the focus must remain on delivering outcomes that lead to value creation.

I believe that project management practitioners who survive, thrive, and transform the world are the ones that understand how strategic their role is. These project leaders will navigate through complexity while balancing risk exposure. I suggest that navigating complexity is a fundamental requirement of all projects to one degree or another and is, therefore, a core principle of project management.

Posted by Marjorie Anderson on: October 30, 2019 07:57 AM | Permalink | Comments (6)

Register for our next “Discover PMI - Ask Us Anything! Webinar

Categories: webinar

Our next “Discover PMI - Ask Us Anything!” webinar, is scheduled for Tuesday, 19 November 2019 at 12:00PM EST. As previously posted, the format, which is executed through non-PDU bearing webinars, is meant to encourage conversation with various PMI departments. Simply put, members having a one hour Q&A session with a particular PMI department. We're thrilled to have guest speaker, Shari Rathet, along with her fellow colleagues, guide you in understanding the different types of content available and how to access them. They will demonstrate how we have recently improved the PMI.org search function and how to make your own contribution to this valuable collection and share your expertise with other practitioners. 

PMI Members can register at the following link: https://www.projectmanagement.com/webinars/567133/Powering-Your-Career-with-PMI--Explore-the-PMI-Job-Board-to-Power-Your-Chttps://www.projectmanagement.com/webinars/586102/All-Things-Project-Management--Navigating-PMI-s-Knowledge-Resources-. We hope you will join us!

As always, Our project is YOU. Your successes and setbacks, your passions and peeves—we want to hear about them all, and help you get to where you're going today and tomorrow. We hope these webinar series guide you in the right direction. As always, your feedback and ideas are most welcome!

Posted by Kimberly Whitby on: October 24, 2019 06:20 PM | Permalink | Comments (12)
ADVERTISEMENTS

I lie every second of the day. My whole life has been a sham.

- George Costanza

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsors