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Agile versus Waterfall in Software Projects

Collective Knowledge

Last Responsible Moments

Donald Rumsfeld and Project Management

Kaizen or Kaikaku?

Last Responsible Moments

Last Responsible Moments

By John Herman   PMP, CQE, MPM

Lean Software Development is an agile software approach based on the lean concepts of Value Streams, and the work of Taiichi Ohno, who is considered the father of the “Toyota Production System” and “Lean Manufacturing”.  Using the lean philosophy, Lean Software Development developed six best practices that continue to influence Agile methodology.  The six are:

  • Optimize the Whole
  • Defer Commitment
  • Deliver Fast
  • Eliminate Waste
  • Build Quality In
  • Empower Team Learning

No doubt today’s Agile methods have seen benefit from Lean Software Development, which originated in the early 2000’s.  The discussion of all six best practices is too much for a single blog posting, but I’d like to draw your attention to the second, “Defer Commitment” for a short lesson in agile risk management, and software project methodologies. 

In an earlier blog entry, I discussed Alexander’s Question, and Last Responsible Moments are generally based on those building blocks.  While Alexander’s Question encourages deferring decisions until certain critical information can be obtained or better understood, the Lean “Defer Commitment” states that the best possible solution can emerge by deferring design until the Last Responsible Moment.

The Last Responsible Moment occurs when any advantages of acquiring additional information are offset by potential risks of delaying a decision any longer. 

Note that there can be several such moments within any project or iteration, with aspects of the design and process in opposition to various risks, with overlap and feedback mechanisms also within consideration.  If it was easy, anyone could do it, right?

Thus the Last Responsible Moments, and the practice of Defer Commitment in general, are dependent on solid risk management.  This point is invaluable in any debate regarding the viability of agile methods when unknowns and risks are running rampant, and especially in defense of agile methods from those who are entrenched in Traditional Waterfall software development methods. 

I urge you to continue to evaluate each software project’s methodology based on the project itself, and without any preconceived notions regarding the best approach, until the Project Management team has gathered as much information about the project as it can.  Which is, of course, a Last Responsible Moment.

 

Posted on: January 24, 2017 03:52 PM | Permalink | Comments (5)

Kaizen or Kaikaku?

Kaizen or Kaikaku?

By John Herman   PMP, CQE, MPM

 

Kaizen is a Japanese word that means improvement.  When used in business or quality settings, it generally means continuous improvement, and is associated with cyclic activities like Deming’s Wheel (Plan-Do-Check-Act) and Six Sigma DMAIC. 

Kaikaku is a Japanese word that means “radical change”.   Kaikaku is associated with radical (innovative) change.  So yes, recent discussions about kaizen and continuous improvement possibly acting as impediments to innovation have some truth to them.  

Both Kaizen and Kaikaku are concepts associated with the “Lean” philosophy and strategy (www.lean.org).  While Kaizen is evolutionary and focused on incremental improvements, Kaikaku is revolutionary and focused on radical improvements. 

Kaizen and Kaikaku are both important processes.  It’s interesting that the Lean/Quality/Six Sigma profession embraces Kaizen, which is a cyclic activity not greatly different from an Agile project management approach.   Meanwhile, those same quality professionals are often suspicious of the sudden change of Kaikaku, which is similar to the “big bang” Waterfall approach to Project Management.  In the PM field, the Waterfall approach has been stalwart across many decades, while Agile is just now catching up.  

Both Kaizen/Kaikaku and Agile/Waterfall are important processes.  There are situations and opportunities for each.  In the Lean/Quality/Six Sigma profession, it is well recognized that when change is introduced by Kaikaku, it is important to follow up with several cycles of Kaizen to improve and refine the change.   As PM’s, we should plan to have several Agile cycles shortly after the Go-Live of a Waterfall project, to fine-tune the results and capitalize on any improvement opportunities.   

Posted on: November 25, 2015 03:14 PM | Permalink | Comments (11)
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