Project Management

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​The ultimate Guide to a 100% PMBoK Guide aligned Project ​Management Plan

Mind Mapping for Project Management – an overview (updated!)

Situational Project Management

Introducing "MP4PM-MindmaPping for ProjectManagement" - Part III

Introducing "MP4PM-MindmaPping for ProjectManagement" - Part II

​The ultimate Guide to a 100% PMBoK Guide aligned Project ​Management Plan

developing PMP teaser

Intro


​​Can I ask you a question?

In your opinion, what would you get from your project management colleagues if you asked them for a sample of the project management plan?

Well, I bet most of them would send you a schedule created with MS Project or (even worse) MS Excel. Some will send you a sample project charter, and others will even send you a project status report based on MS Powerpoint or something similar ...

Try it out! Am I right? I guess, yes...

Few may know that a well developed and created project management plan is much more than the examples above. And even fewer could send you a sample since they have already created a project management plan for their projects!

After studying this guide, you will be asked for this support in the future as you will be an expert in creating a relevant project management plan and have the appropriate tools and techniques.

Here we go:


The Concept of the Management Plans


Management plans document the strategy and approach for managing the project and project processes in terms of scope, timing, cost, quality, resources, communication, and risk, as well as Procurement and stakeholder management.
This means that each knowledge area has its own management plan that documents the strategy and approach for project management in that specific project. These plans are essentially a set of documents with processes, procedures, practices, and standards that the project team will follow to ensure consistent results.

When creating a management plan, ask yourself always this question: 


"How do I define, plan, manage and control the scope (or schedule, costs, quality, etc.) of my project?"

You think ahead and document how you will manage each knowledge area (and ultimately the project) based on its specific needs, How you will manage each knowledge area during execution, and how you will monitor and control each knowledge area. These efforts should cover all aspects of the project.
You also need to think about who is involved in the project and how you will behave. Managing these people, evaluating their work, and motivating them. Management plans are necessary and unique to each project, The format, and level of detail of management plans should be adapted to the needs of the project and the style of the project leader, and the organizational influences.
If you have not yet created management plans for your projects in practice, this concept can be difficult to implement in the beginning. However, you will quickly realize the benefits of creating management plans. Therefore we want to illustrate the concept with an example:

With regard to the cost management plan we would ask ourselves the following questions (and answer them in the cost management plan!):

"How will we ensure that all costs are identified and estimated?"

"Who will be involved in the cost estimation?"
 
"What methods for estimating the costs that we will use? "

"What historical records, processes and organizational requirements must be used or met? "

"Which estimation tools and techniques will we use? "

"What is the appropriate level of accuracy?"
"How will financing and cost constraints be constrained in determining the budget?"
 
"Which data, metrics and measurements do we need for cost planning?"

So far to the planning part.

The executive part of a management plan focuses on the processes and procedures involved in carrying out the work.

The executive component of a cost management plan answers questions such as (but not limited to):

"Which cost data is needed?"
"Who is responsible for the collectionof the cost data?"
"Where will we collect the raw data that will later be used for monitoring and control?" 

The monitoring and control component of a management plan defines the processes and procedures to measure project progress, compare actual project results with the plan, and determine how to deal with deviations that require change.
 


The Project Management Plan - understanding its Purpose

What we have discussed in the previous section applies to all the specific management plans (Scope, Time, Cost, Quality, Communication, etc.) you will develop for your project throughout the planning phase and iterations. And all those single management plans (plus some additional components we will discuss in a second) combine to the so-called Project Management Plan.  

The Project Management Plan is more than just a workbook to determine what work needs to be done. The Project Management Plan is a continuous document that controls the following elements: 

■ Provide Structuring 

The Project Management Plan is developed to create a structure within which the project can develop until successful completion. It is a careful but accurate collection of documents that serve as a reference point for all project execution, monitoring and control, and project or phase completion.

■ Provide documentation

A truly successful project requires a documented Project Management Plan. Documents provide a historical overview and the reasons why decisions were made the way they were made. A Project Management Plan must include documentation of the assumptions and constraints that influence the development of the project management plan. Both the size of the project, the application environment within which the project operates, and the business environment factors can all influence the level of detail provided by the project management plan.

■ Enable communication 

Project Management Plans are documents that provide information and explanations as to why project decisions have been made, as documented. The Project Management Plan serves as a source of communication between stakeholders, the project team, and management to communicate how the project is managed.

■ Provision of baselines

A Project Management Plan contains several baselines. As the project progresses towards completion, management, stakeholders, and the project manager can use the Project Management Plan to see what has been predicted in terms of cost, scheduling, quality, and scope, and then compare how these predictions will compare with actual project progress.

The Complete Guide for developing a Project Management Plan contains the following sections: 

  • Intro
  • ​The Concept of the Management Plans​
  • The Project Management Plan - understanding its Purpose
  • Preparing for the Project Management Plan development
  • Application of tools and techniques
  • Use of a project management information system
  • Components of the Project Management Plan
  • Putting it all together
  • Exercise: "What are the specific actions required to create a project management plan that is bought into, approved, realistic, and formal?"
  • Baselining the Project Management Plan
  • Benefits of a Project Management Plan
  • Project ​Management Plan Example and Template
  • Tailoring Tips for your Project Management Plan
  • How to create a customized Project Management Plan - Step-by-Step

 

For further information please refer to my profile here at pm.com. 

Thanks and kind regards,

Markus

Posted on: December 13, 2019 10:58 AM | Permalink | Comments (9)

Situational Project Management

https://goo.gl/yjMrMb

The one thing that we all really like about project management is how unpredictable days can sometimes be, right? I come to the office in the morning with a clear plan of what I’m going to do and then something happens. I love this challenge because as a project manager, I now have to re-evaluate the situation and change my plans accordingly.

But there is more to it than just responding with a knee-jerk reaction. These times demand situational awareness, and you need skill and finesse to handle changing demands effectively. Situational awareness is an important skill to build as a project manager and in this article we’ll look at what it is and how you can use it on your projects.

Contents

1. What is Situational Awareness?
2. What is Situational Leadership?
3. How To Apply Situational Awareness
4. How to Make A Situational Assessment
5. Situational Leadership: Team Development
6. Making An Ethical Situational Assessment
7. Developing Your Situational Awareness

https://goo.gl/yjMrMb

This article is based on an interview that was recorded with Oliver Lehmann, MSc., PMP. The interview was done because “Situational Project Management” was recently added to the Project Management Professional (PMP)® Exam Content Outline, and Oliver has published a book on the topic (see link below).

So if you are currently in the middle of your PMP exam prep, then you can expect to see questions about situational project management on your exam. Therefore the article is not intended as a book review but as an introduction to the topic.

For more information about the book go here:

https://goo.gl/UnZ00W

Posted on: January 27, 2017 08:59 AM | Permalink | Comments (4)

PMBOK® Guide 6th Edition will be released in Q3/2017 - what will change? - UPDATED!

This is an update to my previous postings regarding this topic.

First of all the most important information:

When will PMBOK® Guide Sixth Edition be released?

According to PMI, we can expect the following release dates:

  • Final Release is scheduled for the third quarter of 2017 (July-Sept 2017)

 

When will The PMP Exam change?

The PMP Exam is largely based on the content found in the PMBOK® Guide. The exam changeover from version 5 to 6 is scheduled as follows:

  • PMP Exam update to PMBOK 6 will happen in Q1 of 2018

 

What are the major changes that will happen?

 

Agile and other iterative practices

As some of us already heard there will be some new content to emphasize the importance and relevance of agile and other iterative practices.

Different from previous editions, the PMBOK®Guide –Sixth Edition will contain numerous references to adaptive and iterative practices, including agile. This decision was made in response to the requests of PMIs stakeholders. This content will include:

  • The practices often used in an adaptive environment in the front of each Knowledge Area section (Sections 4–13).
  • An appendix to The Standard for Project Management on agile and other iterative practices.

 

PMI Talent Triangle™

Will the new PMI Talent Triangle™ find its reflection in the upcoming PMBoK Guide Version? Of course!

The PMBOK®Guide –Sixth Edition will contain a new chapter on the role of the project manager which discusses the PMI Talent Triangle™ and the skill sets organizations demand that make project managers more competitive and relevant—technical project management, leadership, and strategic and business management.

 

Key Concepts

Many key concepts addressed in the first three chapters of the PMBOK® Guide are covered, in abbreviated form, in Section I of the Standard. Section II of the Standard contains a description of the project management processes, organized by Process Group, along with their key benefits, inputs and outputs.

 

Processes; Process Groups and Knowledge Areas

The Process Groups remain the same in the Sixth Edition, although two Knowledge Areas have new names:

Project Time Management is now Project Schedule Management, emphasizing the importance of scheduling in project management. This aligns with PMI’s Practice Standard for Scheduling.
And Project Human Resource Management is now Project Resource Management. We discuss both team resources and physical resources in the processes of this Knowledge Area.

There are three new processes in the Sixth Edition:


  • Manage Project Knowledge is part of the Executing Process Group and Project Integration Management knowledge area.
  • Implement Risk Responses is part of the Executing Process Group and Project Risk Management knowledge area.
  • Control Resources is part of the Monitoring and Controlling Process Group and Project Resource Management knowledge area.

Estimate Activity Resources is still part of the Planning Process Group, but it is associated with Project Resource Management processes instead of Project Schedule Management processes.

Since there will be one process be deleted - "Close Procurements" process has been removed. Its functionality has been consolidated into the "Close Project or Phase” Process - the total number of processes will count up from actually 47 to 49!

In addition, some processes have different names. For example, to align with research showing that project management is more about facilitating and managing than controlling, several processes are shifted from a Control function to a Monitor function. In other cases, the process name was aligned with the intent of the process. The chart below identifies the overall name changes.

 

PMBOK 5th Edition

PMBOK 6th Edition

Perform Quality Assurance

Manage Quality

Plan Human Resource Management

Plan Resource Management

Acquire Project Team Acquire Resources

Control Communications

Monitor Communications

Control Risks

Monitor Risks

Plan Stakeholder Management

Plan Stakeholder Engagement

Control Stakeholder Engagement

Monitor Stakeholder Engagement

 

The function of the Close Procurement process has now been captured within Control Procurements and Close Project or Phase. Research shows that few project managers have the authority to formally and legally close a contract. Project managers are responsible to determine that work is complete, records indexed and archived, and responsibilities transferred appropriately. Thus, they have now included work associated with Close Procurements within the aforementioned processes.

 

Project Management Plan Components and Project Documents

Please note the following changes to the project management plan components and project documents:

  • The components of the project management plan that are inputs to a process, or that are updated as outputs from a process, are not listed individually in the inputs or outputs. Rather, the project management plan is the input and project management plan updates is the output.
  • Beneath the input/output table, a list of potential project management plan components is identified. However, the components of the project management plan that will be inputs or updated depends on the needs of the project.
  • Project documents are listed as an input and project documents updates is listed as an output, as appropriate. Beneath the input/output table there is a list of potential project  documents that may be inputs, or may be updated as an output. The needs of the project will determine the actual project documents that should be inputs or updated as an output.

 

additional Changes (as known yet):

Chapters Re-alignment:

There will be chapters re-alignment in Chapters 1 to 3. The information in Chapter 1 to 3 will be combined into 2 chapters and a new Chapter 3 will be devoted to “The Role of the Project Manager” where many aspects of the Project Manager’s role will be mapped to the PMI Talent Triangle.

 

Process Tailoring:
Which means analyzing the project to determine how much emphasis to put on each process (based on the scope & size of the project).

 

“Ongoing” (continuously executing) vs. "Non-ongoing processes”:

There will be various notations throughout the new PMBOK differentiating between processes which are “Ongoing” (continuously executing) vs. "Non-ongoing processes.” This concept will be emphasized for the first time in PMBOK Guide Sixth Edition.

 

"Project Scope vs Product Scope":
concept will also be emphasized for the first time in PMBOK Guide Sixth Edition.

 

"Earned Value tool kit":
supported by the PMBOK will now include “Earned Schedule Management".

 

Communication:
There will be distinction between "Communication" (as in communicating between two people) and "Communications" (artifacts, such as published emails).

 

"Escalate Responses":
The new strategy, “Escalate Responses” provides for a PM escalating a risk to the appropriate party so that the risk is no longer his/her responsibility. Once escalated, the PM will now have the option of either:

a) Removing the risk from the project’s risk register if desired, or

b) Keeping it in the risk register, but classifying it as “Escalated/Assigned To.”

 

"Lessons Learned Register as new ITTO:
The new Lessons Learned Register is now part of the set of ITTOs. Project Managers will now be encouraged to update on a frequent basis (not just at the end of the project). Updates can be done at any time throughout the project, especially at the end of project phases.

 

New Appendix Information:

  • Summary of Key Concepts
  • Summary of Tailoring Considerations
  • Summary of Tools & Techniques
  • Adaptive & Iterative Approaches

 

This is what we know about the upcoming changes yet. There may be additional changes until the final version will be released.

We will inform you accordingly.

 


first published @ projectmanagement.plus

Posted on: October 26, 2016 09:19 AM | Permalink | Comments (12)

PMBOK® Guide 6th Edition will be released towards the end of 2017 - what will change?

Like i wrote in my previous article "What is the current edition of the PMBoK Guide and when will the new edition be released?" the public review of the exposure draft has just begun and it is still a long road until the final version will be released towards the end of 2017 respective the beginning of 2018 when the printed version  will become available.

Nevertheless it is interesting yet having a look on the upcoming changes the new version will bring us.

Of course this is high level and feels like a BETA version, but the major changes should be finalized already since public review has started, right?

Well, here we go:

Agile and other iterative practices

As some of us already heard there will be some new content to emphasisze the importance and relevance of agile and other iterative practices.

Different from previous editions, the PMBOK®Guide –Sixth Edition will contain numerous references to adaptive and iterative practices, including agile. This decision was made in response to the requests of PMIs stakeholders. This content will include:

  • The practices often used in an adaptive environment in the front of each Knowledge Area section (Sections 4–13).
  • An appendix toThe Standard for Project Management on agile and other iterative practices.

PMI Talent Triangle™

Will the new PMI Talent Triangle™ find its refelction in the upcoming PMBoK Guide Version? Of course!

The PMBOK®Guide –Sixth Edition will contain a new chapter on the role of the project manager which discusses the PMI Talent Triangle™ and the skill sets organizations demand that make project managers more competitive and relevant—technical project management, leadership, and strategic and business management.

Key Concepts

Many key concepts addressed in the first three chapters of the PMBOK® Guide are covered, in abbreviated form, in Section I of the Standard. Section II of the Standard contains a description of the project management processes, organized by Process Group, along with their key benefits, inputs and outputs.

Processes; Process Groups and Knowledge Areas

The Process Groups remain the same in the Sixth Edition, although two Knowledge Areas have new names:

Project Time Management is now Project Schedule Management, emphasizing the importance of scheduling in project management. This aligns with PMI’s Practice Standard for Scheduling.
And Project Human Resource Management is now Project Resource Management. We discuss both team resources and physical resources in the processes of this Knowledge Area.

There are three new processes in the Sixth Edition:


  • Manage Project Knowledge is part of the Executing Process Group and Project Integration Management knowledge area.
  • Implement Risk Responses is part of the Executing Process Group and Project Risk Management knowledge area.
  • Control Resources is part of the Monitoring and Controlling Process Group and Project Resource Management knowledge area.

Estimate Activity Resources is still part of the Planning Process Group, but it is associated with Project Resource Management processes instead of Project Schedule Management processes.

Since we do not know about deleting processes now, the overall number of processes seems to increase to 50!

In addition, some processes have different names. For example, to align with research showing that project management is more about facilitating and managing than controlling, we have shifted several processes from a Control function to a Monitor function. In other cases, we have aligned the process name with the intent of the process. The chart below identifies the overall name changes.

 

PMBOK 5th Edition

PMBOK 6th Edition

Perform Quality Assurance

Manage Quality

Plan Human Resource Management

Plan Resource Management

Control Communications

Monitor Communications

Control Risks

Monitor Risks

Plan Stakeholder Management

Plan Stakeholder Engagement

Control Stakeholder Engagement

Monitor Stakeholder Engagement

 

The function of the Close Procurement process has now been captured within Control Procurements and Close Project or Phase. Research shows that few project managers have the authority to formally and legally close a contract. Project managers are responsible to determine that work is complete, records indexed and archived, and responsibilities transferred appropriately. Thus, they have now included work associated with Close Procurements within the aforementioned processes.

Project Management Plan Components and Project Documents

Please note the following changes to the project management plan components and project documents:

  • The components of the project management plan that are inputs to a process, or that are updated as outputs from a process, are not listed individually in the inputs or outputs. Rather, the project management plan is the input and project management plan updates is the output.
  • Beneath the input/output table, a list of potential project management plan components is identified. However, the components of the project management plan that will be inputs or updated depends on the needs of the project.
  • Project documents are listed as an input and project documents updates is listed as an output, as appropriate. Beneath the input/output table there is a list of potential project  documents that may be inputs, or may be updated as an output. The needs of the project will determine the actual project documents that should be inputs or updated as an output.

 

This is what we know about the upcoming changes yet. There may be additional changes; as a result from the actual exposure draft review for instance.

We will update this article accordingly.


first published @ projectmanagement.plus

Posted on: March 15, 2016 06:35 AM | Permalink | Comments (58)

The first interactive PMP Exam Preparation - Checklist - great tool!

This is great news to all the PMP Exam aspirants out there. projectmanagement.plus is proud to announce the availability of its very first and unique interactive "Checklist":

 

The PMP Exam Preparation Checklist

On one hand an overview of what you need to think about when you are want to become a PMP; on the other hand a great tool which guides you through your PMP Exam Preparation!
 

People who are interested in PMP certification often ask the following questions at the beginning of their PMP journey: " What is this all about? Where should i just start? What do i need for it? How should i proceed? ..." and so on. Well, i guess every new PMP aspirant has such questions and we want to provide the answers!

But not only plain text (there is really just enough text to read and remember for you, trust me!), no, we add some value and developed a tool which not only delivers all the answers to those questions. No, you also get an instrument which you may use as a guideline, let's say as the "red line" through your exam preparations. And you may edit it to your very own preferences! But before we get in detail,

let's have a look on it (we can here only show a picture; explore the interactive version at www.projectmanagement.plus) :


How to use and work with the Checklist

Just klick on the little "Info" Button on the right side and there will open a sub-text field with additional informations and often links where you could find further informations or additional helpful sites or tools.

Follow the checklist from "head" to "bottom", hit the "checkmark" on the left side if you have fullfill this point and you will see the status bar "grow".

You can use the checklist included in this article as an overview and a starting point, you may print it or make a PDF.

But wouldn't it be more exciting if you could have and manage your very own Checklist?

Well, nothing easier than that! At pm.plus (and as far as we know only at pm.plus!) you could make a virtual copy of the checklist and than you will find a version of the original checklist under your "myChecklists" area in your profile. This version belongs only to you and it is fully editable to your very personal preferences!

Business Checklist ICVYou may add items, you may delete items and you even may create your very own, individual version! You are allowed to provide your own version to the community and you are even allowed to create your completely own checklists regarding whatever you want!

And the best: This is just the starting point! pm.plus will provide you many additional checklists in future, not only regarding PMP certification but also regarding all the project management aspects.

And like mentioned before: You may add your own input! You can make suggestions for changes at existing checklists or for additional checklists you want to see (i.e. in the comments to this article or directly in our discussion board at www.projectmanagement.plus ). Or you just create your own checklist, offer it to the community and earn your honors! The checklists have a rating function added ...

The opportunities seems endless ...

You may have a look under "resources/Checklists" to see what checklists we have to offer. You can make a copy there to your "myChecklists" area and than find the specific checklist in your profile under "myChecklists".

Just try it out (it is all completely free, but registration at pm.plus is needed) and let us know what you think and how we may improve this very new and unique feature for you!

Hope to see you soon at

www.projectmanagement.plus


Posted on: December 29, 2015 01:55 PM | Permalink | Comments (14)
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