Project Management

Disciplined Agile

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This blog contains details about various aspects of PMI's Disciplined Agile (DA) tool kit, including new and upcoming topics.

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Disciplined Agile Portfolio Management

Categories: scaling agile

We recently published an article describing how the Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD) framework is being extended to cover Portfolio Management activities.  The following diagram depicts the DAD goal diagram for Portfolio Management, and as you would expect your organizations has a range of options to choose from.  In this diagram we use the term endeavor to refer to a project, product, or experiment.

Disciplined Agile Portfolio Management

The article describes each one of these process factors – Identify Endeavors, Explore Potential Endeavors, and so on – in greater detail.  A future version of the article will describe the strategies/practices associated with each factor.  We have also included a high-level workflow diagram, see below, to overview from the point of view of the Portfolio Management process blade how it fits into the rest of the Disciplined Agile (DA) toolkit.

Disciplined Agile Portfolio Management

An interesting aspect of the flow diagram is that it shows the relationship of Portfolio Management to other IT Plan activities.  For example, Enterprise Architecture provides a Technology Roadmap and Product Management provides a Business Roadmap and an indication of stakeholder priorities – all critical information that are inputs into the efforts around prioritizing potential endeavors.  The point is that this diagram reflects workflow, not organizational design.  For example, in some companies there is no Product Management team, instead responsibility for the Product Management activities are spread out amongst several teams.  A common strategy is to have the Portfolio Management team responsible for understanding stakeholder priorities and the Enterprise Architecture team responsible for the business roadmap.  Another approach would be to have the Portfolio Management team subsume both of those activities.  A third approach would be to have three teams, one for each of Enterprise Architecture, Product Management, and Portfolio Management.  Different organizations will make different organizational design decisions, and of course these decisions will evolve over time.  As always, context counts.

I hope that you find the more detailed Portfolio Management article to be of interest.

Posted by Scott Ambler on: January 25, 2015 09:16 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
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