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About this Blog

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View Posts By:

Scott Ambler
Glen Little
Mark Lines
Valentin Mocanu
Daniel Gagnon
Michael Richardson
Joshua Barnes

Recent Posts

Failure Bow: Choosing Between Life Cycles Flowchart Update

Evolving Disciplined Agile: Guidelines of the DA Mindset

Evolving Disciplined Agile: Promises of the DA Mindset

Evolving Disciplined Agile: Principles of the DA Mindset

Evolving Disciplined Agile: The DA Mindset

Can You Spare a Few Moments to Fill in Our Short Agile Survey?

Categories: Surveys

Trust Data Not Lore

For those of you who are Star Trek fans you’ve likely been seeing ads for this t-shirt on your social media feeds.  It is an apt metaphor for the empirical approach that we take with Disciplined Agile – we regularly run studies to explore what is actually going on out there on agile teams, we gather data, as opposed to pouting some of the wishful thinking (spreading lore) that we often hear from consultants and vendors.

We are currently running an agile mini-survey of only 6 questions, so this will take you a few minutes at most to fill out, exploring some important issues about agile adoption within your organizations.  We hope that you choose to invest a few minutes of your valuable time to fill it out, and thank you in advance for doing so.

What Will We Do With the Results?

As you already know the surveys that we run are completely open – We share the source data (without identifying information), the questions as they were originally asked, and a Powerpoint deck summarizing our interesting findings after the survey has closed.  In fact, we have the results from dozens of previous studies posted at the IT Surveys page for you to take a look at.

We also write blogs discussing the results.  For example, for the 2016 Agile Scaling survey that we ran in November, we published several blogs:

Recently, we’ve created a new infographic summarizing the results of the study.  If you click on the thumbnail below it will take you to the page where you can download a high-resolution PDF of it.  This infographic is only available to members of the Disciplined Agile Consortium (DAC).

Agility at Scale 2016 Infographic

 

Where Can You Get the T-Shirt?

If you’re interested in the T-Shirt, it is a time limited offering on Teespring.

Posted by Scott Ambler on: May 11, 2017 08:36 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)

Should You Govern Agile Teams Via a Traditional Strategy?

Categories: Governance, Surveys

The quick answer is no, that’s an incredibly bad idea.

We ran a study in February 2017, the 2017 Agile Governance survey, to explore the issues around governance of agile teams. This study found that the majority of agile teams were in fact being governed in some way, that some agile teams were being governed in an agile or lightweight manner and some agile teams in a traditional manner.  See the blog Are Agile Teams Being Governed? for a summary of those results.

The study also examined the effect of governance on agile teams, exploring the perceived effect of the organization’s governance strategy on team productivity, on the quality delivered, on IT investment, and on team morale.  It also explored how heavy the governance strategy was perceived to be and how well it was focused on the delivery of business value. The following figure summarizes the results of these questions.

Governance Effectiveness with Agile Teams

Here are our conclusions given these results:

  1. Agile governance helps agile teams. There is a clear co-relation between an agile approach to governing agile teams and positive results such as improving productivity, increasing quality, spending your investment in IT wisely, and improved team morale. This is what we believe the goal to be, to help the people being governed to be more effective and successful.
  2. Traditional governance hinders agile teams.  There is a clear co-relation between traditional approaches to governing agile teams and reduced team productivity, reduced quality of output, wasting IT investment, and decreased team morale.  We believe that these results are the exact opposite of what you hope to achieve with your governance strategy.
  3. Agile teams should be governed in an agile manner.  This follows directly from the previous two conclusions.  It should come as no surprise that your governance strategy should be well-aligned with what it is being governed.
  4. Traditional governance strategies likely hinders traditional teams too.  We didn’t look into this issue directly, but our experience has been that traditional governance tends to be more of a hindrance than a help to traditional teams as well.

When we work with organizations to help them to adopt agile ways of working, we often find that they are running into several common challenges when it comes to IT governance:

  1. They have both agile teams and traditional software teams.  This is because it’s a multi-modal world: You will have some teams taking a traditional approach, some an agile approach, some take a lean approach, and some are even skilled enough for continuous delivery.  Each team will follow the lifecycle that makes the most sense for them, and as a result each team should be governed by the approach that best suits the way that they are working.  To do anything different would be to hinder the teams, and that isn’t what good governance should be about.
  2. There is a desire for a single approach to governing software teams. This makes sense on the surface because it would simplify your overall governance strategy, thereby making things easier for the people doing the governing.  But, as we’ve learned, this results in negative effects in practice.  Your governance strategy must be flexible enough to support the range of teams being governed.
  3. The governance team is struggling to understand agile.  Your executives and middle management need education and coaching in agile and lean just like the people on your software team do.  It is naive to expect your governance people to devise a governance strategy for agile when they don’t really understand the implications of agile to begin with.

For agile to succeed in your organization the way that you approach IT must evolve to enable and support it, and this includes your governance strategy.  Reach out to us if you would like some help in addressing this important issue.

Related Reading

 

Posted by Scott Ambler on: April 08, 2017 07:11 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)

Are Agile Teams Being Governed?

Categories: Governance, Surveys

For the major of teams the answer is yes.  We ran a survey in February 2017, the 2017 Agile Governance survey, to explore the issues around governance of agile teams.  As you can see in the following diagram, 78% of respondents indicated that yes, their agile teams were in fact being governed in some manner.

Agile governance rates

We also asked people about the approach to governing agile teams that their organization followed.  As you can see in the following diagram, a bit more than a third of respondents indicated that the governance strategy was lightweight or agile in nature.  Roughly the same indicated that their agile teams had a more traditional approach to governance applied to them, and one quarter said their governance approach was neither helping nor hindering their teams.

How are agile teams being governed?

Governance tends to be a swear word for many agilists and they will tell you that governance is nothing than useless bureaucracy.  Sadly in many organizations this seems to be the case.    In the next blog in this series we will compare the effectiveness of agile and traditional strategies for governing agile teams.

Related Reading

Posted by Scott Ambler on: April 04, 2017 07:32 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)

How "Whole" Are Agile Teams in Practice?

We are often told that agile teams should be whole, that they should have sufficient people, funding, and skills to fulfill their mission.  The idea is that this reduces the dependencies that your team has on others, enabling them to make decisions and to collaborate more effectively.  But, is this actually happening in practice?  Are agile teams truly whole, or do they still need to collaborate with other teams (hopefully productively) to get the job done?  Being strong believers in empiricism over rhetoric we decided to look into this issue.

In November of 2016 we ran the 2016 Agility at Scale survey.  It was targeted at people who were currently working on agile teams, or who had recently worked on agile teams, and we asked them straightforward questions around the size of the team, how distributed it was, what complexities they faced, an so on.  The following infographic summarizes the findings from the question that explored whether agile delivery teams need to work with external teams or groups to get their work done – in other words, are agile teams truly whole or do they rely on others?  As you can see, 96% of respondents indicated that in practice their team had to work with one or more other teams, leading to the conclusion that very few agile teams appear to be truly whole.

Agile Teams Need to be Enterprise Aware

One of the fundamental principles underlying the Disciplined Agile (DA) toolkit is that disciplined agilists should be enterprise aware – they should recognize that they need to collaborate with others outside of their team, that they should work towards a common organizational vision, and that they should strive to do what is best for the organization and not just what is convenient for them.  Given that agile teams are collaborating with others in practice, it is clear that this philosophy of being enterprise aware is important.

The following diagram presents the results from the survey question in greater detail.  You can obtain the source data, a copy of the original questions, and a slide deck key diagrams at the 2016 Agility at Scale survey page.

Enterprise Awareness

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Posted by Scott Ambler on: February 09, 2017 12:37 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)

How Geographically Distributed Are Agile Teams in Practice?

Many people, particularly those new to agile, will tell you that agile teams must be small and co-located.  That is certainly a smart way of organizing a team, but is isn’t required.  In fact agile teams are more likely to be geographically distributed in some way than they are to be co-located.  In practice, not theory.

In November of 2016 we ran the 2016 Agility at Scale survey.  It was targeted at people who were currently working on agile teams, or who had recently worked on agile teams, and we asked them straightforward questions around the size of the team, how distributed it was, what complexities they faced, an so on.  The following graph summarizes the responses around geographic distribution.

Geographic distribution and agile teams

The survey found that less than one-third of agile teams are near-located, where all of the IT members are either co-located or at least in a shared open space.  Previous studies have found that this number drops to one-in-ten teams being near located when you also include primary stakeholders.

Don’t let anyone tell you that you can’t do agile with a geographically distributed team because others are clearly doing so in practice.  Yes, geographically distributed agile is different than near-located agile, which is one of the reasons why you need to take a pragmatic, context-sensitive approach to agile solution delivery.  The Disciplined Agile (DA) toolkit provides the foundation from which to scale your approach to solution delivery to address a range of scaling factors, including geographic distribution.  In fact, you may find our article around geographically distributed agile teams to be an interesting read.

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Posted by Scott Ambler on: February 06, 2017 09:20 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
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