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Topics: Agile, Scrum
What does Agile mean?
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I will ask again since when I originally asked it during the talent and tech expo and it got wiped off the board real quick. (or no one wanted to answer it).


I have seen and been involved in, a couple of debates on what exactly Agile means. I rather enjoy those debates and learning what others think about it.

To me, Agile is a generic umbrella term for frameworks and methods that meet a certain set of guiding principles and practices.

What Does Agile Mean?
What is/should be included within a detailed Agile definition (guiding principles/practices)?
Has the hype around Agile caused the definition to warp some?
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That's just it Joshua, with so many definitions and terminology floating around, people will never agree on exactly what it is. But then they don't need to. Let's take "project management" for example. It sounds straightforward as if most practitioners would agree on what it is. But the definition would vary in my view more than Agile. Having said that, there are some keywords that are associated with certain ideas, principles, frameworks etc. It may be beneficial to consider thee keywords, rather than try and construct a sentence using these them along with other nouns, verbs and adjectives in a million combinations. Keywords such as flexibility, adaptation, transparency, inspection, iterative deliverables, welcoming change etc.
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1 reply by Joshua Render
Jun 16, 2018 8:34 AM
Joshua Render
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I do find defining when something is a project to be difficult sometimes. Usually shorter efforts that are perhaps not often or never repeated, but their duration of time they take may not be that long, but it is longer than a few days.
This mostly becomes an issue of, should I fill out the formal project paperwork and budgeting requests for this and issue formal updates through the usual channels, or should I just shove it through and get it done.
I have had small script requests come through that we expect to only take a couple of days, those we shove through - most of the time I just write them myself and be done with it. When the work expectation meets a couple of weeks we tend to debate a bit on whether it meets the definition of a "project" within the organization.
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Hold on, let me grab my popcorn ....
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Could turn out into an interesting debate...
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I guess I should keep an eye here
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Where is Sergio?
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1 reply by Joshua Render
Jun 16, 2018 8:18 AM
Joshua Render
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I was sure he would show up with this question.
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Jun 16, 2018 6:28 AM
Replying to Drake Settsu
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Where is Sergio?
I was sure he would show up with this question.
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Jun 15, 2018 6:53 PM
Replying to Sante Vergini
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That's just it Joshua, with so many definitions and terminology floating around, people will never agree on exactly what it is. But then they don't need to. Let's take "project management" for example. It sounds straightforward as if most practitioners would agree on what it is. But the definition would vary in my view more than Agile. Having said that, there are some keywords that are associated with certain ideas, principles, frameworks etc. It may be beneficial to consider thee keywords, rather than try and construct a sentence using these them along with other nouns, verbs and adjectives in a million combinations. Keywords such as flexibility, adaptation, transparency, inspection, iterative deliverables, welcoming change etc.
I do find defining when something is a project to be difficult sometimes. Usually shorter efforts that are perhaps not often or never repeated, but their duration of time they take may not be that long, but it is longer than a few days.
This mostly becomes an issue of, should I fill out the formal project paperwork and budgeting requests for this and issue formal updates through the usual channels, or should I just shove it through and get it done.
I have had small script requests come through that we expect to only take a couple of days, those we shove through - most of the time I just write them myself and be done with it. When the work expectation meets a couple of weeks we tend to debate a bit on whether it meets the definition of a "project" within the organization.
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1 reply by Dinah Young
Jun 16, 2018 11:02 AM
Dinah Young
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As the PMO we set a definition for what a project is for our company. We had been debating it for years. So we decided that any thing that took at least 2 weeks or cost more than $5000 was a project.
It may be different for others but this what worked for us.
Now Agile is completely different. We have not defined it yet because we have not done much in the past. But I do think it is something that your company needs to set for yourselves using the industry knowledge available.
Network:2355



Jun 16, 2018 8:34 AM
Replying to Joshua Render
...
I do find defining when something is a project to be difficult sometimes. Usually shorter efforts that are perhaps not often or never repeated, but their duration of time they take may not be that long, but it is longer than a few days.
This mostly becomes an issue of, should I fill out the formal project paperwork and budgeting requests for this and issue formal updates through the usual channels, or should I just shove it through and get it done.
I have had small script requests come through that we expect to only take a couple of days, those we shove through - most of the time I just write them myself and be done with it. When the work expectation meets a couple of weeks we tend to debate a bit on whether it meets the definition of a "project" within the organization.
As the PMO we set a definition for what a project is for our company. We had been debating it for years. So we decided that any thing that took at least 2 weeks or cost more than $5000 was a project.
It may be different for others but this what worked for us.
Now Agile is completely different. We have not defined it yet because we have not done much in the past. But I do think it is something that your company needs to set for yourselves using the industry knowledge available.
Network:152



Nice question!!! But where can I find this definition?? In PMBOK version 6???
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1 reply by Joshua Render
Jun 18, 2018 1:49 PM
Joshua Render
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With the release of the PMBO v. 6, they released another book, The Agile Practice Guide. It is almost 200 pages and may provide the answers you seek.
Network:1601



Sorry for joining late to the party, but here I am (hehehehe). Agile was "formaly" born in 1990 inside the USA DoD NSF/Agility Forum which took place inside the Leihigh University trying to find an alternative to Lean (because of that Lean and Agile are not the same). It was moved by one seminal article published in middle 1980 in the USA named "Agile Manufacturing". Time after people that have methods to create software products and those methods were created taken Lean model they created the Manifesto (the word "software" is inside the name becasue a reason). The definitions created into the Forum are Agile:A way of thought and behave whose focus is the increase of value for the client and the quality", agility: "Be able respond to a wide variety of unexpected external surprises and create external surprises.Being agile will assist businesses who face unpredictable circumstances"
This is a short article published by the PMI:
"Perfectly Positioned", http://www.pmnetwork-digital.com/pmnetwork/april_2016?pg=73#pg73
"Perfectatmente Posicionado",http://www.pmnetwork-spanish.com/pmnetwork...016?pg=68#pg68.
Here some articles that I think could help to understand that Agile is not a synonim of software and in this case take the whole potential of Agile:
https://steveblank.com/2016/11/10/how-the-...vation-culture/
https://hbr.org/1986/01/the-new-new-product-development-game
https://hbr.org/2016/04/the-secret-history-of-agile-innovation
https://www.scruminc.com/wp-content/upload...-with-Agile.pdf
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2 replies by Anish Abraham and Joshua Render
Jun 18, 2018 1:53 PM
Joshua Render
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Very good description. I think we were missing you a bit.

So here is a question for you, what are the minimum criteria that must be met in order to be called Agile?

I would think at a minimum it must be iterative and incremental, which by default gives you the ability to make changes and work on quality.

I think as it has evolved, more things tend to be included on what constitutes Agile, but iterative and incremental was at least where it started. (I would add at least a couple more things to the list now as it has evolved some)
Jun 19, 2018 5:44 PM
Anish Abraham
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Thanks for sharing the info, Sergio
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