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Topics: Communications Management, Resource Management, Strategy
Do you trust your remote or distributed workers/colleagues?
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For example, do you trust them working from home as much as when they were in the office all day?
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Not at all. However, I do expect them to have greater net productivity at home, since they don't have to deal with the many distractions found in my workplace. As long as my colleagues are producing high-quality deliverables at the expected times and are accessible during certain hours, they are free to utilize their time at home however they please.
In April I started working remotely four out of five days per week, and I've seen a significant increase in the amount of professional and personal work I get done.
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Sante, good question I will reverse it first and point the same question to our self when we have been asked to work from home what was our behavior other than working in pajamas, did we do the due diligence and perform same efforts? of course we did more than the office now how about the team, it is dependent on the person and the nature of work expected to perform is that work quantifiable, can we measure at the end of the day the results were expected, so the end result is what important either from home or office. some people work harder when they know that they have watched some feel reluctant, it is a mix situation it is the consciousness where drive the honesty at work whether at office or at home nowadays some people waste time even at office by doing non value added activities and the examples for that are plenty.
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Do you think our managers trust us when we work from home? :)

Anyway, there is trust until its proven there shouldn't be. We're all professionals and adults (?)
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I'll echo Andrew's statement - trust those who work with us until they give us reason not to.

I'd rather have someone working from home who produces quality results in half the time and spends the remaining half the time doing home chores then someone that occupies a desk in the office but accomplishes less...

Our focus needs to be on maximizing value not utilization.

Kiron
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1 reply by Sante Vergini
Jul 03, 2018 4:59 AM
Sante Vergini
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Overseas I saw productivity and performance increase when workers were remote, and still managers did not trust remote employees as much as when they were in the office. It's all about a loss of control, or the perception of same.
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I concur with Andrew here.
As long as they are meeting the deadlines, I don't have an issue working from home.
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The measure of results is the output of effort. Some people can handle working from home, others cannot.
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I saw a recent stat that when workers go remote, trust (from managers) falls off by 83%.
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Yes, as long as there are clear goals, deliverable, schedules and a established communication methodology- It does work. I really do not care how the person manages his/her time as long as the quality and timeline is not compromised. However it also depends on the person too, for some it works well and for others the productivity goes down.
But your question was about trust - Andrew answered it better than I can answer it.
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My experience from the BPO industry where a lot of employees work from home, is that managers do not trust remote employees unfortunately.
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Jul 02, 2018 10:46 AM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
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I'll echo Andrew's statement - trust those who work with us until they give us reason not to.

I'd rather have someone working from home who produces quality results in half the time and spends the remaining half the time doing home chores then someone that occupies a desk in the office but accomplishes less...

Our focus needs to be on maximizing value not utilization.

Kiron
Overseas I saw productivity and performance increase when workers were remote, and still managers did not trust remote employees as much as when they were in the office. It's all about a loss of control, or the perception of same.
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1 reply by Andrew Craig
Jul 03, 2018 6:43 AM
Andrew Craig
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When office-bound the impression is working an 8-hour shift. When home-bound (remote) there is more of a tendency to 'multi-task', i.e. taking the dog for a walk, going for a run during lunch.

(But what about all those smoke breaks!)

The reality is that even in the office, you're getting 5-6 hours of solid work a day, regardless of the location (remote or office)

The perception of what it means to work remote is the problem here. Take Eric's comment above - no trust at all. That is [the] a problem. So what do we measure, time or quality?

Unfortunately, many do take advantage of an organization's trust. Some org's are tracking login location and times. Maybe there should be a mandate for video calls. Honestly, heck, most don't even pay attention in meetings when sitting in person in the office - typing, texting, surfing, sleeping, whatever.

Now, what I like about co-location are the relationships that come from personal and ad-hoc conversations, design discussions, what-if's, etc. There is just something organic about co-location and something I believe that no matter how great our remote supported tools are, it is just not the same.
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