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Topics: Agile, Change Management, Resource Management
Scrum for publishing (remote work)
Network:1171



Has anyone ever used scrum for publishing? Is it possible with the freelance kinda environment used for the steps in publishing a book or a document?

Thank you!
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Network:121933



If I understand you correctly then yes, you can in a way by releasing MVP increment for feedback from the end users or reader.
Network:1504



Guilherme -

I'm not sure that I'd apply a timeboxed approach to something which involves a high degree of creativity and hence might not enable decomposition of work down to work items which can cleanly fit within sprints. Kanban might fit better...

Kiron
...
1 reply by Guilherme Caloba
Sep 24, 2018 7:46 PM
Guilherme Caloba
...
Thank you, Kiron. My idea is that if you are writing a technical book (about Project management, why not?) you have to approve the concept with the Publisher and then you have some time to actually do the work. During this time you have no pressure (other than your own) to do it on a schedule. And even after that, what generally happens (for me) is that you deliver the contents all at once, and the following tasks are done in a waterfall. I think that by doing it in parallel and maybe on a peer reviewed format, you could minimize the time to Market and ensure a better Project, overall. Please tell me more about how you'd use Kanban here...
Network:1171



Sep 24, 2018 6:22 PM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Guilherme -

I'm not sure that I'd apply a timeboxed approach to something which involves a high degree of creativity and hence might not enable decomposition of work down to work items which can cleanly fit within sprints. Kanban might fit better...

Kiron
Thank you, Kiron. My idea is that if you are writing a technical book (about Project management, why not?) you have to approve the concept with the Publisher and then you have some time to actually do the work. During this time you have no pressure (other than your own) to do it on a schedule. And even after that, what generally happens (for me) is that you deliver the contents all at once, and the following tasks are done in a waterfall. I think that by doing it in parallel and maybe on a peer reviewed format, you could minimize the time to Market and ensure a better Project, overall. Please tell me more about how you'd use Kanban here...
...
1 reply by Kiron Bondale
Sep 25, 2018 7:34 AM
Kiron Bondale
...
I'd prefer a non-timeboxed approach unless you have the content mostly nailed down otherwise you are artificially decomposing work to force it into a sprint and will what's completed actually be of value? There could also be a benefit in keeping an eye on the volume of concurrent work so Kanban's WIP limits would be helpful and as there are likely different classes of work items the ability to identify and address those which need to be expedited is also good.
Network:1604



Hi Guilherme, I think you definitely can apply scrum for elaborating a document to publish. You can look at the document as being "software" which it is. Remember though that in principle, scrum applies to a team of contributors, so it will work better if you have several contributors and if you peer review or even peer work. And yes, proceeding with iterations should ensure a better quality (in terms of satisfying your customer), provided he is also involved in the review process and willing to participate regularly (which may be a sticking point). I have participated to a workshop whose goal was to update a corporate process , where we did just that in very quick iterations 2 to 3 hours (not sure how long these were), because the overall time frame was short. The idea was that the process documentation was software, and that we could develop/update it , in a similar way yo software. This worked quite well, and we even had a scrum of scrum because the number of participants was 25 to 30... So if you have several contributors to your publishing project, you can consider Scrum. Good luck!
Network:15952



It's good for research, which is linked to publishing.
Network:2264



Sante, didn't you have a blog entry of such?

For work output, sure, divide into buckets. For feedback loops, again, absolutely. Why not. Seems like we are speaking of an underlying divide and conquer, except the divide is the target, not the actor.
Network:1504



Sep 24, 2018 7:46 PM
Replying to Guilherme Caloba
...
Thank you, Kiron. My idea is that if you are writing a technical book (about Project management, why not?) you have to approve the concept with the Publisher and then you have some time to actually do the work. During this time you have no pressure (other than your own) to do it on a schedule. And even after that, what generally happens (for me) is that you deliver the contents all at once, and the following tasks are done in a waterfall. I think that by doing it in parallel and maybe on a peer reviewed format, you could minimize the time to Market and ensure a better Project, overall. Please tell me more about how you'd use Kanban here...
I'd prefer a non-timeboxed approach unless you have the content mostly nailed down otherwise you are artificially decomposing work to force it into a sprint and will what's completed actually be of value? There could also be a benefit in keeping an eye on the volume of concurrent work so Kanban's WIP limits would be helpful and as there are likely different classes of work items the ability to identify and address those which need to be expedited is also good.
Network:1171



Thank you so much for your contributions. I have a follow-up question: do you know of a publisher or a research institution using Scrum (or Kanban, for that matter) to speed up "time-to-market"? And if so, is there any papers or a description of such?

Regards.

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