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Topics: Career Development, Leadership, Strategy
Starting new PM project: key thing(s) to remember / consider?
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When starting a new PM project: what is 1 (are some) most important things to remember (or consider)?
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1) Triple constrain Scope,Budget,Time
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1 reply by Joanna Couto
Oct 07, 2018 9:28 PM
Joanna Couto
...
Hi Arshad, Thanks for your suggestion. Yes, these are 3 very key criteria. I appreciate your help. Have a nice day
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Oct 07, 2018 9:24 PM
Replying to Arshad Abdullah
...
1) Triple constrain Scope,Budget,Time
Hi Arshad, Thanks for your suggestion. Yes, these are 3 very key criteria. I appreciate your help. Have a nice day
Network:371



1. Go into your project with a positive and confident attitude. I know, that sounds really lame but by the time an initiative turns into a project, it usually comes with a great deal of pre-appended baggage. Make sure that you address the pre-appended baggage head on during the project initiation process. Solve for x. Move on.

2. If you don't know your project team members, take time to get to know them (if possible) , before the actual work begins, Creating a bond with your entire team (and individual team members) will get you all through the rough times. Always have your team members backs no matter what.

3. You attract more bees with honey. Translation - don't just bring issues to the attention of stakeholders, come prepared with ways to solve and/or provide various and alternative paths to pursue when you anticipate being between a rock and a hard place.. More executive level types are more about forward thinking and less about circling the drain on what's wrong, why it's wrong, and who's to blame.

4.. Lessons learned - absolutely do not wait until the end of a project to do this. I try to have a debrief with my project team weekly - 30 minutes tops - because mistakes hava a tendency to repeat themselves. Better to make the change in behavior or in process so that you can really make an impact on the here and now.
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2 replies by Anton Oosthuizen and Joanna Couto
Oct 07, 2018 10:36 PM
Joanna Couto
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Hi Kristina, Thanks so much for all your great ideas. I will definitely put them into practice... confidently & positively! Have a great day.
Oct 08, 2018 2:47 AM
Anton Oosthuizen
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I really like points 3 & 4. It is important to be transparent and raise issues when they happen but just as important, if not more, to do it with a solution or mitigating action. And too many times have I seen lessons learned diligently documented only to go into the archives for those same mistakes to be repeated because we did not implement it immediately. Great advice.
Network:854



Oct 07, 2018 10:24 PM
Replying to Kristina Frazier-Henry
...
1. Go into your project with a positive and confident attitude. I know, that sounds really lame but by the time an initiative turns into a project, it usually comes with a great deal of pre-appended baggage. Make sure that you address the pre-appended baggage head on during the project initiation process. Solve for x. Move on.

2. If you don't know your project team members, take time to get to know them (if possible) , before the actual work begins, Creating a bond with your entire team (and individual team members) will get you all through the rough times. Always have your team members backs no matter what.

3. You attract more bees with honey. Translation - don't just bring issues to the attention of stakeholders, come prepared with ways to solve and/or provide various and alternative paths to pursue when you anticipate being between a rock and a hard place.. More executive level types are more about forward thinking and less about circling the drain on what's wrong, why it's wrong, and who's to blame.

4.. Lessons learned - absolutely do not wait until the end of a project to do this. I try to have a debrief with my project team weekly - 30 minutes tops - because mistakes hava a tendency to repeat themselves. Better to make the change in behavior or in process so that you can really make an impact on the here and now.
Hi Kristina, Thanks so much for all your great ideas. I will definitely put them into practice... confidently & positively! Have a great day.
Network:929



Add Value.
Never be afraid to say NO.
Know your limitations.
Never be afraid to admit that you don't know.

Oh forgot - always wear sunscreen ;)
Network:929



Oct 07, 2018 10:24 PM
Replying to Kristina Frazier-Henry
...
1. Go into your project with a positive and confident attitude. I know, that sounds really lame but by the time an initiative turns into a project, it usually comes with a great deal of pre-appended baggage. Make sure that you address the pre-appended baggage head on during the project initiation process. Solve for x. Move on.

2. If you don't know your project team members, take time to get to know them (if possible) , before the actual work begins, Creating a bond with your entire team (and individual team members) will get you all through the rough times. Always have your team members backs no matter what.

3. You attract more bees with honey. Translation - don't just bring issues to the attention of stakeholders, come prepared with ways to solve and/or provide various and alternative paths to pursue when you anticipate being between a rock and a hard place.. More executive level types are more about forward thinking and less about circling the drain on what's wrong, why it's wrong, and who's to blame.

4.. Lessons learned - absolutely do not wait until the end of a project to do this. I try to have a debrief with my project team weekly - 30 minutes tops - because mistakes hava a tendency to repeat themselves. Better to make the change in behavior or in process so that you can really make an impact on the here and now.
I really like points 3 & 4. It is important to be transparent and raise issues when they happen but just as important, if not more, to do it with a solution or mitigating action. And too many times have I seen lessons learned diligently documented only to go into the archives for those same mistakes to be repeated because we did not implement it immediately. Great advice.
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Develop the project charter in presence of experts and also focus on one on one meetings with your stakeholders and team member as well for generate and collect the requirements.
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Managing stakeholders in the external and internal environments, ensuring they understand and respect each other's diverse interests and perspectives in working towards common project objectives.
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First thing is to stay clear on this: from product/service/result definition (product scope) you will create project definitions (project scope). Business Analyst is accountable for product/service/result definitions then project manager is not. Between the project scope something is critical to define and agreed: project objectives which are the meassure of project success. That is the first thing to define. Take a close look because some people assign product success to project success and that is wrong. For example, things like "with this project we will increase the market share by 5%" is wroing. You will increase the market share with the product/result/service the project will create not with the project itself.
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A little bit of risk management saves a lot of fan cleaning...
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