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Topics: Estimating, Governance, Information Technology, PMO, Using PMI Standards, Work Breakdown Structures (WBS)
How to manage Project Deliverables
Hello Experts!

When it comes to project deliverables How do you handle these or what have you seen happen during a project?

-Will project deliverables usually go along with a milestone, meaning in order to close a milestone, project deliverables are due?
Or
-Will project deliverables are usually given before the closure of the project (as a task)
Or
-Project deliverables are due whenever the client or stakeholders request them?

IF so what is usually the standard or what do you usually do?

Thank you experts for your valuable input
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It depends on the project life cycle you use and the approach you use. For example, if you use an incremental-iterative life cycle with an Agile based approach. In my personal case in today work place we have a governance process where deliverables are the evidence about a milestone inside the governance process has been completed and that governance process is a layer that is used no matter the life cycle and approch we use.On the other side, because our value framework is client oriented for us a deliverable is a evidence that we are "fulfilling the contract" with our clients.
Sergio,

Thanks for your time and your response. So it seems that every milestone has a deliverable? or should have a deliverable? or "could have a deliverable", hence rather than have a separate task just specific for a project deliverable, a milestone for framework purposes could contain one or more deliverables. Does this sounds about right? Thanks again for your time.
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1 reply by Sergio Luis Conte
Oct 25, 2018 7:05 AM
Sergio Luis Conte
...
@Kiron statement is something we take into account. For us, we tied milestones to deliverable in the sense that a milestone is achieved when a deliverable is done (for us done it does mean accepted too). For us, deliverable could be a document, one page of paper, hardware setted up and running, a piece of code, etc. Something that deliver value to our clients because is something they are expecting to get.
Cesar -

As Sergio indicates, it is really project-specific and it depends on the nature of the deliverables. Documentation byproduct type deliverables are usually provided over the full life of the project without being tied to specific milestones or the closure of the project, whereas those deliverables which represent "real" value to our customers would likely be tied to milestones or the final acceptance of the project.

Kiron
Kiron,

Sir, I hope all is well, I do agree with both of you gentleman's approach and process. While I had the same hunch as both of you, I wanted the expert opinion of our members. Thanks for both of your time!
Sergio, some additional thoughts
- not every milestone needs to be attached to a deliverable, e.g. if you receive something from outside your project and need it at a specific date, this would be a milestone too
- deliverables need not be delivered to the customer, e.g. if you build a house and need a crane for this, a crane installation would be a project deliverable but not put forward to the customer
- each work package in the WBS should have one or more deliverables, which you can verify and hene say the work package was 'delivered'
- what you define as milestone is up to the needs of the project stakeholders, as milestones are significant events in a project
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1 reply by Sergio Luis Conte
Oct 25, 2018 1:52 PM
Sergio Luis Conte
...
I agree with you in general. Just let me some comment because I am here to learn from all comments. As I mentioned before, for us lot of things could be deliverables but it depends of our process. The only thing we always have on focus is value delivering for our client and for us client is "the next into the process chain". We (and I fully agree with that because I am in charge of defining this type of things) do not make clasifications like "external" or "internal" generally speaking.
Oct 25, 2018 6:09 AM
Replying to Cesar Fiestas
...
Sergio,

Thanks for your time and your response. So it seems that every milestone has a deliverable? or should have a deliverable? or "could have a deliverable", hence rather than have a separate task just specific for a project deliverable, a milestone for framework purposes could contain one or more deliverables. Does this sounds about right? Thanks again for your time.
@Kiron statement is something we take into account. For us, we tied milestones to deliverable in the sense that a milestone is achieved when a deliverable is done (for us done it does mean accepted too). For us, deliverable could be a document, one page of paper, hardware setted up and running, a piece of code, etc. Something that deliver value to our clients because is something they are expecting to get.
Oct 25, 2018 6:49 AM
Replying to Thomas Walenta
...
Sergio, some additional thoughts
- not every milestone needs to be attached to a deliverable, e.g. if you receive something from outside your project and need it at a specific date, this would be a milestone too
- deliverables need not be delivered to the customer, e.g. if you build a house and need a crane for this, a crane installation would be a project deliverable but not put forward to the customer
- each work package in the WBS should have one or more deliverables, which you can verify and hene say the work package was 'delivered'
- what you define as milestone is up to the needs of the project stakeholders, as milestones are significant events in a project
I agree with you in general. Just let me some comment because I am here to learn from all comments. As I mentioned before, for us lot of things could be deliverables but it depends of our process. The only thing we always have on focus is value delivering for our client and for us client is "the next into the process chain". We (and I fully agree with that because I am in charge of defining this type of things) do not make clasifications like "external" or "internal" generally speaking.
"Deliverables" is a very broad, generic term. They come in many different types, and at different levels of a project. Example: I might have test results as a deliverable required to certify a product. Certification might be one of many deliverables before I can deliver the product itself. A project might contain many products, or different lifecycle phases such as development, and product support, requiring a different set of deliverables. This is where the project manager must use their best judgement to decide the best way to manage them. There is no one size fits all solution.

Milestones may or may not be tied to deliverables. They are schedule features meant to represent something important but are really an event with zero duration, and zero or many activities which produce deliverables may be tied to a milestone. Examples of milestones that may not include discrete deliverables are decision gates, and project phase transitions like moving from development to production. These are very important, occur at a specific point in time, and there would be information exchanged, meetings held and so forth, but there may not be formal deliverables either leading to these milestones, or generated as a result.
Hello Experts.

What about the timing or cost of a project deliverable, should the project deliverable (time to complete or to deliver and the cost involved) be discussed during the charter? or the time/cost of the project deliverable should have been added to the cost before the project starts or even before the charter discussion? What is the norm?

Thanks experts!
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1 reply by Sergio Luis Conte
Oct 27, 2018 6:39 AM
Sergio Luis Conte
...
The cost is calculated on activities, not on the deliverable itself.
Oct 27, 2018 5:59 AM
Replying to Cesar Fiestas
...
Hello Experts.

What about the timing or cost of a project deliverable, should the project deliverable (time to complete or to deliver and the cost involved) be discussed during the charter? or the time/cost of the project deliverable should have been added to the cost before the project starts or even before the charter discussion? What is the norm?

Thanks experts!
The cost is calculated on activities, not on the deliverable itself.
...
1 reply by Cesar Fiestas
Oct 27, 2018 6:42 AM
Cesar Fiestas
...
Sergio,

Thanks for your time, although is the cost estimated before the charter or after the charter (best practice that is)
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