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Topics: Agile, Organizational Project Management, Scrum
Agile PM framework/Methodology
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Anyone using an Agile methodology/framework developed for generic Project Management?
I am looking for a methodology/framework that is not software oriented and has a budget management component.
I know most of the 'famous' Agile frameworks (XP, Scrum, LeSS, SAFe, Kanban...), please read the requirements:
1) Not Software Development oriented
2) Can manage financials
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Stelian -

The scaled framework used by my current client (a bank) which was developed incorporating ideas from a few different standard scaled frameworks is being used for both technology and non-technology projects.

With very slight adaptation, Scrum can be applied to such situations - rather than a Development Team, it might just be a Team, and sprint duration may need to be adjusted if it is impossible to split work items down to a level where they meet INVEST criteria but will still fit within a sprint.

I've taught a course at one of our nearby universities on this very topic and it is just a question of adaptation of specific practices whereas the values & principles can be applied more or less "as is".

Kiron
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2 replies by Stelian ROMAN
Dec 18, 2018 4:03 PM
Stelian ROMAN
...
Thank you Kiron. Any framework can be made 'generic' by removing the word 'development'. It's the same with making planned frameworks 'Agile' by adding the prefix to their roles. Agile PM, Agile Tester, Agile BA etc. Most of the Agile practices are far older than AM but they were used inside planned frameworks.
I agree that any framework can be adapted to non software development domains but originally most of them were developed by software developers for software development.
Dec 18, 2018 4:12 PM
Stelian ROMAN
...
The second point was that I am looking for a framework that has a financial management component....
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Hi Stelian,

Scrum is not just for Software Development, it is implemented for projects that require fast project impact and results. I guess it can be applied as you require. About the budget management, I guess in this case works better traditional management and track.
...
1 reply by Stelian ROMAN
Dec 18, 2018 4:11 PM
Stelian ROMAN
...
Jesus. A project is defined by time, budget and scope. Have a look at the Scrum Guide and try to identify those 3 attributes. It's enough to read the first sentence "Scrum is a framework for developing, delivering, and sustaining complex products" to understand that Scrum is not a Project Management framework.
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On top of Kiron's comment: Please check out DSDM. DSDM does address agile project management framework topics.
...
1 reply by Stelian ROMAN
Dec 18, 2018 4:07 PM
Stelian ROMAN
...
Thank you Peter. I don't consider DSDM an Agile framework. I'm happy to have a chat in private. dan.s.roman@gmail.com
Network:852



Dec 18, 2018 7:51 AM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Stelian -

The scaled framework used by my current client (a bank) which was developed incorporating ideas from a few different standard scaled frameworks is being used for both technology and non-technology projects.

With very slight adaptation, Scrum can be applied to such situations - rather than a Development Team, it might just be a Team, and sprint duration may need to be adjusted if it is impossible to split work items down to a level where they meet INVEST criteria but will still fit within a sprint.

I've taught a course at one of our nearby universities on this very topic and it is just a question of adaptation of specific practices whereas the values & principles can be applied more or less "as is".

Kiron
Thank you Kiron. Any framework can be made 'generic' by removing the word 'development'. It's the same with making planned frameworks 'Agile' by adding the prefix to their roles. Agile PM, Agile Tester, Agile BA etc. Most of the Agile practices are far older than AM but they were used inside planned frameworks.
I agree that any framework can be adapted to non software development domains but originally most of them were developed by software developers for software development.
Network:852



Dec 18, 2018 10:44 AM
Replying to Peter Ambrosy
...
On top of Kiron's comment: Please check out DSDM. DSDM does address agile project management framework topics.
Thank you Peter. I don't consider DSDM an Agile framework. I'm happy to have a chat in private. dan.s.roman@gmail.com
Network:852



Dec 18, 2018 8:26 AM
Replying to Jesus Martheyn Berbesi
...
Hi Stelian,

Scrum is not just for Software Development, it is implemented for projects that require fast project impact and results. I guess it can be applied as you require. About the budget management, I guess in this case works better traditional management and track.
Jesus. A project is defined by time, budget and scope. Have a look at the Scrum Guide and try to identify those 3 attributes. It's enough to read the first sentence "Scrum is a framework for developing, delivering, and sustaining complex products" to understand that Scrum is not a Project Management framework.
Network:852



Dec 18, 2018 7:51 AM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Stelian -

The scaled framework used by my current client (a bank) which was developed incorporating ideas from a few different standard scaled frameworks is being used for both technology and non-technology projects.

With very slight adaptation, Scrum can be applied to such situations - rather than a Development Team, it might just be a Team, and sprint duration may need to be adjusted if it is impossible to split work items down to a level where they meet INVEST criteria but will still fit within a sprint.

I've taught a course at one of our nearby universities on this very topic and it is just a question of adaptation of specific practices whereas the values & principles can be applied more or less "as is".

Kiron
The second point was that I am looking for a framework that has a financial management component....
...
1 reply by Kiron Bondale
Dec 18, 2018 4:34 PM
Kiron Bondale
...
Depends on the agile approach taken. If you are using sprints with a stable team, then you have a fixed labor cost to estimate based on the total number of sprints. More mature teams could start to associate business value and costs with individual features.

I think you need to provide more specifics as I don't see the need for a completely separate approach to financial management when dealing with adaptive lifecycles.

Kiron
Network:1319



Dec 18, 2018 4:12 PM
Replying to Stelian ROMAN
...
The second point was that I am looking for a framework that has a financial management component....
Depends on the agile approach taken. If you are using sprints with a stable team, then you have a fixed labor cost to estimate based on the total number of sprints. More mature teams could start to associate business value and costs with individual features.

I think you need to provide more specifics as I don't see the need for a completely separate approach to financial management when dealing with adaptive lifecycles.

Kiron
...
2 replies by Stelian ROMAN
Dec 18, 2018 5:04 PM
Stelian ROMAN
...
Thanks Kiron. I don't believe that stable teams are good. From the productivity it may be true but from embracing change and Agility fixed teams of permanent staff become very inefficient while using Agile framworks.
Also, projects are usually delivered by contractors. In reality the (project) cost has a lot of components: internal staff, contractors, vendors, licenses, hardware. Someone needs to sign the invoices and track the cost. I know pretty well who does it and how it works in real life. I am interested how it works on paper and in in the training courses.
Dec 18, 2018 5:05 PM
Stelian ROMAN
...
o a side note, from Lean point if view assigning and tracking cost at a feature level is a waste.
Network:852



Dec 18, 2018 4:34 PM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Depends on the agile approach taken. If you are using sprints with a stable team, then you have a fixed labor cost to estimate based on the total number of sprints. More mature teams could start to associate business value and costs with individual features.

I think you need to provide more specifics as I don't see the need for a completely separate approach to financial management when dealing with adaptive lifecycles.

Kiron
Thanks Kiron. I don't believe that stable teams are good. From the productivity it may be true but from embracing change and Agility fixed teams of permanent staff become very inefficient while using Agile framworks.
Also, projects are usually delivered by contractors. In reality the (project) cost has a lot of components: internal staff, contractors, vendors, licenses, hardware. Someone needs to sign the invoices and track the cost. I know pretty well who does it and how it works in real life. I am interested how it works on paper and in in the training courses.
Network:852



Dec 18, 2018 4:34 PM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Depends on the agile approach taken. If you are using sprints with a stable team, then you have a fixed labor cost to estimate based on the total number of sprints. More mature teams could start to associate business value and costs with individual features.

I think you need to provide more specifics as I don't see the need for a completely separate approach to financial management when dealing with adaptive lifecycles.

Kiron
o a side note, from Lean point if view assigning and tracking cost at a feature level is a waste.
...
1 reply by Kiron Bondale
Dec 19, 2018 7:58 AM
Kiron Bondale
...
Associating value or costs at a feature level is no different than detailed cost estimation at a work package level in a traditional approach. The benefit of doing this is that we can track value delivered and provide some objectivity (as a factor in WSJF) to prioritizing the backlog.

In the absence of a PM, the mechanics of processing the actual costs would be done by a finance role (e.g. finance analyst) supporting the product or in smaller shops might be done by the PO themselves.

Kiron
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