Project Management Central

Please login or join to subscribe to this thread

Topics: Career Development, Consulting
Advice on accelerating a career transition into Project Management
Network:165



Hello and thanks for reading my question! I recently decided to make the transition into Project Management after being in Sales for 15 years in the Telecom and Food distribution industries. I am currently attending a Project Management Certificate course at UC Berkeley Extension where I hope to eventually test for my PMP.

My goal is to get hired in the next 1-2 months in a PM role. Any advice that you can share with me is greatly appreciated and please feel free to connect with me!

Best
Chris
Sort By:
Page: 1 2 next>
Network:484



Hi Chris

To get a PMP certification requires you to have worked in project management for something like 4500 hours (the requirements are all on the PMI site) as a Project Manager directing, managing, coordinating. As part of the application process you must justify the hours worked and one in a few applications may be audited by PMI, requiring your employer to endorse your PM skills and experience.

It requires you to apply the practical project management experience that you have gained over several years and off course requires rigorous preparation over several months.

However, you can still qualify to become a CAPM (Certified Associate in Project Managment) which is along the lines of PMBOK but is a straight forward theoretical examination on PMBOK concepts through attending training course

You can also do your PRINCE2 certification (both Foundation and Practitioner) which is more of a Project Management Method than a generic body of knowledge but you can benefit immensely.

On the other hand, you can also look at Agile courses like Certified Scrum Master as a foray into the Agile world of Project Management.

Whilst getting certified is not that hard and there are options, being hired as a Project Manager without having a lot of experience doing that role is the tough part.

some of your soft skills from Sales are definitely transferable

Persuasion
Influence
Motivation
Emotional Intelligence

Also to your advantage is your vast experience in the Telecom and Food Industries.

As a starting point, If you are currently employed, you can look at avenues within your firm where you could work in Project Management as a Project coordinator or ask to be given a big piece of work where you can use and develop project management skills.In the mean time do the certifications that don't enforce project management experience like Prince2 or Certified Scrum Master and gradually make the move within a couple of years.

If I were you, I highly doubt that any one would hire me purely as a project manager based on a certificate course without actual experience.
...
1 reply by Chris Batti
Jan 10, 2019 12:44 AM
Chris Batti
...
Thank you Deepesh! I appreciate you taking the time to share your wisdom. I will definitely take a look at the CAPM as that sounds like a good starting point. I will also speak with the folks at my local PMI Chapter as well.

Best
Network:15068



Yes I would agree the CAPM certification makes more sense in your situation.
Network:165



Jan 09, 2019 7:25 PM
Replying to Deepesh Rammoorthy, PMP®AgilePM®
...
Hi Chris

To get a PMP certification requires you to have worked in project management for something like 4500 hours (the requirements are all on the PMI site) as a Project Manager directing, managing, coordinating. As part of the application process you must justify the hours worked and one in a few applications may be audited by PMI, requiring your employer to endorse your PM skills and experience.

It requires you to apply the practical project management experience that you have gained over several years and off course requires rigorous preparation over several months.

However, you can still qualify to become a CAPM (Certified Associate in Project Managment) which is along the lines of PMBOK but is a straight forward theoretical examination on PMBOK concepts through attending training course

You can also do your PRINCE2 certification (both Foundation and Practitioner) which is more of a Project Management Method than a generic body of knowledge but you can benefit immensely.

On the other hand, you can also look at Agile courses like Certified Scrum Master as a foray into the Agile world of Project Management.

Whilst getting certified is not that hard and there are options, being hired as a Project Manager without having a lot of experience doing that role is the tough part.

some of your soft skills from Sales are definitely transferable

Persuasion
Influence
Motivation
Emotional Intelligence

Also to your advantage is your vast experience in the Telecom and Food Industries.

As a starting point, If you are currently employed, you can look at avenues within your firm where you could work in Project Management as a Project coordinator or ask to be given a big piece of work where you can use and develop project management skills.In the mean time do the certifications that don't enforce project management experience like Prince2 or Certified Scrum Master and gradually make the move within a couple of years.

If I were you, I highly doubt that any one would hire me purely as a project manager based on a certificate course without actual experience.
Thank you Deepesh! I appreciate you taking the time to share your wisdom. I will definitely take a look at the CAPM as that sounds like a good starting point. I will also speak with the folks at my local PMI Chapter as well.

Best
Network:723



Hi Chris, as much as I agree with Deepesh, I would be more optimistic. First, I would take a closer look at quantifying your current experience with project management though working in sales. It all depends on the type of sales activities you were performing. Telecom and sales distribution industry is not my area, but
1. Did you work on a bit more complex assignments for customers that required preparation of inputs, communication and coordination of specialists and / or other departments to deliver the details needed for customer negotiation?
2. Did it take couple of weeks between initial customer discussion and closing of the deal and were you required to figure out several steps to proceed until the deal was closed?
3. Did you manage all these preparation activities and probably working on mulptiple cases at the same time?
4. Did you have to deal with risks, e.g. not having all inputs on time, not having all details available, possible communication issues?
5. Did you need to put en effort in order to understand customer needs and translate them into specifications? Did you have more customer representatives and did you need to manage their expectations?

If yes, I would call it Project Management activities. I described planning, risk management, communication, team coordination, stakeholders management. Sales can be quite complex, depends on customers and solutions you’re selling.
...
2 replies by Chris Batti and Deepesh Rammoorthy, PMP®AgilePM®
Jan 10, 2019 1:09 AM
Deepesh Rammoorthy, PMP®AgilePM®
...
wow Lenka. great comments! I hope Chris finds an opportunity to talk to someone like you who can discover good talent rather than get stuck with a recruiter or an automated software that looks for specific project management terms. Maybe the world is losing out on talented PMs because many companies don't know where to find one.
Jan 10, 2019 6:52 AM
Chris Batti
...
Hi Lenka, thank you for the advice! I never thought of my work in those terms. I am working on a list of customers I worked with in the past so that I can quantify my experience.

Your feedback is very much appreciated!
Chris Batti
Network:484



Jan 10, 2019 1:01 AM
Replying to Lenka Pincot
...
Hi Chris, as much as I agree with Deepesh, I would be more optimistic. First, I would take a closer look at quantifying your current experience with project management though working in sales. It all depends on the type of sales activities you were performing. Telecom and sales distribution industry is not my area, but
1. Did you work on a bit more complex assignments for customers that required preparation of inputs, communication and coordination of specialists and / or other departments to deliver the details needed for customer negotiation?
2. Did it take couple of weeks between initial customer discussion and closing of the deal and were you required to figure out several steps to proceed until the deal was closed?
3. Did you manage all these preparation activities and probably working on mulptiple cases at the same time?
4. Did you have to deal with risks, e.g. not having all inputs on time, not having all details available, possible communication issues?
5. Did you need to put en effort in order to understand customer needs and translate them into specifications? Did you have more customer representatives and did you need to manage their expectations?

If yes, I would call it Project Management activities. I described planning, risk management, communication, team coordination, stakeholders management. Sales can be quite complex, depends on customers and solutions you’re selling.
wow Lenka. great comments! I hope Chris finds an opportunity to talk to someone like you who can discover good talent rather than get stuck with a recruiter or an automated software that looks for specific project management terms. Maybe the world is losing out on talented PMs because many companies don't know where to find one.
Network:243



Many PMs do not have cerfiticate. So you are not required to own a cerfiticate to take that role (some projects and companies require PM with cerfiticate). Just check the knowledge areas in PMBok to find out the gaps with things you possess and think about how to improve them. For your goal, I think you should study PMBok carefully, read articles in this PM community and describe your experiences in PM related terms in your CV as well as when interviewing.
...
1 reply by Chris Batti
Jan 10, 2019 7:04 AM
Chris Batti
...
Thank you Nguyen, I think that is a good idea. I am categorizing my thoughts on 3x5 cards so I can redo my resume to reflect everything I am learning thru my studies and the PM community.

Best
Network:6492



Agree with Sante
Network:165



Jan 10, 2019 1:01 AM
Replying to Lenka Pincot
...
Hi Chris, as much as I agree with Deepesh, I would be more optimistic. First, I would take a closer look at quantifying your current experience with project management though working in sales. It all depends on the type of sales activities you were performing. Telecom and sales distribution industry is not my area, but
1. Did you work on a bit more complex assignments for customers that required preparation of inputs, communication and coordination of specialists and / or other departments to deliver the details needed for customer negotiation?
2. Did it take couple of weeks between initial customer discussion and closing of the deal and were you required to figure out several steps to proceed until the deal was closed?
3. Did you manage all these preparation activities and probably working on mulptiple cases at the same time?
4. Did you have to deal with risks, e.g. not having all inputs on time, not having all details available, possible communication issues?
5. Did you need to put en effort in order to understand customer needs and translate them into specifications? Did you have more customer representatives and did you need to manage their expectations?

If yes, I would call it Project Management activities. I described planning, risk management, communication, team coordination, stakeholders management. Sales can be quite complex, depends on customers and solutions you’re selling.
Hi Lenka, thank you for the advice! I never thought of my work in those terms. I am working on a list of customers I worked with in the past so that I can quantify my experience.

Your feedback is very much appreciated!
Chris Batti
Network:2074



Be optimistic, speak to a career coach and/or professional resume writer to highlight and map your strengts and accomplishments to help Garner interest in the value you would briuto the organization. Good luck!
...
1 reply by Chris Batti
Jan 10, 2019 7:07 AM
Chris Batti
...
Thank you Andrew, I will do that!

Chris
Network:165



Jan 10, 2019 1:51 AM
Replying to Nguyen Khai
...
Many PMs do not have cerfiticate. So you are not required to own a cerfiticate to take that role (some projects and companies require PM with cerfiticate). Just check the knowledge areas in PMBok to find out the gaps with things you possess and think about how to improve them. For your goal, I think you should study PMBok carefully, read articles in this PM community and describe your experiences in PM related terms in your CV as well as when interviewing.
Thank you Nguyen, I think that is a good idea. I am categorizing my thoughts on 3x5 cards so I can redo my resume to reflect everything I am learning thru my studies and the PM community.

Best
Page: 1 2 next>  

Please login or join to reply

Content ID:
ADVERTISEMENTS

"Man prefers to believe what he prefers to be true."

- Francis Bacon

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsors

Vendor Events

See all Vendor Events