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Topics: Ethics and Organizational Culture, Leadership
How do you generate trust?
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Trust is a critical element of a constructive environment on a project. Without it, individuals likely will not maximize their contribution to the team. What traits/behaviors of the leader can generate trust among the team and encourage project process and advancement?

What are the ethical elements of supporting a trusting environment? What should a leader do and why?

Let's focus on the positive instead of what hasn't worked. Share your experiences. Let's talk about it.
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Great topic Valerie. Thank you for bringing this up!

I believe a culture of trust comes from a culture of caring. As long you care about your team members by showing support, coaching, listening, being concerned of their well-being not only inside the workplace, but also inside their homes, they would feel comfortable around you and, thus, trust you. This would automatically create a bond between you and your team members, and between one team member and another. It would maximize commitment and show some kind of "allegiance" to the team and to the project.

And Yes! A Team Charter is a great tool to set this trust atmosphere in the team and commit to it.
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1 reply by Valerie Denney
Feb 04, 2019 9:49 PM
Valerie Denney
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Yes. That is perfect--- a culture of caring. Does the leader care enough to make a difference and develop trust? Caring takes time. Do leaders spend the time to really care?

You comment about developing a team charter is spot on. Too many times project managers see a team charter as simply something that is required, instead of an opportunity to build the team culture.
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I agree with you Valerie.

Trust is one of critical link of conducive Project environment. Without creating a trustworthy culture among your team it is difficult to achieve set success.

Openess and effective communication is very important to built trust among your team. Transparency is another critical element to gain trust from your team members. Showing and demonstrating empathy is another success factor to win trust from your team.
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1 reply by Valerie Denney
Feb 04, 2019 9:56 PM
Valerie Denney
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Thank you Alok,

I too agree that openness and transparency are two of the keys to trust. I don't think that enough people take into account the amount of time that this takes. It doesn't happen overnight. It needs to be a continual process.

Valerie
Network:1428



The culture of any organization (or team) is shaped by the best behavior the leader is willing to amplify. Modeling the right behavior, and facilitating the team's creation of a working agreement which includes how team members will deal with interpersonal conflicts and encouraging candid feedback can all help.

Longevity also helps which is another benefit of long-lived value stream-centric teams over short-lived project teams.

Kiron
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1 reply by Valerie Denney
Feb 04, 2019 9:57 PM
Valerie Denney
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Kiron,

Thank you for your thoughtful response. The leader certainly sets the tone for the organization. I love the word "amplify" in this context. Nicely done.
Network:2286



I see trust as the willingness to suffer. It is an emotion, that can (and should) be triggered by a leader.
If a leader
* respects my status, role and personality
* acts responsible e.g. by taking blame for team failures,
* reduces fear and increases certainty, e.g. by showing a vision
* allows autonomy, e.g. delegates decision making and
* instills a team identity and pride and
* decides fairly
- who should not trust this leader.
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1 reply by Valerie Denney
Feb 04, 2019 10:16 PM
Valerie Denney
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Thomas, Thank you so much for contributing. Is suffering a necessary condition for a trustful environment? This is a perspective I never considered before. I would love to hear more from you.

Just curious... what is the source of the bullets you posted?
Network:1032



Valerie, thanks for this topic.

A culture of trust in an organization instills staff and any projects team the liberty of exercising the "package\" of behaviors that trust brings.
"The benefits of a ....model based on trust are significant. In such relationships, even disagreements can be negotiated collaboratively (Kerzner, 2004)".
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1 reply by Valerie Denney
Feb 04, 2019 10:08 PM
Valerie Denney
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Lily,

Thank you for adding some poignant quotes to support the discussion. Isn't that a great phrase "the liberty of exercising...the behaviors"
Network:1922



This is good topic. I believe its the team which makes the culture and leader is the one who can shape that by his/her behavior. How management treats its people impacts everything and that makes a lot of difference. I have worked with leaders who creates environment of trust and stands by the team in bad times and hence created a high performance team.
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1 reply by Valerie Denney
Feb 04, 2019 10:04 PM
Valerie Denney
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Thank you Alankar for sharing your thoughts. The leader's behavior shapes the team (and the culture).

As you pointed out, the true test is if trust exists during those bad times. It is easy when everything is going well.
Network:1641



Valerie, this is a great topic. Thank you. Trust is the basis of any relationship. Trust is shaped by multiple factors such as organizational culture, type of leadership and a unique relationship of the project manager and the team.

In my opinion, being humble and upfront on stating our own expectations is critical for the team to understand what is expected. It will be unfair to demand trust when we are not upfront stating our expectations and living a culture of openness.

This first steps goes a long way in creating a culture of trust. .
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1 reply by Valerie Denney
Feb 04, 2019 10:01 PM
Valerie Denney
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Deepa,

Thank you so much for your words of wisdom. As you pointed out, trust does not JUST apply to the project environment. It applies to ALL environments and relationships.

Have you ever experienced a toxic culture where the workers did not trust the leaders...and the leaders did not trust the workers? I have. It was ugly.
Network:7038



Interesting one.
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1 reply by Valerie Denney
Feb 04, 2019 9:58 PM
Valerie Denney
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Rajseh, I am glad you enjoyed it. What are your thoughts? What have you experienced?
Network:26



Great Topic!

Developing, nurturing, and sustaining trust must be an on-going leadership activity. I find a team will reciprocate a leader’s traits and behaviors defining an optimistic culture ONLY if the team trusts what the leader does and says (walk the talk). This means a leader supports the program vision and mission demonstrating this through high levels of communication, delegation, and mentoring/training opportunities. It’s not hard to identify a liar or someone who can’t stand up for their team’s beliefs and opinions. As possible, it’s important to be transparent about decisions and governance intention. If team members believe in their leadership they’re more likely to behave in a similar manner. There will always be a rotten egg in the bunch. The key is to manage expectation and minimize overall stakeholder risk.
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1 reply by Valerie Denney
Feb 04, 2019 9:53 PM
Valerie Denney
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Jason, Your point on this being an on-going activity is spot on. It certainly isn't something you can simply put on a calednar of events and look at it a few times. The opportunities for developing, nurturing, and sustaining trust are serendipitous (my favorite work for accidents and occuring by chance.

Thank you for your great observations about walking the talk.
Network:762



Feb 02, 2019 7:08 PM
Replying to Yassine Belkoura
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Great topic Valerie. Thank you for bringing this up!

I believe a culture of trust comes from a culture of caring. As long you care about your team members by showing support, coaching, listening, being concerned of their well-being not only inside the workplace, but also inside their homes, they would feel comfortable around you and, thus, trust you. This would automatically create a bond between you and your team members, and between one team member and another. It would maximize commitment and show some kind of "allegiance" to the team and to the project.

And Yes! A Team Charter is a great tool to set this trust atmosphere in the team and commit to it.
Yes. That is perfect--- a culture of caring. Does the leader care enough to make a difference and develop trust? Caring takes time. Do leaders spend the time to really care?

You comment about developing a team charter is spot on. Too many times project managers see a team charter as simply something that is required, instead of an opportunity to build the team culture.
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