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Topics: PMI Standards
Should there be an additional PMP Certification added?
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So I sit and I think of when I first originally took my PMP Certification. I have been in the Project/Program Management field for over 16 Years now by the way, and as I help others study and prepare for their exams I cant help but notice that the PMP exam while a prestigious and definite denominator for separation of qualified individuals, has a mixture of questions that plainly does not pertain to some. How So? Take into the account the AGILE or SCRUM directed questions, or a few that touch on Lean Methodologies. Some questions geared towards software development or Product Production may not necessarily pertain to one who is in say, Construction Project Management. Or vice versa. Yet we are all expected to cram our heads full of PMBOK references, AGILE Processes, SCRUM roles and responsibilities but these things are just not relevant to all. Perhaps good for a "Master Project Management Professional", but does this mean that one who does not know the processes involved in a Software Development Project knows not the ins and outs of a Operational Project? Even though I may hold a PMP Certification, with my 16 years of PM expertise being in the Operational and Management side of the house, I will clearly be overlooked by a software firm looking for a PMP or PgMP qualified candidate to one with no certification but a lengthy career in the field. As PMI approaches its 50 years of Advancing the Profession, it has added to the standards to achieve these coveted certifications, but does it really signify our knowledge and ability in our individual and specific career fields? It may be time to designate for example, PMP-S for software development, PMP-C for Construction, and so on. And for the dreaded blanket Certification maybe as mentioned before a MPMP Certification designating one who is a Master of all things Project Management.

The fact that some questions touch on Lean Methodologies, which are more specific to Production type projects involving a particular product. Or SCRUM and AGILE questions which are more geared towards our software folks. Operational Processes in Project Management do not require for some to have knowledge to practice these items in their daily duties.

Food for thought as in the software development and production fields where it is common place for PM's to be PMP certified, you do not find as many PMP qualified Project Managers in the Construction or Government fields. As our world of Project Management grows and becomes more complex, is it time to finally settle on the fact that a PMP is not a true indicator of ones professional experience or dare I say experience in their specific career fields? Your Thoughts?
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Jonathan -

The PMP was never intended to be a primary indicator of competency. Industry or domain-specific certifications are certainly one possible area of growth, but unless PMI first culls some of its existing certifications, adding more will add to the ongoing maintenance burden.

Kiron
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1 reply by Jonathan Warren
Feb 09, 2019 7:18 PM
Jonathan Warren
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Yes Kiron, I do understand that that was not the intended reason for the development and mission of PMP, to be a primary indicator. But do others? When one is told that an individual is PMP Certified, what expectations are formed? I do agree with you as well on PMI having to cull some of the existing (some redundant) certifications prior to the advancement and development of others. My question however, is it time to proceed now in making movement to said actions and would it serve a purpose?
Network:310



Feb 09, 2019 10:34 AM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Jonathan -

The PMP was never intended to be a primary indicator of competency. Industry or domain-specific certifications are certainly one possible area of growth, but unless PMI first culls some of its existing certifications, adding more will add to the ongoing maintenance burden.

Kiron
Yes Kiron, I do understand that that was not the intended reason for the development and mission of PMP, to be a primary indicator. But do others? When one is told that an individual is PMP Certified, what expectations are formed? I do agree with you as well on PMI having to cull some of the existing (some redundant) certifications prior to the advancement and development of others. My question however, is it time to proceed now in making movement to said actions and would it serve a purpose?
Network:2371



Jonathan, well your inquiry is legitimate however The PMP knowledge area is really vast and very wide to cover lots of topic so I guess it is OK to test you on each area little by little so as PMP we are expected to know most area like Motivational theories, control charts, bell curve standard deviation and as you know six sigma is a project so lean six sigma can be an area of interest as well, at the same time they are not asking very deep question about regression analysis or Fourier serious or Laplace Transforms so if your background related or an engineer you would know more about it but the specialization of the your field comes from your experience and which area your practice.
Therefore I agree with you if you are PMP doing construction of course you don't want to apply for IT job where they expect you to know Cisco, Proxy Trojan, FTP etc
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1 reply by Jonathan Warren
Feb 11, 2019 1:30 PM
Jonathan Warren
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Thank you for your response Riyadh, that is my exact point. Who knows what the future of PMI holds! Have a good one.
Network:310



Feb 09, 2019 11:40 PM
Replying to Riyadh Salih
...
Jonathan, well your inquiry is legitimate however The PMP knowledge area is really vast and very wide to cover lots of topic so I guess it is OK to test you on each area little by little so as PMP we are expected to know most area like Motivational theories, control charts, bell curve standard deviation and as you know six sigma is a project so lean six sigma can be an area of interest as well, at the same time they are not asking very deep question about regression analysis or Fourier serious or Laplace Transforms so if your background related or an engineer you would know more about it but the specialization of the your field comes from your experience and which area your practice.
Therefore I agree with you if you are PMP doing construction of course you don't want to apply for IT job where they expect you to know Cisco, Proxy Trojan, FTP etc
Thank you for your response Riyadh, that is my exact point. Who knows what the future of PMI holds! Have a good one.
Network:263



There is a similar conversation going in this article's comments::
https://www.projectmanagement.com/articles...-Certifications

I'm torn on this, but I like one of the comments. PMI has promoted Project Management as a stand-alone profession that is not specific to any industry. If we start offering industry-specific certifications, it degrades the notion of project management as a profession. Your specific abilities in your industry (construction, aerospace, software, etc) are probably best reflected as accomplishments on your résumé than by additional certifications.

Of course, many PMs switch industries throughout their career, and perhaps they need to acquire new domain knowledge. But each industry is already represented by their own professional organizations and certifications; PMI doesn't necessarily need to get involved.
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1 reply by Jonathan Warren
Feb 13, 2019 10:34 PM
Jonathan Warren
...
Thank you for your comment, greatly appreciated.
Network:310



Feb 12, 2019 12:56 PM
Replying to Wade Harshman
...
There is a similar conversation going in this article's comments::
https://www.projectmanagement.com/articles...-Certifications

I'm torn on this, but I like one of the comments. PMI has promoted Project Management as a stand-alone profession that is not specific to any industry. If we start offering industry-specific certifications, it degrades the notion of project management as a profession. Your specific abilities in your industry (construction, aerospace, software, etc) are probably best reflected as accomplishments on your résumé than by additional certifications.

Of course, many PMs switch industries throughout their career, and perhaps they need to acquire new domain knowledge. But each industry is already represented by their own professional organizations and certifications; PMI doesn't necessarily need to get involved.
Thank you for your comment, greatly appreciated.

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