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Topics: Stakeholder Management
Disputes/differences can potentially derail/stall a project including negatively affecting future business relationships.What role can the project manager play to avoid or minimize this all together?
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Contract Management
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Yes .Disputes can hurt performance, and future business relationship.

1- First of all , contract should be clear and concise . so the parties develop same interpretations of the contract . It can minimize the chance of dispute.

2- Provide Specific Examples of Material Breach of Contract .

3- There should no Open-Ended Terms in the contracts.

4- Contracts require conformity to "industry standards" or performance that is "appropriate," "sufficient" or "best practice." . Define Performance Standards very clear.

5- Provide Written Notice of Any Breach of Contract
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1 reply by Collins Aluga
Mar 14, 2019 9:29 AM
Collins Aluga
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Thank you for those points.I agree with you,the contract should be clear enough and perhaps broad enough to accommodate any issue that may arise
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If your question is about to contract management, project manager has nothing to do except to facilitate the work of people that project manager has assigned as subject matter expert on the field when planning the project.
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This is absolutely true. I agree with Shadav's points above. Avoiding and resolving conflict is an important skills that a project manager can bring. Often, these arise from trust and communication issues. A few techniques that I find helpful in resolving a dispute once it has occurred are:
* Focus on shared goals and objectives ("we both want this project to be successful")
* Start conversations with the shared goal and objectives to work through dispute and have a successful relationship
* Identify alternatives based on the realistic constraints of your situation situation you are in
* Clearly identify decision makers, present options, recommend a path forward, and put the decision in the hands of the decision makers
* Keep emotion out and stick to the facts - also keep conversation "future oriented" - what are the paths in front of you (versus on blame for past events)
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1 reply by Collins Aluga
Mar 14, 2019 9:34 AM
Collins Aluga
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Thank you for your insight
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We call this relational contracting. I have seen very successful cases and disastrous ones. It is all about how the PM approaches the contract/contractor and the ensuing relationship that develops between them. We are changing our approach with respect to how contracts and contractors are managed. Rather than going with the "black and white" of the contract clauses, our approach is to be more flexible with a mindset of seeing issues through the lens of the contractor. Like most things in life, it is always a comprise, and as long as both parties are willing to compromise, it usually ends up being a win-win situation. You gotta know when to hold'em and fold'em.
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1 reply by Collins Aluga
Mar 14, 2019 10:04 AM
Collins Aluga
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Thank you Steve for the advice
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Mar 13, 2019 10:24 AM
Replying to SHADAV MOHAMMAD ANSARI
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Yes .Disputes can hurt performance, and future business relationship.

1- First of all , contract should be clear and concise . so the parties develop same interpretations of the contract . It can minimize the chance of dispute.

2- Provide Specific Examples of Material Breach of Contract .

3- There should no Open-Ended Terms in the contracts.

4- Contracts require conformity to "industry standards" or performance that is "appropriate," "sufficient" or "best practice." . Define Performance Standards very clear.

5- Provide Written Notice of Any Breach of Contract
Thank you for those points.I agree with you,the contract should be clear enough and perhaps broad enough to accommodate any issue that may arise
Network:226



Mar 13, 2019 3:08 PM
Replying to Carmen Jenkins
...
This is absolutely true. I agree with Shadav's points above. Avoiding and resolving conflict is an important skills that a project manager can bring. Often, these arise from trust and communication issues. A few techniques that I find helpful in resolving a dispute once it has occurred are:
* Focus on shared goals and objectives ("we both want this project to be successful")
* Start conversations with the shared goal and objectives to work through dispute and have a successful relationship
* Identify alternatives based on the realistic constraints of your situation situation you are in
* Clearly identify decision makers, present options, recommend a path forward, and put the decision in the hands of the decision makers
* Keep emotion out and stick to the facts - also keep conversation "future oriented" - what are the paths in front of you (versus on blame for past events)
Thank you for your insight
Network:226



Mar 13, 2019 3:16 PM
Replying to Steve Ratkaj
...
We call this relational contracting. I have seen very successful cases and disastrous ones. It is all about how the PM approaches the contract/contractor and the ensuing relationship that develops between them. We are changing our approach with respect to how contracts and contractors are managed. Rather than going with the "black and white" of the contract clauses, our approach is to be more flexible with a mindset of seeing issues through the lens of the contractor. Like most things in life, it is always a comprise, and as long as both parties are willing to compromise, it usually ends up being a win-win situation. You gotta know when to hold'em and fold'em.
Thank you Steve for the advice

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