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Topics: Agile, Change Management, Leadership
Why change initiative needs a scope?
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Regardless how much sounds this question obvious, I happened to be in situations where defined scope is considered not necessary. I'm looking for arguments why it is needed. By defined scope I mean high-level description, not WBS or anything even more detailed.
Thanks!
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Basically the project based on what to be initiate?? based on business analysis against social needs, environment, technology needs,..etc. Based on these business cases, it must be identified high level scope to know what is project requirement to increase project success!!
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Always you are creating a change with all the initiatives you started. First step to fail is when organizations do not understand that. Is basic. Is undestanding the organization as an open and adaptable system.
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To be honest, the question is a little bit unclear. you should know the scope of the work you are doing or going to do. failing to have a well-defined scope may lead to a lack of resources, time and etc.
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Lenka -

Without having scope defined, there is likely to be an expectation gap between what the team delivers and what the customer or other key stakeholders expected. This can lead to projects which continue well past their planned completion date.

High-level scope definition also helps to create shared understanding and identify misalignment between key stakeholders at an early enough point that it can be resolved without impacting the success criteria for the project.

Kiron
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1 reply by Lenka Pincot
Apr 26, 2019 9:26 AM
Lenka Pincot
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Hi Kiron, the point about expectation gap is very good, thanks! I guess this type of argument is what I'm looking for.
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Apr 26, 2019 8:36 AM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Lenka -

Without having scope defined, there is likely to be an expectation gap between what the team delivers and what the customer or other key stakeholders expected. This can lead to projects which continue well past their planned completion date.

High-level scope definition also helps to create shared understanding and identify misalignment between key stakeholders at an early enough point that it can be resolved without impacting the success criteria for the project.

Kiron
Hi Kiron, the point about expectation gap is very good, thanks! I guess this type of argument is what I'm looking for.
Network:2251



What is the expected result of the change initiative. If you specify this you have a scope. If there is an allergy against the term, call it epic or value description.

Normally you are dealing with people and changing behaviors. I would not do trial and error or you might run into resistance you would not have with a proven approach.
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1 reply by Lenka Pincot
Apr 26, 2019 10:52 AM
Lenka Pincot
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thanks Thomas, calling it value description sounds like a great suggestion.
Network:221



Lenka,
Configuration control includes the change process, and the documentation defining a change is a configurable item, so without a defined scope, you lack configuration control. That can cause your cost and schedule to grow out of control as people decide that this is an opportunity to include many extra things because it seems like a good opportunity. Technical conflicts also arise as the SOW of various groups diverge.

Furthermore, when people keep adding things to an existing change, it becomes impossible to approve and incorporate the included items into the downstream business systems. When that goes on too long, by the time the change can be approved, you can find you're already off the critical path because the team couldn't start working on Item A, until Item B, then C, then D... could be included. That is a situation where I had to convince my leadership that we needed to bound a very large change, or my teams would be on-hold indefinitely until it is approved.
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1 reply by Lenka Pincot
Apr 26, 2019 10:53 AM
Lenka Pincot
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thanks Keith, very good overview of what may go wrong!
Network:822



Apr 26, 2019 9:53 AM
Replying to Thomas Walenta
...
What is the expected result of the change initiative. If you specify this you have a scope. If there is an allergy against the term, call it epic or value description.

Normally you are dealing with people and changing behaviors. I would not do trial and error or you might run into resistance you would not have with a proven approach.
thanks Thomas, calling it value description sounds like a great suggestion.
Network:822



Apr 26, 2019 10:25 AM
Replying to Keith Novak
...
Lenka,
Configuration control includes the change process, and the documentation defining a change is a configurable item, so without a defined scope, you lack configuration control. That can cause your cost and schedule to grow out of control as people decide that this is an opportunity to include many extra things because it seems like a good opportunity. Technical conflicts also arise as the SOW of various groups diverge.

Furthermore, when people keep adding things to an existing change, it becomes impossible to approve and incorporate the included items into the downstream business systems. When that goes on too long, by the time the change can be approved, you can find you're already off the critical path because the team couldn't start working on Item A, until Item B, then C, then D... could be included. That is a situation where I had to convince my leadership that we needed to bound a very large change, or my teams would be on-hold indefinitely until it is approved.
thanks Keith, very good overview of what may go wrong!
Network:280



To put it in terms that stakeholders may be better able to understand; the scope can be compared to a destination. Without a destination or end state to navigate toward, how will the team know when the journey is completed?
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